Bilton Ancestry
         Biltons of Hampsthwaite, Easingwold, malton & Beyond (North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England)
Biltons of Hampsthwaite, Easingwold, Malton & Beyond (North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England)
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Surname Page Main Bilton Page Bilton's of Leconfield & Hessle Some other East Yorkshire Bilton's Richard Bilton, NSW, Australia Other Bilton's of NSW, Australia Sources

            
Yorkshire & Northern England
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Easingwold-Thirsk-Topcliffe-Kilburn (blue grid 10x10km)
Easingwold area Map
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Malton area Map
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Richard, Hugh and unknown Bilton all appear in the parish of Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England, in the early 1600s. Hampsthwaite is in the Harrowgate area. References to each other's families in wills (often as "cousin") as well as common shared names indicates the three were brothers. Unfortunately available Hampsthwaite parish records only date back to the 1610s, by which time the third brother had died - his widow died in 1618. Both William and David are fornames that appear frequently in all three families, from the first generation, suggesting that perhaps William (or David) was the first generation of 'unknowns'. "Unknown (1.2)" was likewise probably either William or David.
       

1. Unknown Bilton. Married unknown.

Children of unknown Bilton (Presumed siblings):
*
i.
 
Richard Bilton, probably born between 1550-1560 (from DOB of issue).
*
ii.

Unknown Bilton, probably born between 1540-1570.
*
iii.

Hugh Bilton,[617] probably born between 1560-1570. {Hugh was used interchangably with Henry}

     
   

1.1. Richard Bilton, probably born between 1550-1560 (from DOB of issue). Died 1628 & buried 9/12/1628, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Will dated 24/2/1628, Richard Bilton of Birsteth, Hampsthwaite parish, yeoman.[590]
 "4 and 5 Charles I (1628-9). Feb. 24, 1628. — I, Richard Bilton of Birsteth, yeoman, to be buried at Hampesthwait. I will that the poore of the younger sort everie one of them to have a penny, and all that is above fortie yeares to have two pence a peice ; to my godchildren, everie one of them xijd.; to Francis Bilton, Miles Stubb, William Stubb, Thomas Bilton, Miles and John Bilton, Thomas Lewtie, Miles Farnell and Steven Inglesaunt, everie one of them xij d.; to John Lewties children, everie of them vj d.; to my sonne William iij s. iiij d.; to Thomas Bilton x s.; to widdow Wikeley, Issabell Milner, widdow, Robert Fairbarne wife, Thomas Milner wife, Robert Umplebie of Swincliffe and John Hardestie, everie one of them xij d.; to John Murras wife, widow, John Tottell wife, Steven Murras, Thomas Askwith, John Hemsley, Miles Murrus, to everie one of them vj d.; to John Umplebie, my man, one ewe and one lambe; to Breckand Bridge iij s. iiij d.; to my sonne William x li. to be paid at Michaellmas next after my decease; to Eline, his wife, one white cowe ; to Issabell, my daughter, one cubbord and the best chiste and ninetene peice of pewther and one brandreth; to Thomas Stubbs children ten ewes that is at Robert Umplebies of Swincliffe; to David Bilton children three shepe that is at his own house ; to my sonne William one cart with wheles, the cowpe and all the stees about the house &c. The rest to my three daughters, and make them executrices &c. I joyne as supervisors David Bilton, Tho. Stubb. Witnesses, Tho. Stubb, Will. Stubb, Dav. Bilton, John Murras. — Executrices named admitted."[590] 
Married Isabell.[586] Isabell died 1627 & buried 17/9/1627, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1628, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]

Children of Richard Bilton & Isabella:

i.
 
William Bilton.[590] Listed in the will of his father, Richard Bilton, 1628.[590]. Married Eline.[590]
*
ii.

Miles Bilton,[586,590] probably born between 1575-1580. (from DOB of issue) Listed as an heir in the will of Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] {Was mentioned in the will of his cousin, Ann Newall nee Bilton.[590]}

iii.

John Bilton.[590] Listed as an heir in the will of Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] Married unknown.
Children: (a)
 
Margaret Bilton, baptised 23/2/1617, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(b)
Marie Bilton, baptised 13/8/1620, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(c)Anne Bilton, baptised 7/10/1627, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]

iv.

Janet Bilton.[590] Died c.1624, Pannall, Co Yorkshire, England (widow).[590]
 Will dated 7/12/1623 & probated 1624, "22 James I and 1 Charles I (1624-5). Dec. 7, 1623.— Janett Hill, widdow of Henry Hill of Pannall, desired to be buried there. She gave to Geo., sonne of Henry Jackson, one tupe; to Maudlene and Jane Jackson, his daughters, to either of them one ewe, the saide three sheepe beinge in the hands of their saide father; to Alice her daughter, wiffe of the saide Henry Jackson, her best gowne and all her best apparell, also her chiste and all her napprie and other things therein, except two paire of shetes and some linnen which were the goodes of William Hill, her sonne ; to the said thre children of Henry Jackson vj d.; to Maudlene and Jane Jackson 8 yds. of sameran cloth ; to her daughter Alice one coverlitt, one blankett, one pillow, one pillow and one bolster; to Henry Jackson one cowe, price beinge xlvj s. oweing unto her by John Hill of Cattail ; to Maudlene Johnson, her maide servant, one petticoate, her best stockinges and vj s. viij d.; to Thomas Bilton, her brother, viij s. vj d.; to three of the youngest children of Richard Atkinson vj d.; to Jane Atkinson one gowne ; to fower of Rauffe Whawleys children, to everie one of them vj d. The residue to Edward and William Hill, her sonnes, equallie betweene them, and made her saide sonne William her sole executor &c. Witnesses, Edw. Hill, Maud Johnson. Executor named admitted."[590] 
Married Henry Hill.[590]

v.

Thomas Bilton.[590] Listed as an heir in the will of Richard Bilton, 1628.[590]
vi.
Isabell Bilton.[x05] Listed in the will of her father, Richard Bilton, 1628, unmarried.[590]

vii.
Jane Bilton,[586] probably born between 1580-1590. Three daughters listed in the will of Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] Married Richard Waddington, 28/10/1610, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

viii.
Mary Bilton,[586] probably born between 1580-1590. Three daughters listed in the will of Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] Married Christopher Dixon, 28/7/1612, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
Children: (a)
 
John Dickson, baptised 6/6/1613, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(b)
Anne Dickson, baptised 1/9/1616, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]

   
St Thomas, Hampsthwaite
St Thomas, Hampsthwaite
Image - undated postcard
Village green, Hampsthwaite
Village green, Hampsthwaite
Image - undated postcard
1676 Cottage, Hampsthwaite
1676 Cottage, Hampsthwaite
Photograph - Right Move
Hampsthwaite is a small village on the south bank of the River Nidd on the western edge of the Victorian spa town of Harrogate. Administratively Hampsthwaite is a civil parish in the borough of Harrogate and the county of North Yorkshire, England. Living mainly alongside two main streets and within more recent housing developments, the village has a mixed population of approximately 1200. The name 'Thwaite' comes from the Old Scandinavian word 'thveit', meaning 'clearing, meadow or paddock' and Hampsthwaite simply means the thwaite, or meadow, of Hamr or Hammall. The Roman road from 'Olicana' (Ilkley) to 'Isurium' (Aldborough) crossed the Nidd at Hamps-thwaite and this led to the development of a market. Hampsthwaite was situated within the Forest of Knaresborough, which was established as a royal hunting preserve in the time of the Conqueror. The church of Hampsthwaite was in existence soon after the Norman Conquest and was at one time in the possession of the monks of Knaresborough. The earliest written record of the settlement (c.1180) is as “Hamethwayt” in the Early Yorkshire Charters. In 1304, Edward the 1st granted the Market Charter of Hampsthwaite to hold an annual market and fair on the Feast of St Thomas the Martyr - Hampsthwaite being one of the few churches in the UK to be named after St. Thomas a' Becket. The family of the writer William Make-peace Thackeray lived in Hampsthwaite. In the churchyard are the graves of Joshua Tetley, the founder of the Tetley's Brewery in Leeds, and his wife Hannah.[Wikipedia, Hampsthwaite] "Hampsthwaite, a village and a township in Knaresborough district, and a parish partly also in Pateley Bridge district, W. R. Yorkshire. The village stands on the river Nidd, adjacent to the Nidd Valley railway, 2 miles SW of Ripley, and 4 NW of Harrogate; and has a station on the railway, a bridge over the Nidd, and a post office under Leeds. The township comprises 1, 170 acres. Real property, 1, 650. Pop., 513. Houses, 118. The parish contains also the townships of Felliscliffe, Birstwith, Menwith-with-Darley, and Thornthwaite-with-Padside. Acres, 9, 600. Real property, 10, 062. Pop., 2, 422. Houses, 561. The property is not much divided. The manors of Hampsthwaite and Menwith-with-Darley belong to the Duke of Devonshire; and that of Birstwith belongs to F. Greenwood, Esq. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Ripon. Value, 300.* Patrons, the Heirs of the late S. H. Shann, Esq. The church is an oblong edifice, in the pointed style; has an embattled tower; was rebuilt in 1821; and contains a few mural monuments. The vicarages of Birstwith and Thornthwaite are separate benefices. There are three chapels for Wesleyans, two for Primitive Methodists, and one for Quakers, an endowed school with 14 a year, and a national school.[1872 Imperial Gazetteer] The Church of St. Thomas a Becket. Whilst there is some evidence of a Celtic church on the site, the earliest known church on the site was built c.1180 by Hugh de Morville, one of the knights responsible for the murder of Archbishop Becket, to whom the church is dedicated. This church was probably destroyed in the period 1318-19 and then rebuilt sometime between the middle of the 14th and the beginning of the 15th centuries. This building was long and narrow with a high-angled roof. Some time later the south wall was removed and a side-wall, with a lean-to roof, was built outwards. In place of the south wall the main roof was supported by a row of octagonal-shaped pillars, bearing pointed arches, with the clerestory windows above. The final alteration removed the clerestory and covered the whole church with a single, wide roof. In 1820 the church was demolished, leaving only the tower. The new nave and chancel were almost certainly built on the same foundations as the earlier church, but the south aisle was enlarged to a size greater than the combined nave and chancel. New stone was used for the outside, but the inside walls incorporated much of the old stone. Over the whole building a single low-pitched roof was fixed. The church inside was austere, with very plain furnishings and a single stove at the back to provide heat. At the east end of the church was a small sanctuary, enclosed by a heavy wooden communion rail. Both the nave and the side aisle were furnished with high-backed pews, the ends being fitted with wooden doors. At the back of the church was the large stone font, thought to be Norman, with a tall cone-shaped wooden cover. The church, described as a barn-like edifice, was clearly too large for the parish and it remained in use for only eighty years. Following the building of three daughter churches at Thornthwaite, Darley and Birstwith, the church was rebuilt again in 1901. The new church is similar to the 14th and 15th century building pulled down in 1820. The walls of the nave and chancel were rebuilt on the same site and the church was made smaller by moving the south aisle inwards by eight feet.[St Thomas]
   
Wreaks Rd, Birstwith
Wreaks Road, Birstwith
Photograph - Google StreetView
St Robert of Knaresborough, Pannal
St Robert of Knaresborough, Pannal
Photograph - Alexander P Kapp [Geograph]
Cottage, Main St, Pannal
Cottage, Main St, Pannal
Photograph - Google StreetView
Pannal is a village in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England, to the immediate south of Harrogate. Pannal has been an important settlement in the British Empire for centuries. It developed in the middle of the former Knaresborough Forest and is believed to date back to the Bronze Age. The village became established following the Norman conquest in 1066 where large estates were granted to members of the Pagnell family, where the modern name, Pannal, derives from. Before this the village was known as Rosehurst. By the early 14th century, Pannal had become a thriving market village with weekly markets and an annual four day fair. St Robert's is the parish church in Pannal.[Wikipedia] "Pannal, a village and a parish in Knaresborough district, W. R. Yorkshire. The village stands on anaffluent of the river Nidd, and on the Leeds and Thirsk railway, 3 miles S of Harrogate; and has a station on the railway, and a post-office under Harrogate. The parish contains also Low Harrogate, and comprises 4, 520 acres. Real property, 13,069. Pop. in 1851, 1, 376; in 1861, 1, 587. Houses, 308. The property is much subdivided. The manor belongs to the Duke of Devonshire. A Roman bridge spans the Oak beck. Birk Crag is a romantic glen. All the spas of Harrogate, except one, are in Pannal. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of Ripon. Value, 318. Patron, the Rev. W. S. Vawdrey. The church is ancient but good; and consists of nave and chancel, with a tower. The p. curacy of Low Harrogate is a separate benefice. There are two Wesleyan chapels, and charities 5. See Harrogate."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer]
     
   

1.2. Unknown Bilton, probably born between 1540-1570. Married Anne Forest.[590] Ann died 1618 & buried 17/8/1618, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (widow).[586] Will probated 25/8/1618, mentiones sons William (and wife Margaret), David (and wife Dorothy) & Francis, and granddaughters, Ellin & Elizabeth.[590]
 "15 and 16 James I (1617-18). Aug. 25, 1618. I, Anne Bilton of Fellisclif, to be buried at Hampestwait. I give to John Forest one rid whiteheadit whie ; to William Bilton, my sonne, one bull calf ; to Jenit Forest, my sister, my best gowne; to Elizabeth my second gowne; to Ellin, my sister, my best peticote; to Jane Umpelbie, my sister, my blacke upper-bodie with the fustchon sleves; to Ellin and Elizabeth Bilton, my granddaughters, j line smoke and ij line apperons; to Katherine Oxnard one stuff peticote; to David Bilton, my sonne, one chist of panell ; to Will. Bilton, my sonne, one paire of lininge sheet, fower pillowvears, one paire of sameran sheetes and j long towell ; to David and Francis Bilton, ether of them, j longe towell ; to Margaret, wiffe of William Bilton, one handkirchey marked with red silke and one linne apperan; to Dorothy, wiffe of Dav. Bilton, one handkirchey marked with rid silke, one lininge sheete and one lininge apperan ; to John Forest wiffe one ridde upperbodie ; to Margaret Thompson my blewe saif egard ; to Barnard Gill wiffe my wortay peticote and one upperbodie ; xx s; to the poore of the parishe at the discrecon of my executors. The rest to David and Francis Bilton, my sonnes, whome I make executors &c. Witnesses, Rob. Skaiffe, Tho. Forest, Will. Bilton. Executors named admitted."[590] 
Resided 1618, Felliscliffe, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]

Children of unknown Bilton & Ann Forest:

i.
 
Ann Bilton.[590] Died 1633 & buried 2/12/1633, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] {Ann's will refers to the 5 surviving issue of her brother, William Bilton (there is only one matching William Bilton) and her cousin, Thomas Emote - William's widow married Thomas Emote)} Will dated 25/11/1633, Anne Newall of Darley, widow.[590]
 "9 and 10 Charles I (1633-4). Nov. 25, 1633. I, Anne Newall of Darley, widdow, to be buried in Hampsethwait Church, neare unto the place where my husband was buried. I will my debts &c. be paid out of my whole goodes. I give vli. to be and remaine in stock for ever to the use of the poore of the parish of Ripley, to be put fourth and employed at the sight and discretion of William Inglebie of Ripley, esq., and the Churchwardens, the encrease thereof to be yearlie distributed and given to the said poore. In like manner I give xli. to remaine for ever in stock for the use of the poore of Hampesthwait, to be put fourth and employed at the sight of my supervisors and two or fower sufficient and honest men within the said parish, by them appointed, and the Churchwardens and Overseers for the time being, and the increase thereof, yearlie coming in, to be distributed yearlie to the poore. I give vli. to remaine in stock to be put fourth at the sight of my supervisors and two or fower sufficient men of the parish of Fuiston and the Churchwardens and Overseers, and the increase to be given to the poore of the said parish yearlie. I give xli. to remaine in stock for ever towards the maintenance of the Curate or Minister of Thornthwait Chapell, and the same to be imployed and put fourth at the sight and discretion of my supervisors and two or fower men by them appointed, and the profitt thereof yearlie to be given to the Curate or Minister of the Church for the time being; and vli. to remaine in stock for ever towardes the maintenance of the Curate or Minister of the Westend Chappell, and the same to be imployed as aforesaid, at the discretion of my supervisors and fower or two sufficient men dwelling in the said Chappellrie by them appointed, and the use and profitt to be imployed as aforesaid. To the fower daughters of John Barnesley xlli., that is to say, to everie of them xli., to be paid unto them when they come to full age of xxj yeares, and during their minorities to be put fourth at the discretion of my supervisors, and goe forwardes to their uses; and if it happen any of them to die before they accomplish the said age or without lawfull issue, then the said x li. equallie to be devided amongst those sisters which shall live. To my brother William Biltons five children, to everie of them vj li. a peice, to be paid unto them when as they successivelie atteine and come to the full age of xxj yeares, and during their mynorities to be put fourth &c, and should any die before attaining that age or without lawfull issue, their portion to be equallie devided amongst those then liveing. To evrie of my godchildren and of my late husbandes godchildren now liveing within the parishes of Ripley, Hampsethwait and Fuiston, to everie of them ij s. apeice; to Margrett Roades, widdow, xls.; to Thomas Pott of Hampsethwait xls.; to my cossen Miles Bilton xls.; to Elizabeth Whelous, my servant, xxs.; to William Pawcett xx s.; to Heline, wife of James Inman, all that she and the said James oweth me, and vj s. viij d. besides; to William Hill all that he oweth me; to Issabell, wife of Anthonie Mier, the one half of the debt that she and the said Anthony doeth owe me; to Anne, wife of Miles Lollie, the debt which she and the said Miles doeth owe me; to the fower younger children of my brother, William Bilton, evrie of them iiij li. a peice, to be imployed to their use as the former legacie is, which I have given them ; to my cossen, Miles Stubb, x s.; to my cossen, Thomas Emote, all the debt which he oweth me; to Jane the wife of Francis Day, to Prances wife of William Hardcastle, Anne wife of Walter Wait, Anne wife of Francis Wait, Margaret wife of John Spence, to evrie of them a silver spoone ; to the children of Richard Rawden, my brother in law, to everie of them vli. a peice ; to the children of William Dixon, my brother in law, to evrie of them vli.; to Richard Widdopp my late husbands fouling peice ; to the said William Dixon my gray horse and vj li.; to Elizabeth, his wife, my sister, my new gowne cloth, my stammell petticoat and two of my best kine; to Issabell, wife of Richard Raden, my sister, my stuff gowne and xxs.; to William Pullein iiij li., to helpe him to mainteine his learninge; to Richard Dowager xxx s.; to Matthew Wood my gray maire and iij li.; to Francis Day vli., on condicon that he doe joine with Matthew Wood, otherwise the said legacie to be voyd; to my cossen, Eline Atkinson, widdow, xls. My mynde is that the poore people have penny dole dealt them at my buriall &c. The residue to Richard Rawden and Issabell, his wife, William Dixon and Elizabeth, his wife, my sisters, equallie to be devided betwixt them, and I make the said William and Elizabeth Dixon executors &c, and I make the said Francis Day and Matthew Wood supervisors &c. Witnesses, Fras. Day, Rob. Lolie, Math. Wood, Will. Pullein, Fras. Hardcastle, Will. Hemsley. Executors named admitted."[590] 
Married John Newall.[590] John died 1632, Darley, Co Yorkshire, England,[590] & buried 14/5/1632, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Will probated 7/5/1632, John Newall of Darley, yeoman.[590]
 "8 and 9 Charles I (1632-3). May 7, 1632.  I, John Newall of Darley, yeoman, to be buried at Hampsethwait. I give the lease of my house wherein I dwell and my fermhold with all the closes &c. belonging, in Darley, and those groundes in Clint now in my occupacon, called Jeffrey Closes, to Anne, my wife, and her executors &c, during my tearmes therein; to my said wife my interest which I have in Daiker of the demise of Dorithe Hardcastle, and those closes called Cornehills and Saurecarr ; to everie one of those fower daughters, which were my sister Marie Barnesleys daughters, xls. apeice, being in all viij li., and if any of them happen to die before they receive the same, then I give her parte or their partes to those of them that overlive ; to Richard Doungewell als. Dyker xx s., and I doe discharge him of such money as his parte comes to, for a foote of beefe of a fatt cow which he and widdow Barber and James Whelous bought of me, I discharge him of the payment of xxij s. enenst one rood of boardes he bought of me; to cossen Miles Bilton my grene cloake in Hew and stead of Bullice, my setting bitche, which my wife desires to kepe for my sake, and also two plow teames which are at Richard Dykers house. I give my sword to my loveing frend, George Braithwait, if he be liveing, and if he be dead to my said wife ; to Robert Peart and Elizabeth Younge, my servants, either of them a gimmer hogg; to the poore within this parishe, to the ould folkes ij d. apeice, and children and young folkes j d. apeice, and further to strangers poore that come to the buriall, at my wives and supervisors discretions ; to George Ellis of Burntyeates iiij s. The residue to Anne, my wife, whom I make my sole executrix &c. I make my loveing frends, Wilstopp Precious, my wives father at the Church at our marriage, and my cossen, Miles Bilton, supervisors &c, and I give either of them xls., &c. Witnesses, Wilstropp Precious, Rob. Lollie, John Metcalfe. Executrix named admitted."[590] 
Resided 1633, Darley, Co Yorkshire, England.[590] No issue mentioned in the wills of both Ann and John, indicating they almost certainly had no surviving issue.[590]

ii.

Isabel Bilton.[590] Mentioned in the will of Ann Newall nee Bilton, dated 25/11/1633.[590] Married Richard Rawden.[590] Had issue.[590]

iii.

Elizabeth Bilton.[590] Died 1635 & buried 19/5/1635, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Married William Dixon,[590] 21/11/1613, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[591] Executors of the will of Ann Newall nee Bilton, dated 25/11/1633, heirs in same.[590]
*
iv.

William Bilton,[586] probably born between 1580-1590. (from DOB of issue)
*
v.

David Bilton,[586] probably born between 1585-1595. (from DOB of issue)
vi.
Francis Bilton.[590] Alive 1618.[590] Mentioned in the will of his mother, dated 1618, also a co-executor of the same.[590] Listed in the will of his uncle, Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] Co-executor of the will of Francis Wood, probated 25/6/1632.[590]
 "8 and 9 Charles I (1632-3). June 25, 1632. I, Francis Wood of Timble, to be buried at Fuiston. I will my goodes be devided into three partes, one I give to my wife and the other two to goe towardes my funerall expences, debts &c, at the discretion of Francis Bilton, John Pullein, Thomas Watson and Elline, my wife. And whereas I have surrendered into their handes, to them and to their heires for ever, one messuage 84 a. and one auncient building lieing at Timble, upon condicon, till Michaell Sherifturne day, that if I be liveing then, the said surrender to be voyd or els to be presentid to their uses, to thintent that they shall stand seased of the same untill such time as they have discharged my debtes, which my goodes will not discharge nor extend to pay, when I will that my nece Atkinson shall have vli., if she be liveing, when she shall come to the age of 24 yeares, but if she live not to that age, to be voyd. After the payment of all my debtes &c. I will that such landes &c, as remaine of those surrendered, shalbe surrendered unto Anne Wood, my daughter, and to her heires. I make Elline, my wife, Francis Bilton, John Pullein and Thomas Watson, executors. Witnesses, Tho. Thompson, Tho. Richardson. Ellen Wood, John Pullein and Tho. Watson admitted as executors."[590] 
Married Isabell.[586] Isabell died 1659 & buried 14/7/1659, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (wife of Francis).[586]

   
Peckfield Cottages, Hampsthwaite
Peckfield Cottages, Hampsthwaite
Painting - Bernard Wilson
Stocks Green, Darley
Stocks Green, Darley
Image - undated postcard
Holme Hill Cottage, Darley
Holme Hill Cottage, Darley
Image - Darley Heritage Trail
Darley is a straggling village in the middle of Nidderdale in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire. Its westernmost end is Darley Head. The name Darley means "Deer-glade", "ley" is derived from "leah" which means woodland glade or clearing. Darley was one of the many settlements that were included in "The Forest of Knaresborough". Records of 1230 refer to Corn and Hay tithes being paid by surrounding villages but not by the people of Darley, suggesting that Darley was not an area of arable farming at that time. During the next few centuries Darley became an area of arable farming like many of the villages within the Forest of Knaresborough. However, by the early 16th Century Darley's open fields were enclosed. In 1634 Darley was on the main road between Ripon and Skipton although much of the time the road was impassable. Local Industries were often powered by water. This is still evident in the millponds, buildings, and landscape that still survive today. The Methodist chapel, built in 1829 and Christ Church, established as a chapel in 1849 are both still in use. There was also a Primitive Methodist Chapel (1841) and a Friends Meeting House. Darley has developed closely along the Main Street that runs east to west for approximately 2km. There are buildings in clusters from the late medieval times through to the Georgian and Victorian era to the post-war developments in the village.[Wikipedia, Darley]
   
   

1.3. Hugh Bilton,[617] probably born between 1560-1570. {Hugh was used interchangably with Henry} Died 1614 & buried 28/8/1614, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (Henry).[617] Hugh's will, dated 18/8/1614, names his wife as co-heir and executor & his son, William, to receive the bulk, but it also refers to his 'children'; other heirs include Elizabeth & William Dixon, Grace Hardcastle, Anne Atkinson, Richard Rawdon & his wife and Elizabeth Holme.[590]
  "11 and 12 James I (1613-14). Aug. 18, 1614. I, Hugh Bilton of Brame, to be buried at Fuiston. And as to my children I have prefered them all with porcons, saving that I am indebted to some of them which I will herein declare, and therefore I will that my debtes be payd of my whole goodes and then my goodes be devided into two equall partes, one I will my wiffe shall have, the other I will that my body shalbe honestly brought to the ground, and out of that which remayneth, I give unto William Dixon and Elizabeth, his wiffe, xl s.; to Grace Hardcastill iij s. iiij d.; to Anne Atkinson iij s. iiij d.; to Elizabeth Holme iij s. iiij d.; to Rich. Rawdon xs.; to his wiffe xs.; and to his sonne xs.; to William, my sonne, all my waynes, ploughes and husbandrie geare, savinge that I would have them used betwixt his mother and him for the necessary use of my land, and also I give him, more, all my household stuffe, savinge the pewther dublers and the beddinge, and that which shall remayne I give to Issabel, my wiffe, whom I do appoynt my whole executrix &c. Witnesses, Rob. Atkinson, Tho. Forest. Executrix named admitted."[590] 
{Note many of these names also appear in the will of Ann, widow of 1.2} On 20/1/1613-1614 was a witness & also named a co-supervisor (trustee) of the estate of John Inglesant, yeoman, of Fewston.[590] Married Isabel Jamson, 1591, Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[618] Isabel of Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[618] By licence.[618] Isabel was executor of her husband's will, 1614.[590] Resided 1618, Brame, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]

Children of Hugh/Henry Bilton & Isabel Jamson:
i.
 
child Bilton, baptised 27/12/1593, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (s/o Henrie).[617]
ii.

William Bilton,[590] born between 1591-1595 (from DOB issue & DOM parents). Named in his father's will, 1618.[590] Married unknown.
Children: (a)
 
William Bilton, baptised 14/11/1615, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617] Died 1686 & buried 4/6/1686, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
(b)
Ann Bilton, baptised 14/6/1618, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
(c)Dorothy Bilton, baptised 17/3/1621-1622, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
(d)John Bilton, baptised 22/6/1628, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
(e)Ann Bilton, baptised 27/6/1634, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
iii.

Ellen Bilton (presumed child),[617] probably born between 1591-1600. Married Francis Wood, 12/2/1616-1617, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
iv.

Elizabeth Bilton (presumed child),[617] probably born between 1591-1600. Married William Dixon, 21/11/1618, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
v.

Ann Bilton, baptised 1/1604-1605, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (d/o Heugh).[617]
vi.
Heugh Bilton, baptised 21/12/1600, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (s/o Henry).[617]
vii.
child Bilton.[617] Died 1607 & buried 8/9/1607, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (child of Hugh).[617]

viii.
child Bilton.[617] Died 1608 & buried 14/4/1608, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England (child of Henry).[617]
ix.David Bilton, baptised 19/12/1607, St Michael & St Lawrence, Co Yorkshire, England (s/o Henry).[617] Died 1618 & buried 6/11/1618, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]

   
Brame Hall, Fewston
Brame Hall, Fewston
Photograph - Google StreetView
Farm, Brame
Farm, Brame
Photograph - Google StreetView
Holy Trinity, Goodramgate
Holy Trinity, Goodramgate
Photograph - Martyn Gorman [Geograph]
Holy Trinity, Goodramgate. Founded in the first half of the 12th century, its architecture is that of the 13th and 14th centuries, with woodwork and pews of the 17th and 18th centuries. The church is a good example of how a church was arranged after the Reformation: dark, quiet, homely, with uneven floors, high box pews and plain walls. The churchyard is secluded behind rows of old buildings, accessed by narrow alleyways. The church dates back to the 12th century, although the current building owes rather more to the 13th-15th centuries: although part of the Chancel dates from the 12th century, the South Aisle and Chapel date from date from 1340, the Tower and North Aisle were built in the first half of the 15th century. The box pews are recorded as being repaired in 1633, and new ones added in 1700-1725. The church is in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust, having been declared redundant in 1971.[Wikipedia]
   
     

1.1.1. Miles Bilton (s/o Richard Bilton),[586] probably born between 1575-1580. (from DOB of issue) Died 1658, will dated 22/5/1658 & probated 19/1/1658-1659.[590]
 "Jan. 19, 1658-9. May 22, 1658. I, Miles Bilton, senr., of Hampstwait, yeoman. I give unto Elizabeth, my now wife, one newe house lately erected upon the common, called the Oven House, and half of one barne on the sayd common, dureing the tearme of her natureall lyfe, and after her decease to Thomas Bilton, my sonne, his heirs &c. The other half of the said barn or layth I give to my sonne Myles, his heirs &c. I give my waynes, carts, coopes, wheeles, ploughes, yokes, teames, harrowe and all other my husbandry geare, to Elizabeth, my now wife, and Miles, my sonne, to be equally devided betwixt them. Also to my sonne Myles vli.; to Edward Bilton, my sonne, vli.; to my daughter, Urselley Wharton, vli.; to my daughter, Marie Dickonson, vli.; to my daughter Margrett iiij li.; to my daughter Elizabeth, wife of John Wright, iij li., and I release unto her husband one bond wherein William Buckle, her former husband, stood bound to me for the payment of a certaine summe of money; to Francis Bilton, my sonne, xxs.; to each one of the children of my sonne, William Bilton, xiij s. iiij d.; to Thomas Bilton, my sonne, xx li.; to my daughter, Jane Bilton, xx li.; to my daughter, Issabell Bilton, xx li. All which severall givfts to be payd within one whole yeare next after my decease. The residue to my wyf, Elizabeth, whome I make sole executrix &c. Witnesses, Tho. Hardcastle, Will. Hardcastle, Math. Bland. Executrix named admitted."[590] 
Yeoman, 1658.[590] Married Isabella Atkinson, 31/10/1602, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Isabell died 1616 & buried 31/9/1616, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Married 2nd Elizabeth.[590] Elizabeth died after 1658.[590] Resided 1658, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]

Children of Miles Bilton & Isabella Atkinson:
i.
 
Ursuley Bilton, baptised 14/1/1604, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Died young.
ii.

Marie Bilton,[586] probably born between 1605-1610. Named in will of her father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married John Dickinson, 9/11/1630, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
Children: (a)
 
Anne Dickinson, baptised 11/4/1630, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(b)
Elizabeth Dickinson, baptised 20/10/1631, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(c)Myles Dickinson, baptised 10/7/1633, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(d)Isabell Dickinson, baptised 3/1/1635-1636, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(e)Ursula Dickinson, baptised 17/8/1637, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(f)William Dickinson, baptised 6/9/1640, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(g)John Dickinson, baptised 27/11/1642, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(h)Edward Dickinson, baptised 3/5/1645, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(i)David Dickinson, baptised 17/1/1646-1647, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(j)Thomas Dickinson, baptised 20/12/1649, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
iii.

William Bilton, baptised 16/3/1606, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589] Named in will of his father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married Mary Gibson, 22/8/1627, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Bilton, baptised 27/3/1627, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(b)
other issue (Will of William's father refers to William's "children".[590])
iv.

Francis Bilton, baptised 7/3/1610-1611, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1669/1670 & buried 20/2/1669-1670, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617] Named in will of his father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] On 21/10/1658 was listed as a godfather at the baptism of William, s/o Thomas Ward, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617] Married Susanna Oddye, 17/5/1632, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588] Susanna died 1685/1686 & buried 27/2/1685-1686, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
Children: (a)
 
daughter Bilton.[617] Died 1657 & buried 10/10/1657, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[617]
v.

Isabell Bilton, baptised 26/3/1615-1616, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1663 & buried 4/12/1663, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Named in will of her father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658 (unmarried).[590]
vi.
Urseley Bilton, baptised 16/2/1616-1617, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Named in will of her father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married Mr Wharton.[590]
vii.
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 21/3/1618-1619, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Named in will of her father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married 1st Mr Buckle.[590] Married 2nd John Wright, before 1658.[590] Resided 1654, Padside, Thornthwaite, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1657, Salterkell Hill, Thornthwaite, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Richard Wright, baptised 3/12/1654, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(b)
William Wright, baptised 20/5/1657, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(c)John Wright, baptised 30/5/1658, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
*
viii.
Edward Bilton, born before 1620.[586,587] {named in will of Miles Sr}
ix.Miles Bilton, baptised 28/4/1622, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1689 & buried 5/7/1689, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Named in will of his father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married Mary Bake, 17/11/1646, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588] Mary died 1688/1689 & buried 11/1/1688-1689, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Miles Boucocke, baptised 19/7/1640, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589] {Mother listed as Jane Boucocke & father Miles Bilton.[589]}
(b)
Dorothy Bilton, baptised 17/10/1647, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(c)Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 14/10/1651, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Married Thomas Anderson, 3/7/1671, St Michael & St Lawrence, Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England.[591,617]
(d)Sara Bilton, baptised 10/5/1659, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Married Thomas Spence, 7/6/1684, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (1)
 
Mary Spence, baptised 12/4/1685, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(2)
Miles Spence, baptised 13/2/1688, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(3)Frances Spence, baptised 1/1/1690, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(4)Thomas Spence, baptised 30/11/1692, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(5)Dorothy Spence, baptised 29/11/1696, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(6)Sarah Spence, baptised 21/12/1700, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

Children of Miles Bilton & Elizabeth:
*
i.
 
Thomas Bilton, baptised 29/10/1649, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

ii.

Jane Bilton, baptised 22/4/1654, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

   
All Saints, Ripley
All Saints, Ripley
Image - undated postcard
Pre-1820 dwelling, Ripley
Pre-1820 dwelling, Ripley
Photograph - Google StreetView
St Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge
St Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge
Photograph - David Rogers [Geograph]
Ripley is a village and civil parish in North Yorkshire in England, a few miles north of Harrogate. The name is thought to have been derived from 'Hrype', a tribe who inhabited the area c.500AD, 'Hrype leah' translating as 'field of the Hrypes', alternatively it originates from 'ripa lea', that is, 'the field by the bank of the river'. Black Douglas and his Scottish raiders virtually destroyed several of the local towns and villages in the 14th century. The Ingilbys, who had received Ripley Castle and the lands around it as a dowry when they married the heiress to the estate in 1308/9, resettled the village to its existing site. A castle dating from the 15th century, Ripley Castle, has been the home of the Ingilby family for 700 years. By 1825 many of the thatched houses and cottages were in a poor state: Sir William Amcotts Ingilby, a colourful eccentric and keen europhile, rebuilt the whole village, virtually from scratch. He had been much inspired by a model estate village that he had seen, apparently on his travels in Alsace-Lorraine. He combined architectural features from the castle with some less conventional ideas. The castle and the parish church were not affected by the reconstruction. The village centres around a cobbled market square. All Saints' Church occupies the whole of the southern side of the square. The church was moved to its present site c.1395.[Wikipedia, Ripley Castle] "Ripley, a village and a township in Knaresborough district, and a parish partly also in Pateley-Bridge district, w. R. Yorkshire. The village stands on the river Nidd, near the Nidd Valley railway, 5 miles W N W of Knaresborough; was once a market-town; became in great measure ruinous, and was mainly rebuilt about 1829; consists of one wide street, of very pleasing appearance: and has a post-office under Leeds, a railway station, a town hall built in 1841, a literary institution, and fairs on Easter Monday and 25 Aug. The township comprises 1,836 acres. Real property, 3, 163. Pop., 330. Houses, 57. The parish contains also the townships of Killinghall and Clint, and comprises 6, 836 acres. The manor of Ripley, with Ripley Castle, belongs to the Rev. H. J. Ingilby; and the manors of Killinghall and Clint belong to the Duke of Devonshire. Ripley Castlewas erected in 1555, by Sir W. Ingilby; gave lodging for a night to Oliver Cromwell, after the battle of Marston-Moor; and is now a spacious and handsome mansion, retaining only the great tower and the lodge of its original fortifications. The land is noted for the cultivation of liquorice. The church is old but good; consists of nave, aisles, tran-sept, and chancel, with porches and embattled tower. There are a Wesleyan chapel, two endowed schools with 206 and 40 a year, and charities 52. The alchemist Ripley and Arch-bishop Pullen were natives."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer]
     
St Cuthbert, Pateley Bridge
St Cuthbert, Pateley Bridge
Image - undated postcard
High Street, Pateley Bridge
High Street, Pateley Bridge
Photograph - Chris Heaton [Geograph]
Saltergate Hill farm
Saltergate Hill farm
Photograph - Google StreetView
Pateley Bridge is a small market town in Nidderdale in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England, on the River Nidd. The River Nidd, from the word for sparkling, was given its name by the Celts , but it wasn’t until Anglo-Saxon times that real settlement in the area began. The land was acquired by the Archbishop of York before the Norman Conquest, and his manor became known as Bishopside – hence the parish name of High and Low Bishopside rather than Pateley Bridge. Pateley was first recorded in the 12th century. It takes its name from the Old English paa-leah, meaning "clearing near the paths" and referring to paths up Nidderdale and from Ripon to Craven, which intersected here. In 1320 the Archbishop of York granted a charter for a market and fair at Pateley. The parish is bounded on the west by the River Nidd, and includes a large area of moorland to the east of the town. Other settlements in the parish include the southern part of Wath, Glasshouses, Wilsill, Blazefield and Fell Beck. Greenhow Hill has a long history of quarrying and lead mining since Roman times, and Nidderdale lead had been used to roof Windsor Castle in 1363. Throughout the 19th century, Pateley Bridge was a highly industrialised small town, however, by the 1880s the lead mines were in terminal decline, followed twenty years later by many of the quarries.[Wikipedia, Pateley Bridge] The Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Pateley Bridge. There was first mention of a parochial chapel here in 1320, although it is possible there was one earlier. The original building suggests a simple almost square form. Part of the church was reconstructed in the seventeenth century, and the tower was added in 1691. Three galleries were added in 1724. The church began to fall into decay at the start of the nineteenth century and it was closed in 1826 when it became too small for the congregation, too expensive to repair and too inconvenient to reach. A fifteenth century bell from the old church now rests in St. Cuthbert’s, Pateley Bridge.[Friends of Pateley Bridge] "Pateley Bridge, a town, a chapelry, a sub-district, and a district, in W. R. Yorkshire. The town stands on the river Nidd, at the terminus of the Nidd Valley railway, 11 miles S W by W of Ripon; consists chiefly of one street, going down a steep descent towardthe river; is a polling-place; and has a post-office‡ under Leeds, a railway station with telegraph, a banking office, two chief inns, a bridge, two churches, Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist chapels, a mechanics' institute, a free school, and a workhouse. The old church was recently restored, and is used only for burial service. The new church was built in 1827, at a cost of 4,000; is in the pointed style; and consists of nave, three aisles, and chancel, with a tower. A weekly market is held on Saturday; a well-attended fair, for sheep and cattle, is held on every alternate Saturday; brewing and flax-spinning are carried on; and numerous lead mines and large quarries are in the neighbourhood. The manor belongs to the Archbishop of York. A moor of upwards of 4,000 acres has been enclosed; and extensive stalactitic caverns, at Stump-Cross, were discovered in 1860."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer] Saltergate Hill Farmhouse, Hampsthwaite. Dates to the mid 17th century and partly rebuilt in the early 1800s. Built of coursed squared gritstone with a stone slate roof. An L-shaped, 2-storey house with bays. The ground-floor and first-floor rooms at the north end of the east front contain the earliest features. A 1600s built-in panelled corner cupboard with cocks-head hinges is a rare survival.[British Listed Buildings]
   
   

1.2.1. William Bilton (s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[586] probably born between 1580-1590. (from DOB of issue) Died 1623 & buried 27/7/1623, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Administration granted, "20 and 21 James I (1622-1623). Margaret Bilton, relict of William Bilton of Whitewall, is admitted as administratrix of his effects."[590] Mentioned in the will of his mother, dated 1618, also a witness of the same.[590] On 7/1/1632-1633 was a witness to the will of Richard Dukesbury of Felliscliffe.[590] Married Margret Robinson, 27/11/1609, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Margaret died 1670 & buried 4/10/1670, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Margaret mentioned in the will of her mother-in-law, 1618.[590] Margaret remarried to Thomas Emote (Emmott).[590] Thomas died 1658 & buried 2/5/1658, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1623, Whitewall, Felliscliffe, Co Yorkshire, England.[590] Margaret resided 1635, Felliscliffe, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]

Children of William Bilton & Margaret Robinson:
i.
 
Elinor Bilton, baptised 21/4/1612, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Mentioned in the will of her grandmother, Ann Bilton, dated 1618.[590] Mentioned in the will of her cousin, Ann Newall nee Bilton, dated 25/11/1633, Elin was at the time a widow.[590] Married Mr Atkinson.[590]
ii.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 2/2/1616-1617, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1635 & buried 2/11/1635, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Mentioned in the will of her grandmother, Ann Bilton, dated 1618.[590]
iii.

Abraham Bilton, baptised 8/8/1619, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
iv.

Ann Bilton, baptised 22/8/1619, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] "The Tuition of Ann Bilton. March 9, 11 Charles I (1635). Anne Bilton, one of the daughters of William Bilton of Whitewall in Felliscliffe, deceased, chooses Thomas Emote of Beckhouse, who married Margaret Bilton, her mother, to be her guardian."[590] Married Thomas Skayfe, 25/5/1637, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Was a witness to the will of Miles Waite of Felliscliff, dated 2/3/1656 & probated 16/9/1657.[590]
Children: (a)
 
Magdalen Skaife, baptised 30/12/1638, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589] Married John Richmond, 20/2/1665, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(b)
Thomas Skaife, baptised 17/4/1642, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(c)Samuel Skaife, baptised 3/5/16, baptised 46, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(d)Thomas Skaife, baptised 23/5/1652, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(e)Robert Skaife, baptised 29/10/1654, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
(f)Marie Skaife, baptised 11/5/1661, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589]
v.

William Bilton, baptised 5/11/1620, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1688 & buried 12/10/1688, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (Senior).[586] Junior, 1657, 1658.[586,590] Senior, 1688.[586] In 1658 was a co-executor of the will of Nicholas Yeoman of Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[590]
 "Oct. 25, 1658. I, Nicholas Yeoman of Hampstwait, to be buried at Hampstwait. For my worldly goods and the proffitts of my copiehold land for the tear me of 10 yeares, surrendered to William Burton, William Bilton of Clapham Greene, junr., and Thomas Thackerey, as by the trust imposed in them inroold with the surrender more at lardge doth appeare, I give as followeth. To my sonnes eldest daughter, Elizabeth Yeoman, dli., to be payd to her when she corns to the age of 21 years, if she be living and be not a papish or maryed to a papish, as by the trust more at large doeth appeare; but if it cann be raysed sooner my will is that it be payd her when shee maries, if shee marie not a papish. To ray sonne daughter, Marie Yeoman, ccccli., to be payd to her when shee corns to the age of 21 yeare, if shee bee then living and be not a papish or maried to a papish. If either Marie or Elizabeth Yeoman die before they marie or accomplish the age of 21 yeares, my will is that the dead portion shall be equally devided betwixt the survivor and my grandchild, John Yeoman. I give to my grandchild, John Yeoman, my freehold land in Hampstwaite for his education; to Peter Yeoman vli.; to John Foster vli.; to my brother Francis my cloke ; to my brother Anthonie all the rest of my close and xij s. yearely dureing his naturall life ; to William Burton vli.; to William Bilton vli.; to Thomas Thackerey vli. If any defalcation to be defalked out of [my] sonne daughter, Marie Yeoman, portion, if any over plus [the same] to be given to my sonne sonne, John Yeoman. I make William Burton, William Bilton, Thomas Thackerey, executors. March 20, 1657, in the presence of George Hardestie, Thomas Pott. Executors named admitted."[590] 
Married Isabell Lewtie, 28/7/1655, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Witnesses Lawrence Favill, William Lewtie & Leonard Atkinson.[586] Isabel died 1709 & buried 27/3/1707, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (widow).[586] Both resided Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1658, Clapham Green, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Isabell Bilton.[586] Died 1656 & buried 26/11/1656, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(b)
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 26/11/1656, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(c)William Bilton, baptised 6/2/1657-1658, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(d)Ellen Bilton, baptised 5/8/1660, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[589] Died 1683 & buried 23/12/1683, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(e)Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 16/3/1661-1662, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
(f)Mary Bilton, baptised 17/12/1665, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
vi.
Joseph Bilton, baptised 15/10/1622, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

     
White Wall Farm, Felliscliffe
White Wall Farm, Felliscliffe
Photograph - Google StreetView
Marston Hall, White Wall Lane, Felliscliffe
Marston Hall, White Wall Lane, Felliscliffe
Photograph - Google StreetView
Cottage, Clapham Green
Cottage, Clapham Green
Photograph - Google StreetView
Felliscliffe is a civil parish in North Yorkshire, England, in Nidderdale, Harrogate borough. It is an ancient Nidderdale township, first mentioned in the Domesday Book as 'Fyle's gyffe', later, 'Felagh's cliff' from the Old Norse. It is about four miles south-west of Ripley and seven miles from Knaresborough, close to the village of Hampsthwaite outside the spa town of Harrogate. The parish includes the village of Kettlesing and part of the US intelligence-gathering base at Menwith Hill. The parish served the nearby Fountains Abbey with flax, with monastery paths leading along Tang Beck - a tributary of the River Nidd - still in existence. Traces of Iron Age and Roman settlements have been discovered in the parish, indicating that it has been inhabited continuously for several millennia.[Wikipedia] "Felliscliffe, a township in Hampsthwaite parish, W. R. Yorkshire; 3 miles SW of Ripley. It includes the hamlets of Kettlesing, Swincliffe, and West Syke-Green. Acres, 2, 320. Real property, 2, 835. Pop., 347. Houses, 83."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer]
   
   

1.2.2. David Bilton (s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[586,593] probably born between 1585-1595. (from DOB of issue) Died 1658/1659 & buried 4/3/1658-1659, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (Sr).[586] Mentioned in the will of his mother, dated 1618, also a co-executor of the same.[590] Was a witness & co-executor of the will of his uncle, Richard Bilton, 1628.[590] On 3/6/1634 was a witness to the will of William Birdsall, yeoman, of Felliscliffe.[590] Married Dorothy Waite, 21/2/1613-1614, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589,593] David resided Fewston, Co Yorkshire, England, at the time of his marriage.[593] Dorothy mentioned in the will of her mother-in-law, 1618.[590]

Children of David Bilton & Dorothy Waite:
i.
 
William Bilton, baptised 6/9/1618, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1663 & buried 23/11/1663, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (Sr).[586] Married Hellen.[586] Hellen died 1673 & buried 31/5/1673, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (widow).[586] Resided 1663, 1673, Clapham Green, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
ii.

Anne Bilton, baptised 12/3/1619-1620, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1623 & buried 8/2/1623, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
* iii.

David Bilton, baptised 2/2/1622-1623, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589,593]
iv.

Francis Bilton, baptised 18/6/1626, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1698 & buried 13/4/1698, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Was a witness to the will of Miles Waite of Felliscliff, dated 2/3/1656 & probated 16/9/1657.[590] Married Elizabeth Harrison, 14/2/1654-1655, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Francis, s/o David, resided Fencliffe, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Witnesses Robert Farnell, John Catton & William Ripley.[587] (David or one of the witnesses was mayor of Ripon, Co Yorkshire, England, likely one of the witnesses.[586]) Elizabeth, d/o Thomas, born 1632, Fenscliffe, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England,[586] died 1657 & buried 6/10/1657, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (wife of Francis).[586] Married 2nd Elizabeth.[586] Elizabeth died 1703 & buried 7/3/1703, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1655, Fenscliffe, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1666, Clapham Green, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Dorothy Bilton, baptised 16/8/1657, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(b)
Frances Bilton, baptised 30/6/1661, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
(c)Francis Bilton, baptised 5/4/1663, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1666 & buried 25/10/1666, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

     
   

1.1.1.1. Edward Bilton (s/o Miles Bilton, s/o Richard Bilton), born before 1620.[586,587] Named in will of his father, Miles Bilton, probated 22/5/1658.[590] Married unknown.

Children of Edward Bilton:
i.
 
Edward Bilton.[587] {Presumed son - of the next generation & living in same parish} Married unknown.
Children: (a)
 
Edward Bilton, baptised 21/10/1682, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(b)
Anne Bilton, baptised 20/9/1684, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(c)John Bilton, baptised 15/7/1686, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Married Elizabeth Steel, 18/5/1710, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
Children: (1)
 
Elizabeth Bilton, born 22/1/1712-1713, baptised 6/2/1712, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(2)
Anne Bilton, born 17/11/1722, baptised 9/12/1722, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(3)Charles Bilton, born 23/1/1723, baptised 30/1/1723, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(4)Lambert Bilton, born 22/1/1727, baptised 16/2/1727, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(5)John Bilton, born 31/5/1729, baptised 26/6/1729, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(6)Miriam Bilton, baptised 30/12/1731, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(7)Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 9/8/1733, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(8)Hannah Bilton, baptised 29/7/1736, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(d)Sarah Bilton, baptised 18/11/1688, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(e)Alice Bilthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leedson, baptised 27/8/1691, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
(f)William Bilton, baptised 17/2/1694, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
* ii.

John Bilton, baptised 1/8/1641, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
iii.

Miles Bilton, baptised 28/1/1643-1644, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
iv.

Lambert Bilton, baptised 22/11/1653, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Married Sarah Ripley, 29/10/1677, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
Children: (a)
 
Ann Bilton, born 2/8/1678, baptised 12/8/1678, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1678 & buried 15/8/1678, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(b)
Sarah Bilton, born 5/9/1679, baptised 11/9/1679, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(c)Stephen Bilton, born 25/1/1682, baptised 2/2/1682, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1682 & buried 9/2/1682, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(d)John Bilton, born 21/3/1683, baptised 1/1/1683, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1684 & buried 20/10/1684, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(e)Elizabeth Bilton, born 2/9/1685, baptised 24/9/1685, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(f)William Bilton, born 21/11/1687, baptised 14/12/1687, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1691 & buried 27/4/1691, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(g)Lambert Bilton, born 8/3/1689, baptised 25/3/1689, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Married unknown.
Children: (1)
 
Lambert Bilton, born 15/10/1719, baptised 11/11/1719, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(2)
John Bilton, born 13/2/1722, baptised 1/3/1722, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(3)William Bilton, born 29/1/1724, baptised 20/2/1724, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(4)James Bilton, born 10/9/1726, baptised 7/10/1726, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(5)Thomas Bilton, 30/7/1728, baptised 22/8/1728, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(6)Benjamin Bilton, born 26/1/1729, baptised 12/12/1729, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1730 & buried 26/1/1730, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(h)Edward Bilton, born 4/7/1690, baptised 24/7/1690, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Married Sarah Hawker, 20/12/1715, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
Children: (1)
 
Anne Bilton, born 8/10/1717, baptised 31/10/1717, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(2)
male Bilton, born 8/6/1719, baptised 24/6/1719, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(3)Lambert Bilton, born 18/8/1723, baptised 11/9/1723, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(4)George Bilton, born 10/6/1727, baptised 6/7/1727, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(i)Hannah Bilton, born 18/2/1693, baptised 2/3/1693, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(j)Mary Bilton, born 3/12/1695, baptised 26/12/1695, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(k)Martha Bilton, born 31/1/1699, baptised 16/2/1699, St Peter, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]

   
Leeds, early 1700s
Leeds, early 1700s
Engraving - Ralph Thoresby
Old Houses in Briggate, Leeds
Old Houses in Briggate, Leeds
Drawing - T.C. Farrer, 1885
Old St Peter's, Leeds
Old St Peter's, Leeds
Artist unknown [Leeds in Pictures]
St Peter's, Leeds. Christians have worshiped in this area for well-over a thousand years. An early 7th century church on this site was burned down in 633 AD. In 1086 Leeds had a church with a priest, a manor and meadowland. This church was altered, added to and rebuilt over the medieval period as the village grew into a busy market town. The church was rebuilt after a fire in the 14th century. The town expanded westwards and two new churches were built, St John’s opened in 1634, and Holy Trinity in 1727. In common with many other Yorkshire churches, the Parish Church of St Peter served a vast parish, covering some 34 square miles and including a number of outlying villages and their land. Some of these had their own chapels, but St Peter’s remained the mother church. By the 19th century, the church was large but dirty, cluttered and somewhat unsafe. The town had developed into a major industrial city, busy, smoky, smelly and very unhealthy. When a new Vicar arrived in 1838 he soon realised that the building could not be adapted to his needs. A new church, with over 1600 seats, was consecrated in 1841 and continues to serve the city.[St Peter's, Wikipedia] Leeds is a city and metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, Leeds can trace its recorded history to the 5th century when the Kingdom of Elmet was covered by the forest of "Loidis", the origin of the name Leeds. The name has been applied to many administrative entities over the centuries. It changed from being the appellation of a small manorial borough, in the 13th century, through several incarnations, to being the name attached to the present metropolitan borough. In the 17th and 18th centuries Leeds became a major centre for the production and trading of wool. Then, during the Industrial Revolution, Leeds developed into a major industrial centre; wool was still the dominant industry but flax, engineering, iron foundries, printing, and other industries were important. From being a compact market town in the valley of the River Aire in the 16th century Leeds expanded and absorbed the surrounding villages to become a populous urban centre by the mid-20th century. The name Leeds derives from "Loidis", the name given to a forest covering most of the Brythonic kingdom of Elmet, which existed during the 5th century into the early 7th century. Bede states in the fourteenth chapter of his Historia ecclesiastica, in a discussion of an altar surviving from a church erected by Edwin of Northumbria, that it is located in "...regione quae vocatur Loidis", the region known as Loidis. Leeds developed as a market town in the Middle Ages as part of the local agricultural economy. Prior to the Industrial Revolution it had become a co-ordination centre for the making of woollen cloth. Leeds was handling one sixth of England's export trade in 1770. Growth, initially in textiles, was accelerated by the building canals in 1699 and later the railways.[Wikipedia]
   
   

1.1.1.2. Thomas Bilton (s/o Miles Bilton, s/o Richard Bilton), baptised 29/10/1649, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Married Elizabeth Ellis, 30/11/1676, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, Co Yorkshire, England, England.[203]

Children of Thomas Bilton & Elizabeth Ellis:
*
i.
 
Miles Bilton, baptised 23/2/1677, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588]

ii.

Lucia Bilton, baptised 1/2/1679, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588] Married Henry Arton, 1/10/1722, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Henry a yeoman, both resided Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

iii.

William Bilton, baptised 26/12/1693, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588] Died 1694 & buried 13/8/1694, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588]

   
   

1.2.2.1. David Bilton (s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 2/2/1622-1623, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,588,593] Died 1698 & buried 13/4/1698, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] On 3/1/1648 "Richard Hardakers of Hampesthwait and David Bilton, junr., were admitted as guardians of William, son of Thomas Potts of Isegate, deceased."[590] Was a witness to the will of Miles Waite of Felliscliff, dated 2/3/1656 & probated 16/9/1657.[590] Junior, 1658.[586] Married Mary.[586] Mary died 1695 & buried 9/11/1695, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

Children of David Bilton & Mary:
*
i.
 
William Bilton, baptised 3/4/1658, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

ii.

Marie Bilton, baptised 14/7/1660, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

iii.

John Bilton, born c.1662, baptised 26/12/1663, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1743/1744 & buried 8/1/1743-1744, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (81yo).[586] Yeoman, 1743/1744.[586] Married Ann Harrison, 10/7/1703, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Ann born c.1684, died 1746, Hurst, Co Yorkshire, England, & buried 16/4/1746, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (62yo, widow).[586] Resided 1703, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1704, Felliscliff, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1743, 1746, Hurst, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Bilton, baptised 23/7/1704, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Married Christopher Metcalfe, 9/11/1727, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Christopher of Masham, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
Francis Metcalfe, baptised 19/11/1728, Saints Mary and Alkelda, Middleham, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(b)
Elizabeth Metcalfe, baptised 12/7/1731, Saints Mary and Alkelda, Middleham, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(c)Jene Metcalfe, baptised 24/1/1736, Saints Mary and Alkelda, Middleham, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
*
iv.

Robert Bilton, baptised 1672, All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest, Co Yorkshire, England.[593]

     
Church Lane, Hampsthwaite
Church Lane, Hampsthwaite
Postcard - artist unknown
Hurst, near Dacre
Hurst, near Dacre
Photograph - Google StreetView
St Mary and St Alkeda, Middleham
St Mary and St Alkeda, Middleham
Photograph - Bill Henderson [Geograph]
Middleham is a small market town and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire. There has been a settlement there since Roman Britain. It was recorded in the Domesday book as "Medelai". The first known settlement at Middleham was during the Roman Era. The IXth Legion of the Roman Army conquered York in 69 AD and moved north quickly. A branch road of the Great North Road passed through Middleham to Bainbridge. Near Middleham, the Romans built a guard station to control traffic on the River Ure. In 1069, the land in the area of Middleham was given to William the Conqueror's nephew, Alan Rufus. Rufus built a wooden motte-and-bailey castle above the town, whose earthworks are still visible today and called "William's Hill". The present castle which dominates the town, Middleham Castle, was started in 1190. The Nevilles, Earls of Westmoreland, acquired it in the 13th century. It was called the "Windsor of the North". The castle is now a ruin, after having been dismantled in 1646. The keep, which was built by Robert Fitz Ralph in the 1170s survives to this day along the 13th century chapel and the 14th century gatehouse. At the time of King Richard III, Middleham was a bustling market town and important political centre. As early as 1389 the lord of Middleham Manor received a grant from the crown to hold a weekly market in the town and a yearly fair on the feast of St. Alkelda the Virgin. Most buildings in the old part of Middleham were built after 1600, though the old rectory of the church has some mediaeval elements incorporated into it. In 1607 it is documented that Middleham was important enough to have a Royal Court. The Church of Saints Mary and Alkelda was founded in 1291 and today is mainly of 14th and 15th century architecture, though there are a few stones indicating the existence of a church on that site perhaps a century before that.[Wikipedia]
   
   

1.1.1.1.1. John Bilton (s/o Edward Bilton, s/o Miles Bilton, s/o Richard Bilton), baptised 1/8/1641, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Married Ellinor Townson, 1/3/1663, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]

Children of John Bilton & Ellinor Townson:
*
i.
 
Miles Bilton,[596] baptised 6/11/1670, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
ii.

Sarah Bilton, baptised 7/11/1672, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
iii.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 15/11/1674, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]
iv.

John Bilton, baptised 5/2/1677, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Died 1677 & buried 6/2/1677, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587]

   
   

1.1.1.2.1. Miles Bilton (s/o Thomas Bilton, s/o Miles Bilton, s/o Richard Bilton), baptised 23/2/1677, Saint Mary The Virgin, Pateley Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[588] Labourer, 1719.[586] Married unknown. Resided 1710, 1716, 1719, Thornthwaite, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

Children of Miles Bilton:
i.
 
Miles Bilton,[596] baptised 5/11/1710, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Yeoman, 1765,1781,1784.[597,606]
 On 10/5/1765 Joseph Shires sold the mortgage on property in Heyshaw & Dacre to Miles, "From Joseph Shires of Pasehouse or Rexgillend in the parish of Fewston, yeoman, executor of William Shires, deceased, to Miles Bilton of Heyshaw, yeoman, of a messuage and lands in Heyshaw and Dacre Pasture for the remainder of a term of 1300 years created by a lease of 3 Feb 1 James I from Sir William Ingilby to Thomas Oddy, paying 16s 8d to Sir William's heirs."[606] 
On 26/11/1781 Miles & his son, William, assigned the mortgage on property in Heyshaw & Dacre (both in Co Yorkshire, England) to Elizabeth Scaife (probably a distant kinswoman, Elizabeth Skaife), "From Miles Bilton of Heyshaw, yeoman, and William Bilton his son, to Elizabeth Scaife of Otley, spinster, of 2 messuages and lands in Heyshaw and Dacre Pasture for the remainder of a term of 1300 years created by a lease of 3 Feb I James I from Sir William Ingilby to Thomas Oddy, to secure 300."[597,606]
On 5/4/1784 Miles, his only child, William, & Elizabeth Scaife assigned the mortgage on property in Heyshaw & Dacre (both in Co Yorkshire, England) to William and George Whitley, "From Miles Bilton of Heyshaw, yeoman, William Bilton his only child, and Elizabeth Scafe of Otley, spinster, to William and George Whitley of Heyshaw, yeomen, of 2 messuages and lands in Heyshaw and Dacre Pasture for the remainder of a term of 1300 years created in a lease of 3 Feb 1 James I from Sir William Ingilby to Thomas Oddy."[606]
On 7/9/1791 was mentioned in the will of John Lowcock of Thrusscross, "John Lowcock of Thrusscross, Farmer. All my real and personal estate to my executors Joseph Dinsdale of Thrusscross, and William Pullen of Blubberhouses, chargeable with : 5s to my nephew Humphrey Eightson, who owes me 55. He is to pay interest on that amount to my executors for the use of my brother William Lowcock. 5s to Alice Simpson, the wife of James Simpson. 12 to my uncle Miles Bilton. The residue of my estate and effects to be sold by my executors and the interest on the sum invested to go to my brother William. Witnesses William Bake, George Demain, Isabel Demain."[611]
Married Jane Bake,[596] 24/5/1742, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Jane died 1798 & buried 25/2/1798, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Resided 1742, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1743, Thornthwaite, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1765,1781,1784, Heyshaw, Co Yorkshire, England.[597,606]
Children: (a)
 
William Bilton, baptised 11/9/1743, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Died 1815 & buried 30/7/1815, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England (72yo).[586]
 On 26/11/1781 William & father, Miles, assigned the mortgage on property in Heyshaw & Dacre (both in Co Yorkshire, England) to Elizabeth Scaife (probably a distant kinswoman, Elizabeth Skaife), "From Miles Bilton of Heyshaw, yeoman, and William Bilton his son, to Elizabeth Scaife of Otley, spinster, of 2 messuages and lands in Heyshaw and Dacre Pasture for the remainder of a term of 1300 years created by a lease of 3 Feb I James I from Sir William Ingilby to Thomas Oddy, to secure 300."[597,606] 
On 5/4/1784 Miles, his only child, William, & Elizabeth Scaife assigned the mortgage on property in Heyshaw & Dacre (both in Co Yorkshire, England) to William and George Whitley, "From Miles Bilton of Heyshaw, yeoman, William Bilton his only child, and Elizabeth Scafe of Otley, spinster, to William and George Whitley of Heyshaw, yeomen, of 2 messuages and lands in Heyshaw and Dacre Pasture for the remainder of a term of 1300 years created in a lease of 3 Feb 1 James I from Sir William Ingilby to Thomas Oddy."[606]
Married Elizabeth Veepon, 6/6/1770, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] William s/o Miles & Jane, Elizabeth d/o Edward.[596] Elizabeth born c.1745, died 1810 & buried 4/10/1810, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Marriage also registered Rippon, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
Children: (1)
 
Edward Bilton, born 3/7/1772, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1847 & buried 10/2/1847, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England (74yo).[586] Married Ann.[586] Ann born c.1777, died 1847 & buried 4/4/1847, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England (70yo).[586]
(2)
Elizabeth Bilton, born 1/6/1773, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1773 & buried 14/2/1795, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England (22yo).[586]
(3)William Bilton, born 16/10/1774, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(4)Jane Bilton, born 23/1/1776, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Married Joseph Dougill, 24/8/1803, Brighouse, near Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Jane d/o William & Elizabeth, Joseph of Darley, Co Yorkshire, England, s/o John & Grace.[592]
 Joseph's will, written 25/11/1820 & probated 2/6/1822, "Joseph Dougill of Darley, Yeoman. I appoint my wife Jane Dougill and my brother-in-law James Bilton of Bradford, Trustees and Executors. To my wife Jane all my household furniture, plate and linen. To my son John Dougill the real estate I was given by my father, John Dougill, in Darley, chargeable with and annuity of 20 to my wife. Should my son die a minor then the same real estate to go to my wife. Witnesses James Myers, Francis Thorp, Joseph Spence. Died 2nd June 1822. Probate 26th June 1822. Effects under 100. Inventory by Joseph Walker and James Bilton."[607] 
(5)Hannah Bilton, born 11/4/1778, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1803 & buried 6/8/1803, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England (25yo).[586]
(6)John Bilton, born 28/7/1779, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(7)Joseph Bilton, born 9/2/1781, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(8)Joshua Bilton, born 29/6/1782, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
 Named in the will of his mother-in-law, Jane Shilleto, dated 6/12/1821 & probated 28/2/1828, "Jane Shilleto of Selby, Widow. To my son John Shilleto 100. A half share of my real estate at Beckwithshaw to my son-in-law Joshua Bilton and my daughter Patience Bilton. The other half share to my daughter Sarah Shilleto. Also all my goods, chattels, and personal estate. I appoint my daughters as executors. Witnesses Rebecca Wiseman, John Armstrong, William Mitton. Probated York 28th February 1828."[609] 
Married Patience Shilleto,[608] 22/8/1817, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Patience born 1788.[592]
(9)Martha Bilton, born 7/2/1784, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(10)James Bilton, born 30/7/1785, Quaker (Non-conformist) church, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] On 25/11/1820 was appointed executor of his brother-in-law's will, Joseph Dougill.[607]
(11)Ann Bilton, born 18/7/1792, Quakers church, Bradford, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
ii.

William Bilton, baptised 23/12/1716, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
iii.

Robert Bilton, baptised 28/6/1719, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

     
St Saviour's, Thornthwaite
St Saviour's, Thornthwaite
Photograph - Ian S [Geograph]
Fields,Thornthwaite
Fields,Thornthwaite
Photograph - Mick Armitage [Geograph]
Dacre Pasture
Dacre Pasture
Photograph - Mick Armitage [Geograph]
Thornthwaite. St Saviour's was built in 1810 on the site of a much earlier chapel, which existed as early as 1409.[Georgaph] "Thornthwaite, a township, a chapelry, and a sub-district, in Pateley-Bridge district, W. R. Yorkshire. The township lies 2 miles W by S of Darley railway station, and 4 S by E of Pateley-Bridge; and is called Thornthwaite-with-Padside. Acres, 1,960. Pop., 257. Houses, 56. The chapelry extends much beyond the township, and is in Hampsthwaite parish. Post town, Ripley, under Leeds. Pop., 930. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon. Value, 109. Patron, the Vicar of Hampsthwaite. The sub-district contains 4 townships. Acres, 12,450. Pop., 1,925. Houses, 438."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer] Dacre is a hill top village known locally as Dacre Top to distinguish it from Dacre Banks close to the River Nidd. The focus of modern Dacre has moved to the more sheltered settlement of Dacre Banks where the shops, church etc are located. The most historic house in Dacre Top is likely to be Dacre Hall. now mostly Georgian but of medieval or earlier origin. There is evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age inhabitation at Dacre. There is extensive evidence of medieval iron smelting from the time when Dacre was a grange of Fountains Abbey near Ripon, one of the most prominent Cistercian monasteries in England. There are also indications of possible iron smelting activity at other times including the Roman and Viking eras. After the suppression of the monasteries, much of the land around Dacre eventually came into the hands of the Ingilby family. When the Ingilbys took control of the old monastic lands in the late 16th century the iron industry in Nidderdale was in decline but it does appear that they continued to operate the existing facilities some time.[Iron Age Nidderdale]
   
Farmland, Heyshaw
Farmland, Heyshaw
Photograph - Chris Heaton [Geograph]
Quaker burial ground, Dacre
Quaker burial ground, Dacre
Photograph - Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Kirkgate, Knaresborough
Kirkgate, Knaresborough
Photograph - author unstated [Wikipedia]
Heyshaw is situated about 10 kms northwest of Harrogate. in 1945 the hamlet of Heyshaw, with a population of just 24, consisted of 6 farms and 2 cottages, some dating to the mid 1600s. The grassland at Heyshaw is 800 ft above sea level and 1,100 ft on the moorland. In 1884 Heyshaw Moor had a quarry called Guys Cliff Quarry.[Visitor UK] Quaker burial ground at Dacre. The burial ground surrounded by a drystone wall which rises at one point to allow for a door. On the lintel is carved the date 1685. The first recorded burial on this site was in 1688 and the last in 1842. It is thought that over 140 people were buried here. Despite the number of burials, there are only two original stones visible. Those along the wall side appear to have been moved here recently from another old burial ground at nearby Darley. Even the gravestones reflect the plain and simple style preferred by the quakers. Close by was once the meeting house, erected in 1696 and demolished around 1860.[Geograph, Geograph]
    
Gracious Street, Knaresborough
Gracious Street, Knaresborough
Photograph - 'wfmillar' [Geograph]
Friends Meeting House, Quakers Lane, Rawdon
Friends Meeting House, Rawdon
Photograph - Rich Tea [Geograph]
Quaker burial ground, Birds Royd Lane, Rastrick
Quaker burial ground, Rastrick
Photograph - Humphrey Bolton [Geograph]
Quakerism developed from the teachings of George Fox and attracted people often of independent means and minds, weavers, small farmers and yeoman who lived in the Nidderdale. All were searching for a more meaningful form of religion and worship. By about 1652 a"settled" meeting was set up in the Skipton area of North Yorkshire. In the same year Thomas Taylor became an early convert and ministered in Nidderdale. Christopher Taylor, brother of Thomas, ministered in Dacre, Hartwith and Felliscliffe. By 1669 Knaresborough had two congregations, one at Skipton and a second at Knaresborough. A refusal to pay tithes, swear the Oath of Allegiance and take off a hat saw Quakers branded as trouble makers and therefore at odds with the local Magistrates. They were persecuted by heavy fines, imprisoned and had goods sequstrated. By 1689 the Act of Toleration allowed Meeting Houses to be Registered as places for worship. The Meeting House at Knaresburgh was registered that year. In 1697 a "new erected house in Dacre-cum-Bewerley " was "recorded as a place for religious worship". Quakers built on land at Dacre pasture north of the burial ground which they had aquired in 1697. In 1804 a new meeting house was built at Darley. The Darley Meeting house closed in 1876. In 1950 the Meeting House was sold but the burial ground remains in the hands of the Society of Friends until 2004 when the remaining grave markers were moved to Dacre. The Rawdon Meeting House is a rare surviving 1600s Quaker Meeting House. Originally part of Knaresborough Monthly Meeting, which at one time included Netherdale (Darley), Askwith, Keighley and Farfield. From 1798 Rawdon Meeting, whilst within Knaresborough Monthly Meeting, was entitled Rawden and Otley Preparative meeting until at least 1822. When Knaresborough Monthly Meeting was dissolved in 1853 Rawdon Preparative meeting was incorporated into Brighouse Monthly Meeting. Brighouse Monthly Meeting divided in 1923 and in 1924, Rawdon became part of Leeds Monthly Meeting along with Carlton Hill, Adel, Roundhay, Gildersome and Ilkley Meetings. The Quaker Meeting House at Rawdon was built in 1697, standing well back from the road and with a high wall in front of it. The ground was conveyed to the Trustees on 15th February 1697. Quakers from surrounding parishes were also allowed to meet there and bury their dead in the graveyard. A Meeting was settled in Brighouse c.1652. Groups of Quakers from the area were amongst those imprisoned in York Castle in 1661. It drew in Friends from Liversedge, Oakenshaw, Bradford, Bowling and Great Horton, as well as Brighouse. Meetings were held at the homes of members. In the 1680s decade later the Friends acquired their first Meeting House and burial ground, on Snake Hill, Rastrick. The site was known as Scar Mill Cliff and was rebuilt in 1737. Land at Newlands was bought in 1863 and six years later a large Meeting House with classrooms opened on the site. Since this was sold in 1958, the Meeting continued in rented accommodation until its closure in 1988. In the mid-1650s, several Friends were active in Knaresborough, and suffered imprisonment for preaching at the parish church. The Knaresborough Meeting was first recorded in 1665 as part of Skipton Monthly Meeting, and again in 1669, as the newly formed Knaresborough Monthly Meeting. In 1689 the home of Mary Middleton was licensed for religious worship and the first purpose-built Meeting House opened in 1701 in Gracious Street, Knaresborough. The Meeting declined during the 18th century, one of the reasons being the lack of resident ministers. In 1792 it merged with Netherdale Meeting (based at Dacre). This arrangement lasted until 1826 and the Quaker connection with Knaresborough ceased. Bradford Friends were part of Brighouse until the 1670s, when an independent Meeting in Bradford was established.. A burial ground was acquired in 1672 at Goodman's End and the first Meeting House opened on the same site in 1698. Over the following centuries local Quakers were involved in the wool trade, banking and insurance, large numbers of them were also apothecaries and doctors. In 1732 a new Meeting House was built on the same site; this was demolished and replaced by a new building in 1811. Despite successive improvements, the whole property was sold in 1876 and a new Meeting House opened in Fountain Street two years later. 11 Melbourne Place, was bought in 1951, following a decline in membership; the Meeting has been housed in Russell Street since 1995. The Meeting has historically been part of Brighouse Monthly Meeting.[Quakerism in the Nidderdale, Rawdon Friends, Brighouse Friends, Knaresborough Friends, Bradford Friends] Brighouse is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale, in West Yorkshire. It is situated on the River Calder. The name Brighouse (or "Bridge House") originates from a building on (or close to) the bridge over the River Calder. In its early history, it was a hamlet of the nearby village of Rastrick. There was a river crossing called Snake Hill Ford across the Calder – this is believed to have formed part of the Roman route between Wakefield and Manchester. A wooden structure called Rastrick Bridge was recorded as being present in 1275. The bridge was replaced by one built with timber 1514 and a stone bridge in 1558. The river provided power for the flour milling industry and the textile mills. Brighouse's industry received a boost through the construction of the Calder and Hebble Navigation, started in 1757.[Wikipedia] Rastrick is a village in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near Halifax. Remains of a hill fort have been found at Castle Hill. The name Rastrick is thought to be Viking in origin, with the "..ick" formation being common to many Norwegian Viking placenames, including "Jorvick", the Viking name for York.[Wikipedia]
   
   

1.2.2.1.1. William Bilton (s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 3/4/1658, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1735/1736 & buried 29/2/1735-1736, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Yeoman, 1735/1736.[586] Married Susanna.[586] Susanna died 1740 & buried 2/12/1740, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (widow).[586] Resided 1695, Clapham Green, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1740, Felliscliff, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]

Children of William Bilton & Susanna:
i.
 
Susanna Bilton, baptised 10/9/1693, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Married Abraham Dodgson, 20/5/1714, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Abraham of Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England & Susanna of Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
Children: (a)
 
John Bilton.[586] Died 1723 & buried 23/10/1723, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (s/o Susanna).[586]
(b)
Isaac Dodgon, baptised 18/1/1724, St Robert of Knaresborough, Pannal, Co Yorkshire, England.[594]
(c)Susanna Dodgson, baptised 12/4/1726, All Saints, Kirkby Overblow, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(d)Isaac Dodshen, baptised 8/4/1729, All Saints, Kirkby Overblow, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
ii.

William Bilton, baptised 3/2/1694-1695, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1749 & buried 7/9/1749, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
 William's will, dated 28/8/1749, leaves property to his wife and son, William, and other assets to his children William, Ann & Mary, all minors, naming his son, William, executor, and his brother, Richard as co-trustee of the estate, "William Bilton of Birstwith, Parish of Hampsthwaite, Yeoman. To my wife Ann Bilton my copyhold house, barn, oven house and land of 2 acres known as Peter Parker Farm, and at her death the same to my son William Bilton. Residue of my real estate to my son William. To my daughters Mary Bilton and Ann Bilton, 300 each when they reach 21. The interest meanwhile to be used for their maintenance and education. My wife to have tuition of my daughters and I appoint my brother Richard Bilton as supervisor and he is to be accountable to my son William once he reaches 21. To my son William my freehold estate of 30a 3r : 6a occupied by Henry Gill; 4a 2r occupied by Cuthbert Lumley; 3a occupied by Thomas Aveson. Remainder of my goods and chattels to my son William whom I appoint Executor. If he dies before reaching 21 then my copyhold property is to go according to the Customs of the Forest of Knaresborough and my personal estate to my two daughters. If all my three children die before reaching 21 then my real estate to go to my wife, and at her death the same to my brother Richard. To Mary Smith, Ann Smith, and Elizabeth Smith, daughters of Thomas Smith, 100 each. To William West, son of Francis West, bowel turner, 5. To William Chippindale, son of John Chippindale, Wright or carpenter, 5s. To William Bramley, son of William Bramley, yeoman, 5s. To William Holme, son of William Holme, husbandman, 5s. If my 3 daughters die before reaching 21 then I give an annuity of 2 each for the education of 8 girls in the Hamlet of Birstwith. I appoint my brother Richard and Thomas Smith, the vicar of Hampsthwaite, as Trustees. Witnesses Francis West, Jane Bramley, William Holmes, Thomas Smith, Richard Bilton."[599] 
Mentioned, along with Richard & Mary Bilton (identity unknown), in the will of Elizabeth Iles, dated 19/5/1728 & probated 4/6/1729, "Elizabeth Iles of the Parish of Hampsthwaite. To William Atkinson, 40. To Tom Simpson junior, 10. To William Bilton junior, Richard Bilton, and Mary Bilton, 5 each. To Ann Blackburn and Mary Blackburn, 5 each. To Francis Jeffrey, 10. To Isabel Jeffrey, 5. I appoint William Simpson senior, of Haverah Park, and Samuel West, to be my Executors and to pay my legacies one year after my decease. [Notes a proviso made in her husband’s, Samuel Iles, Will of 17th May 1728]. Witnesses Rebecca Bowcock, William Waite."[610]
Yeoman, 1736,1749.[586,599] Gentleman, 1738, 1741, 1749.[586] Married unknown. Married 2nd Ann Wade, 6/11/1735, St Robert of Knaresborough, Pannal, Co Yorkshire, England.[594] Ann born c.1711, died 1799 & buried 5/1799, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (88yo).[586]
 Ann's will, written 25/8/1778 & probated 4/10/1799, leaves property to her son, William, and goods & cash to her children Mary, William & Ann (unmarried), "Ann Bilton of Birstwith, Parish of Hampsthwaite, Widow. Item the ancient building with ten acres and one pennyworth of land in Beckwith with Rossett, now occupied by Christopher Lee, to my son, William Bilton, chargeable with 100 to my daughter Ann Bilton. Item an annuity of 4 to my daughter Mary Wilson. Also 10. If Mary leaves a child at her death, then that child to have 100 when she reaches 21. Item to my son William [named household items and some silver spoons marked WB]. Item the residue of my goods, chattels, and personal estate, to my daughter Ann, whom I appoint Executrix. Witnesses William Andrew, John Lumley, Thomas Lumley."[598] 
Resided 1722-1732, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Resided 1739, 1741, Clapham Green, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Resided 1749, 1778, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[598,599]
Children: (a)
 
William Bilton, baptised 8/8/1722, St Mary Castlegate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(b)
Francis Bilton, baptised 13/1/1724, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died young.
(c)David Bilton, baptised 25/5/1727, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Married unknown.
Children: (1)
 
Margaret Bilton, baptised 22/12/1757, St Crux, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(d)Francis Bilton, baptised 14/5/1729, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(e)George Bilton, baptised 19/5/1730, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Married Elizabeth Boddy, 29/7/1753, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
Children: (1)
 
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 4/5/1755, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(2)
Frances Bilton, baptised 17/6/1759, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(3)Susanna Bilton, baptised 2/8/1761, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(4)Ann Bilton, baptised 26/12/1762, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(5)William Bilton, baptised 14/11/1764, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Mentioned in the will of Ann Bilton nee Mace of York, dated 24/10/1787.[616]
(6)Francis Bilton, baptised 8/9/1768, All Saints Pavement & St Peter the Little, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Mentioned in the will of Ann Bilton nee Mace of York, dated 24/10/1787.[616]
(f)Charles Bilton, baptised 27/6/1732, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(g)James Bilton, baptised 27/6/1732, St Michael Spurriergate, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(h)Mary Bilton, baptised 10/9/1736, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1806 & buried 20/12/1806, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (70yo).[586] Mentioned in the will of her father, written 1749, Mary was a minor at the time.[599] Mentioned in the will of her mother, written 1778 & probated 1799, then married.[598] Married Joseph Wilson, 5/6/1771, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] By licence.[586] At the time of the marriage Joseph was curate of St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Later vicar of Hampsthwaite.[586,595] Joseph born c.1722, died 1810 & buried 9/11/1810, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (88yo).[586]
Children: (1)
 
Bilton Josephus Wilson, born 4/7/1788, baptised 4/7/1778, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1866.[595] Was an extensive landowner in the district, as well as a benefactor the parish of Hampsthwaite. "On the mother's side he was descended from the old and respectable family of Bilton, who have been landowners in the Forest of Knaresborough from a very early period. Was educated for the medical profession, but never practised, except amongst his poor neighbours, to whom (before a doctor settled in the village) he freely gave his advice and medicine. During the whole of his life he was remarkably benevolent and kind to the poor. He died somewhat suddenly, though slightly indisposed; he took tea as usual on the day of his death, when a fainting fit came on, from which he never recovered. When the school in Hampsthwaite was built he was the largest subscriber; and on the 25th of January, 1865, he transferred 1,500, new three per cent annuities, to four trustees, to form a perpetual endowment for the said school. By his will he bequeathed 100 to the Leeds Infirmary, 100 to the Harrogate Bath Hospital, 100 to the Church Missionary Society, 100 to the Society of Oddfellows at Hampsthwaite, and directed his executors to distribute his annual gift of 40 to the poor of the village, on the New Year's Day next after his decease."[595] Was the main benificiary in the will of his aunt, Ann Bilton, dated 1810, and executor of the same.[600] Married Sarah Simpson, 22/10/1836, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Sarah died 1869.[595] No issue.[595]
(i)William Bilton, baptised 19/11/1739, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Died 1806 & buried 8/6/1806, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (67yo).[586] Gentleman, 1799,1806.[586,601]
 William's will, written 12/6/1799 & probated 11/7/1806, leaves his property to his sister, Ann, with provisions for his nephew, Bilton Wilson, and sister Mary, "William Bilton of Birstwith, Gentleman. All my real estate to my sister Ann Bilton, and at her death the same to my nephew Bilton Josephus Wilson. Should my nephew die without issue then I charge my estate in Menwith with Darley, now occupied by Thomas Acres, with : 1 per month for the churchwarden and overseer of the poor at Birstwith for the purchase of bread to be distributed to the poor of Birstwith. 5 per year to the schoolmistress at Felliscliffe for teaching 5 poor girls from Birstwith to read, knit and sew. To my sister Mary Wilson and annuity of 50. To my nephew Bilton Josephus 500. should he die without issue then I give a further 20 per year to the poor at Birstwith. Witnesses : Robert Keighley, Matthew Winter, James Collins. Probate 11th July 1806. effects under 2,000. Inventory by David Goodall, Richard Snow, William Andrew, and John Bell."[601] 
Mentioned in the will of his father, written 1749, was a minor at the time, named as executor of the will.[599] Mentioned in the will of his mother, written 1778 & probated 1799.[598] Mentioned in the will of Ann Bilton nee Mace of York, dated 24/10/1787, also named as co-executor.[616] On 11/2/1804 was a witness to the will of William Day of Birstwith, Parish of Hampsthwaite.[602] Resided 1787,1799, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[601,616]
(j)Ann Bilton, baptised 16/8/1741, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586] Died 1819, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England, & buried 16/8/1819, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England (77yo).[586]
 Ann's will, written 12/11/1810 & probated 12/11/1819, leaves property to her nephew, Bilton Wilson, plus smaller inheritances to her servants, tenants and the poor, "Ann Bilton of Birstwith, Parish of Hampsthwaite, Spinster. My house near West Syke in the Township of Felliscliffe, now occupied by Joseph Bottomley to my nephew Bilton Josephus Wilson. Should my nephew die without issue then the same to Mary Prince of York, daughter of George Clarkson, late of Hampsthwaite, subject to 10 each to the poor of Birstwith and Felliscliffe. To my servant William Bolton my house and land in the Township of Felliscliffe, Parish of Hampsthwaite, now occupied by William Rhodes. To each of my servants 20. 6 to the poor of Birstwith and Felliscliffe. 1 1s each to five of my nearest neighbours that occupy five poor houses at the time of my death. If my servant William Bolton still lives with me at my death, and if I have any stock remaining, he is to have one horse, one cow, one cart, one long table, one oval table, one dresser, six chairs, one silver table spoon marked W.B., one oak bedstead and bed with the double blankets, long bolster and all things thereto belonging. To Charles Andrew 3 3s. To each of my tenants wives two yards of black silk and one yard of white ribband and one pair of gloves. To Hannah Rushforth the same. To each of my servants a suit of mourning. I wish to be buried at Hampsthwaite Church near my family tombstone at the side of the Church, and my tenants wives to be bearers. I wish that 4d dole shall be given at my funeral at the Church, and that wine and biscuits shall be given at my house, and dinner at either of the public houses at Hampsthwaite. I wish that my executors pay 15 for a tombstone. The residue of my estate to go to my nephew Bilton, whom I appoint executor. Witnesses John Lumley, William Andrew, John Moorhouse."[600] 
Mentioned in the will of her father, written 1749, Mary was a minor at the time.[599] Mentioned in the will of her mother, written 1778 & probated 1799, named executor of the same.[598] On 11/2/1804 was a witness to the will of William Day of Birstwith, Parish of Hampsthwaite.[602] Resided 1810,1819, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,600]
iii.

Richard Bilton, baptised 13/11/1698, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589] Died 1769 & buried 27/8/1768, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586]
 On 20/6/1770 admon Bond of 40 was granted for the estate of Richard Bilton, gentleman, of Birstwith, mentions William Bilton of Birstwith, Gentleman, nephew of Richard, and Christopher Graham of Birstwith, Yeoman, effects under 20.[612] 
Mentioned, along with William & Mary Bilton (identity unknown), in the will of Elizabeth Iles, dated 19/5/1728 & probated 4/6/1729, "Elizabeth Iles of the Parish of Hampsthwaite. To William Atkinson, 40. To Tom Simpson junior, 10. To William Bilton junior, Richard Bilton, and Mary Bilton, 5 each. To Ann Blackburn and Mary Blackburn, 5 each. To Francis Jeffrey, 10. To Isabel Jeffrey, 5. I appoint William Simpson senior, of Haverah Park, and Samuel West, to be my Executors and to pay my legacies one year after my decease. [Notes a proviso made in her husband’s, Samuel Iles, Will of 17th May 1728]. Witnesses Rebecca Bowcock, William Waite."[610]
In 1749 was a witness to his brother's will (William) & named a trustee of the same and guardian of William's children, who were still minors.[599] Gentleman, 1770.[612] Unmarried.[612] Resided 1769, Birstwith, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,612]
iv.

Francis Bilton, born 1700,[592] baptised 21/4/1700, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]
 On 9/1/1732 mentioned in the will of Dorothy Cooke, "Dorothy Cooke of Felliscliffe, Parish of Hampsthwaite. I have surrendered my copyhold property to my Trustees, Thomas Harrison and William Jeffrey. After the death of my husband, Jonathan Cooke, I give to Francis Bilton, senior, the six closes of land called Well Close, Laith Close, Peeler Close, Little Close, and two others, with the ancient building, two barns, an oven house, stable, turf house, now occupied by my husband, chargeable with : 20 to the assigness of my husband. 20 to Dorothy Wilson. 1 each to Robert Harrison, Chretto Harrison, Marie Harrison, Susannah Harrison, and Ann Pil__. 2 to Thomas Harrison. 2 to Thomas To__. After the death of myself and my husband : To Catherine Chippindale, an ancient building, barn and stable, three closes called Low Close, Middle Close, and Little Close, now occupied by Luke Kendall, and at her death the same to her daughter Dorothy Chippindale. Should Dorothy due before her mother then the same to her brothers and sisters. This is chargeable with an annuity of 10s to Susannah Dodgson and a sum of 10. 1 to Susannah Bilton. 1 to Luke Kendall. 1 to Ellen Fleetham. 1 to Marie Stead. 2 to Marie Broadley. Witnesses William Harrison, Thomas Simpson, Hannah Fleetham, Jonathan Cooke."[615] 
Married Anne Mace, 7/11/1741, Holy Trinity, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Ann born 1711.[592]
 Ann's will, written 24/10/1787 & probated 15/6/1791, "Ann Bilton of York, Widow. To my niece Ann Fentiman, wife of William Fentiman of York, Bricklayer, my real estate in Felliscliffe now occupied by John Darnbrough. At her death, the same to her children. To my niece Mary Prince, wife of William Prince of York, Silk Weaver, my real estate in Felliscliffe now occupied by Francis Robinson, chargeable with 100 to my niece Ann, and 100 to my niece Margaret Horner, wife of Joseph Horner of York, Butter Factor. To my niece Ann Jowett, wife of Benjamin Jowett, of Camberwell, Surrey, Furrier, 800. To William Bilton and Francis Bilton, sons of George Bilton, late of York, 100 each. To my niece Elizabeth Riley, wife of John Riley of Leeds, Upholsterer, 100. To my niece Frances Riley, wife of ? Riley, of Aldwark, 100. To William Bilton of Birstwith, and Henry Jowett of York, 10 10s each. To William Bilton of York, and Ann Harrison, wife of Robert Harrison of York, each a mourning ring. The residue of my estates to Ann Fentiman, Mary Prince, and Ann Jowett. I appoint William Bilton of Birstwith, and Henry Jowett as executors. Witnesses Samuel Smithson, James Collins, Edward Richardson."[616] 
Children: (a)
 
Francis Bilton, baptised 10/9/1743, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1746 & buried 3/5/1746, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(b)
Anne Bilton, baptised 18/7/1745, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Died 1746 & buried 15/4/1746, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(c)Anne Bilton, baptised 10/10/1746, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Mentioned in the will of her mother, Ann Bilton nee Mace of York, dated 24/10/1787.[616] Married Robert Harrison, 11/7/1750, Holy Trinity Kings Court, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Robert born 1750.[592]
(d)Francis Stephen Bilton, baptised 27/12/1747, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
(e)William Bilton, baptised 10/9/1749, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592] Mentioned in the will of his mother, Ann Bilton nee Mace of York, dated 24/10/1787.[616]
(f)John Bilton, baptised 26/9/1750, Christ Church, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[592]
v.

John Bilton, baptised 16/12/1705, St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite, Co Yorkshire, England.[586,589]

   
St. Thomas  Becket, Hampsthwaite
St. Thomas Becket, Hampsthwaite
Painting - unknown artist, 1700s
All Saints, Kirkby Overblow
All Saints, Kirkby Overblow
Photograph - Alexander P Kapp [Geograph]
Newgate Market, York
Newgate Market, York
Photograph - Google StreetView
Kirkby Overblow is a village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire. There are two pubs in Kirkby Overblow. The Shoulder of Mutton and the Star and Garter. The villageis located on a high south-facing ridge overlooking Wharfedale surrounded by farmland. The first written reference to Kirkby Overblow appears in the Domesday Book, where it appears as Cherchebi, 'the village with the church'. The 'Overblow' element of it present name is first recorded in 1211 as Oreblowere, and is thought to relate to iron smelting. The historic core of Kirkby Overblow is the group of listed buildings comprising All Saints Church, the Old Rectory and Rectory Cottages. The village has developed in a T-shaped form from the intersection of Main Street and Barrowby Lane. The parish church occupies the highest point and is dedicated to All Saints, standing 365 feet above sea level. The church is predominantly late eighteenth century (1780-81) but the north transept is fourteenth century and the north wall of the building incorporates a Saxon doorway, now blocked and two early fourteenth century windows with plate tracery. The Church was restored in 1872. It is constructed of coursed gritstone with some ashlar and a stone slate roof. The Church has a nave, south aisle of 3 bays with a central porch, north transept and a 2-bay chancel with diagonal buttresses.[Wikipedia, Kirkby Overblow, All SaintsYork is a walled city, situated at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England. The city has a rich heritage and has provided the backdrop to major political events throughout much of its two millennia of existence. The city was founded by the Romans in 71 AD, under the name of Eboracum. It became in turn the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior, and of the kingdoms of Northumbria and Jorvik. In the Middle Ages, York grew as a major wool trading centre and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained. In the 19th century York became a hub of the railway network and a manufacturing centre. The word 'York' comes from the Latin name for the city, variously rendered as Eboracum, Eburacum or Eburaci. The first mention of York by this name is dated to c.95–104 AD. It is thought that Eboracum is derived from the Brythonic word Eborakon meaning either "place of the yew trees" or perhaps "field of Eboras". The name 'Eboracum' was turned into 'Eoforwic' by the Anglians in the 7th century. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as 'Jrvk'. Jrvk was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century. Following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and the removal of the garrison from York in 1688, the city was dominated by the local gentry and merchants, although the clergy were still important. Competition from the nearby cities of Leeds and Hull, together with silting of the River Ouse, resulted in York losing its pre-eminent position as a trading centre. Nevertheless, the city's role as the social and cultural centre for wealthy northerners was on the rise. York's many elegant townhouses, such as the Lord Mayor's Mansion House and Fairfax House (now owned by York Civic Trust) date from this period, as do the Assembly Rooms, the Theatre Royal, and the Racecourse.[Wikipedia]
   
St Mary Castlegate, York
St Mary Castlegate, York
Photograph - Google StreetView
St Michael's, Spurriergate, York
St Michael's, Spurriergate, York
Photograph - Bill Henderson [Geograph]
Hampsthwaite Vicarage
Hampsthwaite Vicarage
Image - undated postcard
St. Mary's, Castlegate, possesses an extremely interesting stone of the eleventh century, recording that, "This Minster was set up by Eferaud and Grim and ?se in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and St. Mary and St. Martin and St. Cuthbert and All Saints and was consecrated in the year -". The present building dates from the 15th century. The church was restored by the Dean of York in 1870, but deconsecrated in 1958. In 1972 it was acquired by the York Civic Trust. At 47 metres, the it has the highest church steeple in York. It is now a modern art centre.[York Guides, Wikimedia, Britannia Travels] St Michael's Spurriergate, York now houses the Spurriergate Centre, opened in 1989. The original church dates back to the Norman conquest. The slim pillars holding up the roof are nine centuries old and the oldest part of the church. The church took its name from the spur-making tradesmen who occupied this street in the 15th century. The original tower has been lowered, and in 1821 the east wall of the church was rebuilt in order to widen the street. The building has also seen a number of structural changes including the foreshortening of the building when the East wall was rebuilt in 1821. This work was done to widen the street and resulted in the half arch that can be seen near the main entrance to the Centre. The tower was lowered in the 1960's and the Centre still houses a full set of bells which are rung frequently.[Medieval Churches of York, Spurriergate CentreThe Old Parsonage, Hampsthwaite. Until its disposal by the church authorities in the 1970s (when a new Vicarage was built in its grounds) this was the residence of the Vicars of Hampsthwaite. It is one of the most imposing domestic building in the village. Grainge in his history of "Harrogate and the forest of Knaresborough" (1871) merely says that it is "a large, plain, comfortable looking building, situate in its own grounds". It is a three-storey building. The doorway is one of the few in the village that is emphasised with strong quoin detailing. The building is mid/late eighteenth century with early/mid nineteenth century remodelling and extension and was restored c1980. It is of coursed, squared, gritstone and has a grey stone slate roof. The ground floor right window replaced a bow window removed with the rendering during restorations c1980.[Hampsthwaite Village]
   
Birstwith village
Birstwith village
Image - undated postcard
Christ Church, York
Christ Church, York
Photograph - Evening Press, 1930s
West Syke Farm
West Syke Farm
Photograph - Google StreetView
Christ Church, York (also known as Holy Trinity), located in King's Square, York. Traditionally on the site of an Anglo Scandinavian palace, it is possible this was the site of a royal chapel. The first firm reference to the church is 1268. Mostly a 14-15th century structure the church had a 60ft spire. In 1829 part of the church, including the spire was removed to accommodate the widening of Colliergate. The whole was demolished in 1861 and rebuilt. The new church had a short life span. In 1886 the parish was combined with St Sampson & Christ Church was closed. The church fell into disuse and by 1896 it housed a small flock of sheep, totally appropriate for the church of the Butchers Guild. It was finally demolished in 1937, but some of the gravestones from its churchyard can be seen in King's Square near the top of the Shambles, and at the Petergate end of the Square is a large inscribed paving stone commemorating the church.[Wikipedia, York's Churches]
   
    

1.2.2.1.2. Robert Bilton (s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 1672, All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest, Co Yorkshire, England.[593] Married unknown.

Children of Robert Bilton:
i.
 
Ann Bilton,[215] probably born between 1690-1700 (from DOM & birth of father). Married Thomas Newstead, 24/1/1720, All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
ii.

Thomas Bilton,[215] born between 1690-1705 (from DOB of issue & birth of father). Married unknown. Possibly the Thomas Bilton was was executed 4/9/1742, York Castle, Co Yorkshire, England, for horse stealing.[231]
Children: (a)
 
Anne Bilton, baptised 3/1/1726, Alne, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
iii.

Matthew Bilton,[219,222,227] probably born between 1700-1710.[202,203] {From DOBs of children} Died 9/11/1791, North America.[206] {Whilst no location is given, the death is listed in the North American IGI, consistent with his transportation there in 1758, see below} Labourer,[219] 1757.[229,230]
  According to a deposition of the Hon and Rev. Henry Egerton, Rector of Setterington, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, dated 16-19/12/1757, a "Riot lead by Matthew Bilton of Kilburn, labourer, within the North Riding had demanded 7 guns (one for each Township) from him at the head of a mob of 100 people firing guns and crying "No Militia", which he refused to pay except to the Constables." witnesses were T. Norcliffe, J. Sterne & B. Legard.[229] John Henshaw, servant to Lady Betty Egerton, was to give evidence.[229] According to another account, "Matthew Bilton, William Watson, Richard Ford, Robert Cole and George Berry. Monday, May 1st, A.D. 1758. - The above rioters were executed at the Tyburn without Micklegate Bar, pursuant to their sentence. Bilton, Watson, and Ford were convicted of high treason, and were not only hanged, but drawn and quartered. In their rioting wantonness they proceeded from market-town to market-town demanding money from the inhabitants, and using violent threats, by which they obtained seven guineas from the servants of Mr. Osbaldeston; also money from the Hon. and Rev. Henry Egerton. They died remarkably penitent, confessed to their being concerned in the said riots, and exhorted their countrymen to take warning from their untimely fate. Cole, in addition to the crime of rioting, was convicted for obstructing the execution of the Militia Act, They were called the "Wensleydale rioters," and originated in consequence of the high price of corn."[230] Whilst the above account implies Matthew was executed for his crimes, according to the York Castle Prison records, Matthew Bilton was convicted of "high treason for levying war against the king: riotous and armed (Militia Act)" on 13/3/1758 but received a reprieve 8/7/1758 with his sentence commuted to transportation.[231]  
Married Ann Weatherall,[202,222,227] 12/7/1730, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Ann baptised 25/9/1705, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[215] died 1791 & buried 11/11/1791, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,221] Resided 1744, Low Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Resided 1791, Old Stead, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
Children: (a)
 
Ann Bilton, baptised 2/4/1731, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Died infancy.
(b)
Mary Billton, baptised 31/7/1732, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Married Edward Wells, 28/9/1755, Coxwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
(c) Ann Bilton, baptised 13/8/1733, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
(d) Margaret Bilton, baptised 2/12/1734, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203,227] Died 1818 & buried 22/11/1818, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (84yo).[219,227] Married John Bourn/Burn, 25/3/1754-1755, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[202,219,227] John died 1809 & buried 12/3/1809, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Witnesses were John Britton & George Champla, with the consent of the parents.[219] Resided 1757,1759,1762,1764,1766,1768,1772,1773,1778,1809, Common End, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
Children: (1)
 
Elizabeth Burn, baptised 1/5/1755, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227]
(2)
Benjamin Bourn, baptised 24/2/1756-1757, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Died 1778 & buried 28/7/1778, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227]
(3) Mary Bourn, baptised 25/9/1759, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227]
(4) Jane Bourn, baptised 14/2/1761-1762, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Died 1764 & buried 18/11/1764, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227]
(5) Margaret Burn, baptised 3/5/1764, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Married William Ellis, 9/10/1787, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227]
(6) Ann Bourn, baptised 12/7/1766, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Married William Ellis, 6/9/1792, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227]
(7) Hannah Bourn, baptised 9/10/1768, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Married Thomas Claxton, 25/11/1815.[227]
(8) John Burn, baptised 13/7/1771, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227] Died 1846 & buried 15/10/1846, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227] Married Mary Ibbotson, 23/5/1793, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227]
(9) Matthew Burn, baptised 26/11/1772, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Died 1773 & buried 17/12/1773, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227]
(10) Matthew Burn, baptised 11/7/1777, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227] Married Sarah Clark, 23/11/1802.[227]
(11) Benjamin Burn, baptised 28/7/1788, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[227]
(e) Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 7/4/1736, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Died 1801 & buried 18/11/1801, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Married John Nickson/Nixon, 17/2/1756-1757, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Witnesses Matthew Bilton, Joseph Wood, with consent of the parents.[219] John a labourer.[219] John died 1790 & buried 21/6/1790, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Resided 1790,1801, Old Stead, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(f) Dorothy Bilton, baptised 26/5/1739, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
(g) Jane Bilton, baptised 26/5/1739, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Married John Elwick, 8/8/1763, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[202,219] Witnesses William Atkinson, Christopher Smaels.[219] John was of Bagby, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(h) Hannah Bilton, baptised 12/10/1744, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[202,219,227] Married Thomas Buck, 5/8/1775, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219,227] Witnesses were William Atkinson & William Sutton.[219] Labourer, 1778.[219] Farmer, 1778.[219] Labourer, 1779.[219] Resided 1775, Low Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Resided 1777, Old Stead, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Resided 1778, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Resided 1779,1788, Old Stead, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
Children: (1)
 
Thomas Buck, baptised 30/6/1775, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(2)
Ann Buck, baptised 28/6/1777, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Died 1778 & buried 29/4/1778, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(3) William Buck.[219] Died 1779 & buried 3/4/1779, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(4) Matthew Buck, baptised 8/8/1778, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
(5) John Buck, baptised 16/3/1779-1780, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219] Died 1788 & buried 24/6/1788, St Mary, Kilburn, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[219]
* iv.

Robert Bilton,[203] baptised 1707, All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest, Co Yorkshire, England.[593]

   
All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest
All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest
Photograph - Pauline Eccles [Geograph]
Cottage, Main Street, Sutton on the Forest
Cottage, Main Street, Sutton on the Forest
Photograph - Google StreetView
Rose & Crown Inn, Sutton on the Forest
Rose & Crown Inn, Sutton on the Forest
Photograph - Google StreetView
Sutton-on-the-Forest is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, 16 km north of York and 8 km southeast of Easingwold. The parish shares its southern boundary with the City of York. Known as Sudtone in the 11th century, Sutton sub Galtris in the 13th century and Sutton in Galtres in the 14th-16th centuries. The parish had a population of 489 in 1901, rising to 750 in 2005. The parish of Sutton-on-the-Forest covers about 6,000 acres of that stretch of level moorland to the north of York which is still known as the Forest of Galtres. This tract of land is, as Camden says, 'in some places thick and shady, with spreading trees, but in others is flat, wet, and boggy.' (fn. 1) The greater part of Sutton parish falls under the second description, though it is well wooded in the eastern half. The soil is alluvial and covered with old marlpits, and no point in the parish exceeds a level of 100 ft. above the ordnance datum. The stretches of flat ground which keep their old names of Brown Moor, West Moor, and the like have now for the most part been brought under cultivation, and 3,400 acres of the whole are arable land. (fn. 2) Grain crops are largely raised, as well as turnips and potatoes. The old common fields of the manor surrounding the village still retain their ancient names, and a road running north to Stillington and separating the north field from the middle field is still known as Wandell Balk. Opposite the church and south of the road stands Sutton Hall. It stands in a considerable park and is an 18th-century building of red brick with an entrance of the Doric order. The hall was for two centuries the home of the family of Harland, whose monuments are in the church. It probably occupies the site of the earlier Sutton Hall built by Humphrey Barwick in the reign of Elizabeth I. At the west end of the village is the cemetery, the site of which was provided by the Hon. A. Duncombe when the churchyard was closed in 1866. St John's Well stands by the roadside about a mile and a half to the east of the village. It is a plain square conduit head of stone of small size and fed by a spring. One of the most interesting buildings in the parish is New Park, the hunting lodge of James I. Sutton-on-the-Forest today consists of mainly 18th-century cottages. As recently as the 1970s Sutton-on-the Forest still had a farm with dairy herd remaining on the north side of Main Street and, at various times, cows and sheep continued to be run up Carr Lane and down from the Stillington Road along Main Street. In the period since, the village has to an extent turned into a commuter suburb of York and has lost its blacksmith, butcher, hairdresser, post office, village shop and the remaining garage. The parish church, All Hallows, serves both Sutton and Huby, and maintains strong links with the Methodist chapel in Huby. The picturesque medieval church, partially rebuilt in the 19th century, contains a fine series of monuments associated with the owners of Sutton Park. All Hallows is an active church with a substantial number on its electoral roll. It is now part of a benefice including the parishes of Stillington, Sheriff Hutton, Marton and Farlington, with the vicarage in Sutton. The church building has a history reaching back to Norman times, perhaps even earlier. The church consists of a chancel with a north chapel, nave with north aisle, west tower and south porch. The church was very largely rebuilt in 1877, only the tower and the south nave wall remaining of the old building. The rebuilding is regrettable, as the ancient structure was unique in this part of the country. It consisted of a nave and chancel with a north aisle of eight bays extending from the west face of the tower to the extreme east end of the chancel, the latter occupying three bays. It was at first, with the exception of the chancel, in which were traces of 14th-century work, entirely constructed of timber, with a row of posts to the aisle supporting a low pitched tie-beam roof, dating from the early part of the 15th century. Later on in the same century the outer walls were rebuilt in stone. At the same time a western tower was built and a timber south porch was also added. In 1877 the whole of the timber structure was removed and the chancel rebuilt.[Wikipedia, Sutton on the Forest, History of the County of York North Riding] "Sutton-on-the-Forest (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York; containing, with Huby township, 1123 inhabitants, of whom 567 are in the township of Sutton, 8 miles (N. by W.) from York. This parish, which forms part of the ancient forest of Galtres, is skirted by the river Foss, and comprises by computation about 10,000 acres; the soil is generally sandy, with a gravel and a clay substratum. The surface is slightly elevated, and distinct views are obtained of York and its noble cathedral from Sutton Hall, the residence of William Charles Harland, Esq., who has directed trees to be cut away for some distance, as they obstructed the prospect. The village is on the road from York to Helmsley. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at 17. 3. 4.; net income, 390, with an excellent house; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. It was endowed with a portion of the great tithes of Huby by Walter de Grey, archbishop in 1227. The church is a very handsome structure, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and parochial schools at Sutton and Huby are supported by subscription. At St. John's well is a strong chalybeate water. The celebrated Laurence Sterne was vicar of the parish."[Topographical Dictionary of England 1848] "Sutton-on-the-Forest, a township and a parish in Easingwold district, N. R. Yorkshire. The township lies 4 miles E of Tollerton railway station, and 8 N by W of York; and has a post-office under York. Acres, 5,800. Real property, 5,596. Pop., 652. Houses, 132. The parish contains also Huby township, and comprises 10,315 acres. Pop., 1,224. Houses, 244. The property is divided among a few. S. Hall is a chief residence. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of York. Value, 390. Patron, the Archbishop. The church was recently in disrepair. Charities, 26. Sterne was rector."[1872 Imperial Gazetteer]
   
St. Mary's Church, Kilburn
St. Mary's Church, Kilburn
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Village street, Oldstead
Village street, Oldstead
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Cottages, Kilburn
Cottages, Kilburn
Image Colin Grice [Geograph]
Kilburn is a parish the North Riding, Co Yorkshire, 7 miles south-east of the town of Thirsk. The village is divided into High Kilburn and Low Kilburn & in 2001 had a population of 500. The parish, which is extensive, comprises the townships of Kilburn, Oldstead, Thorpe-le-Willows, and Wass, with the hamlet of Hood-Grange. Hood Grange, now a farmhouse, was originally a Cistercian priory, founded as a cell to the abbey of Newburgh by Robert de Mowbray in 1138. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a plain ancient structure of Norman origin, with a tower. Rebuilt in the late 1800s.[GenUKI]
   
   

1.1.1.1.1.1. Miles Bilton (s/o John Bilton, s/o Edward Bilton, s/o Miles Bilton, s/o Richard Bilton),[596] baptised 6/11/1670, All Saints, Ripley, Co Yorkshire, England.[587] Married unknown.

Children of Miles Bilton:
i.
 
John Bilton, baptised 4/3/1696, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] On 7/1/1740 was named executor of the will of his son, Charles, and trustee of Charles' daughter, Mary.[603] Married unknown.
Children: (a)
 
John Bilton, baptised 17/10/1713, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
 Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To my brother William Metcalfe, 60 when he reaches 21 or gets married. He is to receive the interest in the meantime. Also 5 to buy mourning clothes. To Ann Rushforth, daughter of William Rushforth, 5. To John Bilton, Charles Bilton, George Bilton, and William Bilton, sons of John Bilton of Knaresborough, 2 10s each. To Mary Bilton and Elizabeth Bilton, 5 each when they reach 21. To Elizabeth Hinel, Jane Hinel, and Mary Hinel, daughters of Jane Hinel, 10 each when the reach 21. To Matthew Procter of Leeds, and his three children, 2 10 each. To Sarah Simpson, daughter of my brother William Simpson, 40 when she reaches 21 or gets married. To John Simpson, son of my brother William, 40 when he reaches 21. To Thomas Simpson, son of my brother William, 20 when he reaches 21. Residue of my goods, chattels and personal estate to my brother William, whom I appoint Executor. Witnesses Frances Sharpe, Sarah Wade, William Coates junior."[613] 
Married Elizabeth.[596]
Children: (1)
 
Jane Bilton, baptised 13/8/1742, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(2)
John Bilton, baptised 10/7/1748, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] On 10/11/1790 admon granted for the estate of John Bilton of Knaresborough, Currier, mentions Samuel Jackson of Allerton Mauleverer, Merchant. George Jackson of Burton Leonard, Tanner. George Jackson of Allerton Mauleverer, Common Brewer. Effects under 220.{614]
(b)
Charles Bilton, baptised 28/1/1715, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1740/1741.[603]
 Charles' will, written 7/1/1740 & probated 18/6/1741, leaves his estate to his father, with provision for his wife & daughter, naming his father the executor, "Charles Bilton of Knaresborough. My Copyhold house in Knaresborough to my father, John Bilton, to be sold and the money to be used to settle my debts. My wife to have sufficient furniture for a room. I appoint my father as Executor in Trust for my daughter Mary Bilton, to whom I give the residue of my estates. Witnesses Mary Bilton, Thomas Frankland."[603]
Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To John Bilton, Charles Bilton, George Bilton, and William Bilton, sons of John Bilton of Knaresborough, 2 10s each."[613]
 
Married Elizabeth Bentley, 12/2/1738, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Elizabeth married 2nd John Wright, 31/1/1754, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Resided 1740, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[603]
Children: (1)
 
Mary Bilton, baptised 20/6/1740, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Married John Ray, 11/8/1766, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(c)George Bilton, baptised 1718, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1790, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[604] Currier.[604]
 Dated 10/11/1790, Admon Bond for George Bilton of Knaresborough, Currier, "Samuel Jackson of Allerton Mauleverer, Merchant. George Jackson of Burton Leonard, Tanner. George Jackson of Allerton Mauleverer, Common Brewer. Effects under 170."[604]
Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To John Bilton, Charles Bilton, George Bilton, and William Bilton, sons of John Bilton of Knaresborough, 2 10s each."[613]
In 1756 was witness to the will of John Andrews, yeoman, of Knaresborough.[605]
 
Married Mary Barber, 21/3/1741, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
Children: (1)
 
George Bilton, baptised 27/11/1743, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(2)
John Bilton, baptised 25/1/1744, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died young.
(3)John Bilton, baptised 29/11/1746, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Currier.[607] Will dated 2/1/1783, "John Bilton of Knaresborough, Currier. All my real estate to my sister Jane Bilton, chargeable with an annuity of 8 to my uncle Thomas Bilton. My personal estate to my sister Jane whom I appoint executrix. Witnesses John Gibson, Thomas Jackson, James Collins Junr."[608]
(4)Jane Bilton, baptised 6/1/1748, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Executor of her brother's will, John Bilton, 1783.[608]
(5)Hannah Bilton, baptised 26/12/1752, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(6)Laetitia Bilton, baptised 13/2/1754, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(d)William Bilton.[613] Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To John Bilton, Charles Bilton, George Bilton, and William Bilton, sons of John Bilton of Knaresborough, 2 10s each."[613]
(e)Thomas Bilton, baptised 13/11/1725, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Married Ruth.[596]
Children: (1)
 
Sarah Bilton, baptised 9/10/1763, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(2)
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 13/8/1769, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1769 & buried 18/8/1769, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(3)Ruth Bilton, baptised 26/8/1770, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1771 & buried 9/6/1771, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(4)Fanny Bilton, baptised 21/1/1776, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Died 1776 & buried 4/9/1776, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
(f)Sarah Bilton, baptised 1727, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Married John Andrews.[605] Will dated 11/12/1756, "John Andrews of Knaresborough, Yeoman. 10s each to my children, Francis Andrews, Mary Andrews, Isabella Andrews, Jane Andrews, and Frances Andrews. The residue of my goods, chattels, and personal estate, to my wife Sarah Andrews, whom I appoint Executrix. Witnesses George Bilton."[605]
Children: (1)
 
Francis Andrews.[605]
(2)
Mary Andrews.[605]
(3)Isabella Andrews.[605]
(4)Jane Andrews.[605]
(5)Frances Andrews.[605]
(g)Isabella Bilton, baptised 19/9/1735, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
ii.

Ann Bilton, baptised 22/9/1699, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
iii.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 11/7/1702, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To Mary Bilton and Elizabeth Bilton, 5 each when they reach 21."[613]
iv.

Sarah Bilton, baptised 9/9/1707, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]
v.

Mary Bilton, baptised 19/5/1709, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596] Mentioned in will of Sarah Simpson, spinster of Catton, Co Yorkshire, England, dated 31/5/1725, "To Mary Bilton and Elizabeth Bilton, 5 each when they reach 21."[613]
vi.
Hannah Bilton, baptised 20/11/1711, St John, Knaresborough, Co Yorkshire, England.[596]

     
St John's, Knaresborough
St John's, Knaresborough
Photograph - "beamcottage" [Geograph]
Knaresborough, 1813
Knaresborough, 1813
Engraving - J. P. Neale
Church Lane, Knaresborough
Church Lane, Knaresborough
Photograph - David Ward [Geograph]
Knaresborough is an old and historic market town, spa town and civil parish in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England, located on the River Nidd.The origin of the name of Knaresborough is not altogether clear, although one of two sources seems most probable. "Knare" may come either from the name of a chieftain, such that the whole means something like "Cenheard's fortress"; or it may derive from "knar" - a rocky outcrop - thus giving Knaresborough the appellation of "the fortress on the rock". Knaresborough is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Chednaresburg or Chenaresburg. Knaresborough Castle dates from Norman times; c.1100, the town began to grow and provide a market and attract traders to service the castle. The present parish church, St John's, was established around this time. Hugh de Morville was granted Knaresborough in 1158. He was constable of Knaresborough and leader of the group of four knights who murdered Archbishop Thomas Beckett at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. The four knights fled to Knaresborough and hid at the castle. Hugh de Morville forfeited the lands in 1173, not for his implication in the murder of Thomas Becket, but for "complicity in the rebellion of young Henry". Although a market was first mentioned in 1206, the town was not granted a Royal Charter to hold a market until 1310, by Edward II. A market is still held every Wednesday in the market square. During Edward II's reign, the castle was occupied by rebels and the curtain walls were breached by a siege engine. Later, Scots invaders burned much of the town and the parish church. During the Civil War, following the Battle of Marston Moor in 1644, the castle was besieged by Parliamentary forces. The castle eventually fell and in 1646 an order was made by Parliament for its destruction (but not carried out till 1648). The destruction was mainly done by citizens looting the stone. Many town centre buildings are built of 'castle stone'. It was in the latter half of the sixteenth century that Knaresborough's reputation as a spa town began with its recommendation as a base for taking the newly discovered waters of Tewit Well. The textile industry has been associated with Knaresborough for centuries - records of 1211 mention mills. Industrial development was hampered by the lack of an efficient transport system. A canal system was proposed around 1818 but deemed to be too expensive due to the large number of locks which would be required. A railway system was costed and proposed in 1820 but did not gain sufficient support and the situation was left unresolved until the middle of the century. Now the fabric of the town began to receive necessary attention, to relieve the squalor of the streets and improve the living conditions of many of the town's inhabitants. Chapels and schools were built throughout the century and the Improvement Commissioners were charged with the "paving, lighting, watching and improving of Knaresborough". The first half of the century saw the beginnings of street gas lighting (1824) and sewerage installations(1850). The impressive railway viaduct was completed in 1851, finally ushering in the railway age to Knaresborough - three years after the first viaduct had collapsed into the river as it neared completion. The viaduct was vital in establishing efficient communications with the town.[WikipediaKnaresborough] "Knaresborough, market town, par., and township, E. div. West-Riding Yorkshire, on summit of a hill on river Nidd, 17 miles NW. of York, 18 miles N. of Leeds, and 208 miles from London by rail--par. (containing the greater part of Harrogate), 12,490 ac., pop. 16,088; township, 3013 ac., pop. 5065; town (Knaresborough and Tentergate), 481 ac., pop. 5000; P.O., T.O., 3 Banks. Market-day, Wednesday. Linen mfr. forms the chief trade of Knaresborough; amongst its products are sheetings, towellings, diapers, &c. There is also a great trade in corn. The town was anciently surrounded bya deep moat or a dyke. Knaresborough returned 1 member to Parliament until 1885."[Bartholomew's 1887]
     
     


1.2.2.1.2.1. Robert Bilton (s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[203,222,228] baptised 1707, All Hallows, Sutton on the Forest, Co Yorkshire, England.[593] Married Frances Gibson.[222]

Children of Robert Bilton & Frances Gibson:

i.
 
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 28/1/1733, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
*
ii.

Robert Billton,[222] baptised 30/10/1734, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]

iii.

Mary Bilton, baptised 31/1/1737, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
*
iv.

Matthew Bilton,[222] baptised 19/8/1739, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]

v.

Joseph Bilton,[205] probably born between 1735-1745. {Possible son. Robert's son, Matthew, was the only other Bilton in Topcliffe} Married Mary Proctor, 14/2/1764, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205]
vi.
Sarah Bilton,[222] baptised 13/11/1742, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]

vii.
Frances Bilton,[222] baptised 3/6/1745, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203,228] Died 1824 & buried 4/4/1824, Stamford Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England (80yo).[228] Married John Custobody, 2/2/1767, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203,228] John, s/o George & Abigail, baptised 23/4/1738, Catton, Co Yorkshire, died 1814 & buried 9/11/1814, Stamford Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England (78yo).[228]
Children: (a)
 
Jane Bilton, baptised 5/2/1763, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203,228]
(b)
William Costebadie, baptised 3/5/1767, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(c) John Costabadie, baptised 26/11/1770, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(d) Mary Costebadie, baptised 23/4/1774, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228] Married John Cotham, 2/11/1795, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(e) Jane Custobody, born 9/9/1778, baptised 7/12/1778, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228] Married Guy Hawkins, 3/6/1800, Bishop Wilton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(f) Frances Costebadie, baptised 27/12/1780, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(g) George Costebadie, born 25/5/1783, baptised 6/7/1783, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[228] Married Elizabeth Barker, 2/7/1803, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228] Married 2nd Elizabeth Webster, 12/11/1812, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228] Married 3rd Ann Hood, 10/5/1819, Gate Helmsley, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(h) James Costebadie, baptised 9/5/1785, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(i) Thomas Costebadie, baptised 25/3/1788, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(j) Easter Costebadie, baptised 25/3/1788, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(k) Robert Costebadie, baptised 9/5/1789, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(l) Richard Costebadie, baptised 9/5/1789, Catton, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]
(m) Elizabeth Costebadie, born 1792, Stamford Bridge, Co Yorkshire, England.[228]

viii.
Thomas Bilton,[222] baptised 12/6/1748, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
ix. Richard Bilton,[215] baptised 19/11/1750, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Died 1825 & buried 29/8/1825, St Andrew, Rillington, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (77yo).[221] Married Mary.[221] Mary born 1750, died 1814 & buried 5/6/1814, St Mary the Virgin, Old Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (64yo).[221]
Children: (a)
 
Jane Bilton, baptised 30/5/1779, St Mary the Virgin, Old Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
(b)
Richard Bilton, baptised 1/12/1784, St Mary the Virgin, Old Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
x. James Bilton, baptised 27/10/1754, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]


St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold
St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold
Image Google StreetView
Brickyard Farm, Easingwold
Brickyard Farm, Easingwold
Image Martin Dawes [Geograph]
Cottages, Easingwold
Cottages, Easingwold
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Easingwold is a small market town and a civil parish in North Yorkshire, England. In 2001 it had a population of 4,233. Located 21 km north of York, at the foot of the Howardian Hills. The derivation of the name Easingwold may come from the word Ease meaning ‘rich irriguous land prone to water logging', and Wold or Weald meaning ‘wood or forest’. Another suggestion is that the name could have Saxon origins in the family name of ‘Esa’ therefore, the people becoming the ‘Easingas’. King John had a hunting lodge there and the Royal Forest of Galtres (no longer a forest) surrounded the area. A tesselated pavement and other Roman antiquities have been found at Easingwold. From the 1086 Domesday Survey: "In Easingwold are 12 carucates of land to the geld, which 7 ploughs could plough. Morcar held these as 1 manor TRE. Now it is in the king's hand, and there are 10 villans having 4 ploughs. [There is] a church with a priest. [There is] woodland pasture 2 leagues long and 2 broad. All together [it is] 3 leagues long and 2 broad. Then worth 32l ; now 20s. To this manor belongs the soke of these lands: in Huby, 4 carucates; in Moxby, 3 carucates; in Murton [in Sutton-on-the-Forest], 2 carucates; in 'Thorpe' [in Sutton-on-the-Forest], Sutton-on-the-Forest, Kelsit and Cold Kirby, 17 carucates; in Thormanby, 1 carucates; in Sandhutton, 6 carucates; in Sowerby [near Thirsk], 3 carucates, and 2 others belonging to the hall, with a mill which renders 20s. All together there are 39 carucates to the geld, which 20 ploughs could plough. There are only 2 villans and 4 bordars having 1 ploughs. The remaining land is waste. Yet there is woodland, pasture in some [places], 1 leagues in length and the same in breadth." Easingwold developed as a town of two communities. Uppleby forms the upper part of the town (of possible Danish origin, from a distinct village of settlers under the leadership of the Dane, Uplleby). The southern part developed along Long Street, or Low Street, as it used to known, and is thought to have been the settlement of the Angles. In 1221, the men of Easingwold paid the King with a palfrey, a small horse, for the privilege of holding a market every Saturday. In 1638 Charles I finally conveyed the market rights to George Hall on behalf of the town. Both High and Low Shambles were located in the centre of the market place where the butchers bought and sold their meat along with butter, bacon and a variety of other goods. The shambles have since been replaced by the Town Hall, built in 1864. The market continues to the present day. Little remains of the timber-framed houses with thatched roofs that were once scattered throughout the town’s streets. The Parish Church of St. John the Baptist and All Saints is situated on Church Hill to the north of the town. The present building dates from c.1400 when it was largely rebuilt. It comprises a chancel and nave, together with north and south aisles and a western tower. The interior of the church has undergone much restoration in recent years. The surrounding churchyard was extended in 1858 and 1886 and is still in use. In the 1800s the church contained a large coffin, made of oak, and secured at the joints with plates of iron, which (it is said) was used by the inhabitants in carrying dead bodies to the grave, previous to the introduction of coffins for interment, and on their arrival at the place of burial, the corpse was carefully taken out of this common coffin, and laid in the grave, with no other covering than the shroud![Wikipedia, GenUKI, Visit Easingwold]

St Andrew's, Rillington
St Andrew's, Rillington
Image Nigel Coates [Wikimedia Commons]
St Mary the Virgin, Old Malton
St Mary the Virgin, Old Malton
Image David Hillas [Geograph]
Thatched cottage, Old Malton
Thatched cottage, Old Malton
Image Colin Grice [Geograph]
St Mary's Priory, Old Malton, is located on Town Street, Old Malton. The Norman Church was founded in 1100 and completed in 1150. It is the only Gilbertine House, out of a total of 26 which originated in medieval England, which is still used for regular public worship. The church is today only one third of its original size.[Geograph] Old Malton is a parish in North Yorkshire, adjacent to New Malton. The parish church, dedicated to St. Mary, is an ancient structure, with the abbey-house and monastery adjoining. At one time St Mary's was the mother-church to St Michael and St Leonard, New-Malton; and has been built where stood the priory, founded by Eustachius, or Eustace Fitz-John, for canons of the order of St. Gilbert.[GenUKI]



1.2.2.1.2.1.1. Robert Billton (s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 30/10/1734, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Married unknown.

Children of Robert Bilton:

i.
 
John Bilton, baptised 14/2/1772, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[207]
*
ii.

Joseph Bilton, baptised 5/9/1773, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[207]

iii.

Thomas Bilton,[217] baptised 18/7/1775, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[207] Died between 1841-1851. Married Hannah,[215] about 1800. Hannah born 1781, died after 1851.[199,218] Resided 1841, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Living with Thomas & Hannah in 1841 was John Bilton, 7yo, presumably a grandson.[199] Hannah Resided 1851, Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218]
Children: (a)
 
John Bilton, baptised 25/6/1803, All Saints, Appleton Le Street, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(b)
George Bilton, baptised 19/6/1806, All Saints, Appleton Le Street, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(c) William Bilton, baptised 12/4/1812, All Saints, Appleton Le Street, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] Married Mary Taylor, 27/12/1842, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,220]
(d) Joseph Bilton, baptised 2/2/1815, All Saints, Appleton Le Street, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215] General labourer & widower, 1881.[127] Married Elizabeth[199] Parkinson, December quarter, 1838, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Elizabeth born 1816,[199] died September quarter, 1872, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (55yo).[220] Resided 1841, Rillington, near Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Resided 1881, with Kate Harrison, housekeeper, Commercial Street, Norton in Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (a)
 
George M. Bilton, born September quarter, 1840, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] With parents, 1841.[199] Died March quarter, 1864, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (25yo).[220]

iv.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 3/3/1777, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[207]

v.

Frances Bilton,[213,217] probably born between 1770-1785. {Probable daughter. At the time Frances had her son baptised at Appleton le Street, the only other Bilton in that village was Thomas, above. Note also that Frances' presumed father, Robert, had a sister named Frances}
Children: (a)
 
Robert Bilton, baptised 11/4/1802, St Mary's, Westow, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[213]
(b)
Isaac Belton, baptised 10/7/1803, All Saints, Appleton Le Street, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(c) Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 19/5/1811, St Andrew's, Rillington, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
vi.
George Bilton.[221] Died 1781 & buried 5/6/1781, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall with Norton le Clay, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[221]


St Mary and All Saints, Cundall
St Mary and All Saints, Cundall
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Crossroads, Cundall
Crossroads, Cundall
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
All Saints, Appleton le Street
All Saints, Appleton le Street
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Cundall is a parish in North Yorkshire. The Church is sited about a quarter of a mile north of the village & is dedicated to St Mary and All Saints. It is a substantial stone structure, rebuilt in 1854, in the Gothic style, and consists of nave, chancel, and tower, containing three bells and a clock. There is a rather finely carved Saxon cross shaft within. The parish contains the villages of Cundall & Norton le Clay & the hamlets of Fawdington & Leckby & covers an area of 3,566 acres, including roads and water, and is situated on the banks of the Swale. In 1821 there were 351 inhabitants; in 1851, 389; and in 1881, 301.[GenUKI] Appleton Le Street is a village & parish in North Yorkshire. It is situated near the river Rye. The name of the parish is derived from the fact of the Roman way (or street) to Aldborough ran through it. The church, dedicated to All Saints, is an ancient structure, the tower is the original Norman structure, although other parts of the church were restored in 1859. The church is of very old foundation. It may be that it stands on the site of a pagan temple, certainly it would appear that the site has been used for burials since Roman times. The earliest written reference to a church at Appleton exists in a charter of King Henry II (1154-1189). It is curiously omitted from the Domesday Book, yet it is beyond dispute that there was a church at that time. It is the tower which is the oldest part of the church. Built in late Saxon times, it is a particularly good example of the period; indeed it is said that it is one of the finest Anglo-Saxon towers in the north of England. The population of the village in 1821 was 173, & that of the parish was 873. In 1890 the parish covered an area of 5,617 acres, and had a population of 955.[GenUKI, The Street Parishes]

Appleton-Le-Street from church
Appleton-Le-Street from church
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
The Village c.1960, Appleton-Le-Street
The Village c.1960, Appleton-Le-Street
Image - Francis Frith
Commercial Street, Norton, 1910
Commercial Street, Norton, 1910
Image - Ryedale on the Net



1.2.2.1.2.1.2. Matthew Bilton (s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 19/8/1739, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203] Died 1823 & buried 12/2/1823, St Columba, Topcliffe with Dalton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (85yo).[221] Married Ann Allison, 14/8/1763, St Mary Chapelry, Bagby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[204] Possibly married 2nd Faith.[221] Faith Bilton, born 1752, died 1820 & buried 27/10/1820, St Columba, Topcliffe with Dalton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (68yo).[221]

Children of Matthew Bilton & Ann Allison:
i.
 
Robert Bilton, baptised 13/6/1764, St Mary Chapelry, Bagby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[204]
ii.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 15/3/1767, St Mary Chapelry, Bagby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[204]
iii.

Thomas Bilton, baptised 17/4/1770, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Died in infancy.
iv.

Thomas Bilton, baptised 27/12/1771, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Died in infancy.
* v.

George Bilton, baptised 2/3/1774, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205]
* vi.
Matthew Bilton, baptised 9/10/1777, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205]
vii.
Thomas Bilton, born 11/7/1780, baptised 17/9/1780, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Poulterer, 1823, 1831.[223,224] Grocer & tea dealer, 1823.[261] In 1823, 1831 attended the York market & resided for the duration at the White Horse Inn, Coppergate, York.[223,224] Married Elizabeth Andrew, 24/11/1808, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Resided 1823,1831, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[223,224,261]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Bilton, baptised 12/11/1809, Marton Cum Moxby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
(b)
Robert Bilton, baptised 24/2/1814, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]
(c) Bessy Bilton, baptised 4/1/1818, St John the Baptist & All Saints, Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[203]


St Wilfrid's, Kirby Knowle
St Wilfrid's, Kirby Knowle
Image Bill Henderson [Geograph]
St Mary's, Bagby
St Mary's, Bagby
Image David Rogers [Geograph]
The Roebuck Inn, Bagby
The Roebuck Inn, Bagby
Image David Rodgers [Geograph]
Bagby is a village and civil parish in North Yorkshire, just east of Thirsk. The parish had a population of 470 according to the 2001 census. In 1890 Bagby was a township of 1,794 acres, about 6.5 miles distant from the mother church, and geographically separate from the rest of Kirby Knowle. The township had a population of 242 in 1821. The name Bagby comes from an Old Norse personal name Baggi & Old Norse br, meaning "settlement" or "farmstead". Bagby is recorded in the Domesday Book as Bagebi/Baghebi. Prior to the 1900s Bagby was part of the parish of Kirby Knowle. At the time of the Domesday Survey, Baghebi was the head of a manor, to which there belonged six berewicks (grange or manor villages, from bere, barley), among which were included Kirby Knowle and Islebeck. The village of Bagby is situated on a gentle eminence 2 miles SE of Thirsk. There was a hospital for lepers founded here about the year 1200. Bagby possessed a church at a very early period, dedicated to St Mary, but it was subordinated to Kirby Knowle. In 1345, in consequence of the distance of the parish church and the bad state of the roads, license was granted to the inhabitants to bury their dead within their own chapelyard. The township of Balk is also included in the chapelry, the total area of which is 2,544 acres. The present building is an odd looking church, mainly due to its very unusual roof line, built in 1862 by E Lamb, who was noted for his eccentric designs. Richard Dobbes, Lord Mayor of London in 1551, was a native of Bagby. The parish of Kirby Knowle is situated in a valley, the Vale of Mowbray, surrounded by hills. The church, St Wilfred's, is a small ancient structure, the chancel of which was rebuilt in 1815. St Wilfred's was rebuilt in 1873 on the site of the old church, and consists of nave, chancel, square tower, and south porch. The pre-1873 church was built on the foundations of a still earlier church in the 1700s. A stone, carved on both sides with Runic characters, was unearthed in 1873 with the dedication to St. Wilfrid, indicating that an ancient Northumbrian church once stood on the site. In the Domesday Book Kirby Knowle was the berewic, or manor-village, to Bagby. It was then the property of Hugh, the son of Baldric, and tenanted by one Orm. Shortly afterwards the whole district was granted to Robert de Mowbray, then by the family of Lascelles. A castle was erected here, called Kirby Knowle Castle. About 1568 the castle was destroyed by fire, only one of the four towers remained. The castle was restored in the 1600s and renamed newbuilding and remains today. In 1881 the parish of Kirby Knowle covered an area of 4,328 acres and had a population of 462.[Wikipedia, GenUKI]

St Columba, Topcliffe
St Columba, Topcliffe
Image Bill Henderson [Geograph]
Long Street, Topcliffe, c.1953
Long Street, Topcliffe, c.1953
Image - Francis Frith
Cotter's House, Long Street, Topcliffe
Cotter's House, Long Street, Topcliffe
Image David Rodgers [Geograph]



1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1. Joseph Bilton (s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[200] born 1771,[198,199] baptised 5/9/1773, St Mary & All Saints, Cundall, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[207] Died June quarter, 1844, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Married Ann[198,199,200] Morrit, 18/3/1797, St Andrew, Langton By Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[201] Ann born 1774, died 1833 & buried 1/9/1833, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (59yo).[221] Married 2nd Ann Roberson, 18/5/1834, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] Ann born 1796.[198,199] Resided 1841, Whitwell On The Hill (Bulmer district), near Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198,199] Ann resided 1851, Scarborough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198] {Scarborough is east of Malton, on the coast}

Children of Joseph Bilton & Ann Morrit:
* i.
 
William Bilton, baptised 14/5/1797, St Andrew, Langton By Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[201]
* ii.

John Bilton, baptised 1/7/1799, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200]
iii.

Mary Bilton, baptised 15/6/1802, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] {Mother not listed on baptism}
Children: (a)
 
Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 2/2/1823, Scrayingham, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215]
iv.

Anne Belton, baptised 7/9/1804, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] {Mother not listed on baptism} Died 1829 & buried 13/3/1829, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (25yo).[221]
v.

James Bilton, baptised 25/12/1806, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] Died or left Co Yorkshire by 1841.[210]
vi.
Joseph Bilton,[199] born 26/7/1809, baptised 20/8/1809, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] Married Rachel Jackson, 19/4/1830, St Mary's, Westow, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[213] Not in Co Yorkshire 1841, 1851.[199,218]
vii.
Thomas Bilton, born 28/7/1812, baptised 23/8/1812, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] Died or left Co Yorkshire by 1841.[210]
* viii.
Jesse Bilton, born 1815[199]/1817[127,220]/1820[226]/1822[217,226], Whitwell On The Hill, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
* ix. Richard Bilton,[4,25,28,150,194] born 1822,[7,28,30,67,177] Co Yorkshire, England,[12,28,30,67,177] baptised 20/9/1822, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] {Father not listed on baptism, but father's name given on emigration record, dated 1844} Farm servant, 1844.[198] Resided 1841, Rillington, near Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England ('Belton').[199] Emigrated to Australia on the 'William Metcalf', arriving 3/1844.[198] According to his passenger record, Richard was single, a native of Whitwell, Yorkshire, s/o Joseph, a labourer, and Ann Bilton, he was 21yo, literate & Church of England.[198] Upon disembarking he was described as being "likely to be useful" in the colony.[198] Individuals from the Whitwell & Malton area certified his good character & the CoE minister from Whitwell certified his baptism in that church.[198] One of the individuals certifying Richard's character was T. W. Rivis (or River) of Wharrand-le-street, near Malton, Co Yorkshire, who was Richard's employer prior to his departure for Australia.[198]


St Andrew, Langton
St Andrew, Langton
Image J.Thomas [Geograph]
Cottages, Langton
Cottages, Langton
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
St Michael, Crambe
St Michael, Crambe
Image Phil Brown
Langton is a parish in East Riding, Co Yorkshire, about 3.5 miles south of Malton. The village, Langton, is small and located near the River Derwent, on the Wolds. The parish also contains the township of Kennythorpe. The soil in the valleys is clayey, but in the uplands it is of a lighter quality. The parish covers an area of 2,826 acres. The parish church, dedicated to St Andrew, was almost entirely rebuilt in 1822. Built of stone, it was originally erected in the 13th century. It consists of chancel, nave, south porch, and a small western tower containing two bells. The style is generally Early English. A new east window was erected in 1885. In 1821 the parish had a population of 280, in 1891 the population was 259. A National school for both sexes was built in 1841. A short distance from the village is Langton Wold, about 600 acres in extent. On one part of the summit are earth works, whence there is an extensive view. The camp is of triangular form and thought to be of pre-Roman origin.[GenUKI]

Village of Crambe
Village of Crambe
Image DS Pugh [Geograph]
Village of Crambe - hasn't changed much
Village of Crambe - hasn't changed much
Image DS Pugh [Geograph]
Gatehouse of Kirkham Priory, Crambe
Gatehouse of Kirkham Priory, Crambe
Image Matthew Hatton [Geograph]
Crambe is a parish in Co Yorkshire, 6 miles SW of Malton, situated on the river Derwent, covering 2,102 acres in 1891. The soil is generally rich and fertile. The small, but picturesque, village of Crambe, stands a short distance from the Derwent, in a wooded district opposite Kirkham Abbey. The ruins of Kirkham Priory are situated on the banks of the River Derwent near Crambe. The Augustinian priory was founded in 1125 by Walter l'Espec, lord of nearby Helmsley, who also built Rievaulx Abbey. The present ruins are mainly of the rebuilding in the 13th century. The parish church is dedicated to St Michael, is a stone structure in the early English style of architecture, originally erected in the Norman era, and partially rebuilt in the Early English period. The chancel arch, with its two massive pillars, belongs to the early building, as does also the lower part of the tower with its round-headed doorway. The church was restored in 1887 at a cost of 750, when an unsightly gallery was removed, the Early Gothic windows again opened out, and the old pews replaced by open benches of pitchpine. The east window is a double lancet, filled with stained glass. The church dates from the 11th century and is built from local sandstone, gritstone and some reused Roman masonry. There is the remains of a medieval mass dial on the south wall, i.e. a sundial with the times for mass marked on as well as the hours. Some of the 13th century windows survive and the tower is 15th century. In 1821 the parish population was 522, in 1891 the parish population was 398. Villages in the parish are Crambe, Barton-le-Willows & Whitwell-on-the-Hill. The name of Whitwell-on-the-Hill ts taken from the village well, the water of which is nearly the colour of milk. In 1860 Whitwell-on-the-Hill was constituted a distinct parish.[GenUKI, GeographWhitwell-on-the-Hill & Crambe]

St John's, Whitwell on the Hill
St John's, Whitwell on the Hill
Image Google StreetView
Whitwell Grange, Whitwell-on-The-Hill
Whitwell Grange, Whitwell-on-The-Hill
Image Phil Catterall [Geograph]
Rillington, c.1955
Rillington, c.1955
Image - Francis Frith
Whitwell, sometimes distinguished as Whitwell-on-the-Hill, was formerly a township in the parish of Crambe, but was constituted a distinct parish after the erection of the church in 1860. It derives its name from the spring of clear, sparkling water, which still flows in the park. The parochial boundaries are conterminous with those of the township, and inclose an area of 1,507 acres, containing 203 inhabitants, as of 1891. Whitwell-on-the-Hill is an ancient hamlet dating back to at least to the 11th century. The village stands on the York and Malton road, about six miles SW of Malton. The church, dedicated to St John the Evangelist, is a building of Whitby stone, erected in 1860 by George Edmund Street. The design is Gothic, and includes nave, chancel, vestry, and tower, surmounted by a spire. In the tower are six sweet-toned bells. The floor and the lower part of the walls up to the string course are laid with encaustic tiles of a very neat pattern. The interior is finished in very elegant style, and fitted with open benches of oak.[GenUKI, Whitwell-on-the-Hill & Crambe]



1.2.2.1.2.1.2.1. George Bilton (s/o Matthew Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[217] baptised 2/3/1774, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Died September quarter, 1855, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Was a witness at the marriage of Thomas Harrison & Elizabeth Spenslay, 6/4/1817, All Saints, Slingsby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[233] Married Ann Chapman,[217] 29/10/1800, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Ann born 1781,[199] died June quarter, 1842, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided 1841,1851, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,218]

Children of George Bilton & Ann Chapman:
i.
 
Robert Bilton, born 9/5/1801, baptised 26/12/1801, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Died September quarter, 1851, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Married Mary Hall, 21/5/1823, St Nicholas, Stillington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215] Mary born 1805,[199,210] died September quarter, 1864, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided 1841, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Mary resided 1851,1861, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,218]
Children: (a)
 
William Bilton, born 1825.[199] Died 1841.[218] With parents, 1841.[199]
(b)
Thomas Bilton, born 1828.[199,210] Died September quarter, 1871, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (41yo).[220] With parents, 1841.[199] Married Ann.[210] Ann born 1824,[210] died December quarter, 1869, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (48yo).[220] Resided 1861, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
Children: (1)
 
Aaron Bilton, born March quarter, 1852,[127,210,220] Easingwold, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1861.[210] Joiner, 1881.[127] Married Mary.[127] Mary born 1848, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1881, No.11 North Street, All Saints, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
(2)
Mary Jane Bilton, born 1856.[210] With parents, 1861.[210]
(3) Grantley John Bilton, born December quarter, 1857, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,220] Died March quarter, 1880, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided 1861 with parents.[210]
(4) Ada Bilton, born September quarter, 1860, Easingwold district, district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,220] Resided 1861 with parents.[210]
(c) Robert Bilton, born 1828.[199,218] With parents, 1841.[199] With mother, 1851.[218]
(d) Ralph Hall Bilton, born 1832,[127,199,210] Crayke, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Died March quarter, 1907, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (73yo).[220] Carter, 1881, 1890.[127,263] With parents, 1841.[199] With mother, 1851.[218] Married Sarah[210] Ann Bruce, June quarter 1855, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Sarah born 1836,[210] died December quarter, 1925, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (78yo).[220] Resided 1861, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1881,1890, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,263]
Children: (1)
 
Mary Bilton, born 1854, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1861 with parents.[210]
(2)
Harriet Bilton, born June quarter, 1858, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,220] Died September quarter, 1931, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (73yo).[220] Resided 1861 with parents.[210]
(3) Walter Bilton, born September quarter, 1860, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,220] Died June quarter, 1889, Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided 1861 with parents.[210]
(4)Thomas Bilton, born 1862, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Apprentice shoemaker, 1881.[127] Boot & shoe maker, 1890.[263] Resided 1881, with Christopher Ellis, farmer & shoemaker, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1890, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[263]
(5) Hannah Bilton, born March quarter, 1867, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,220] With parents, 1881.[127]
(6) Ralph Bilton, born December quarter, 1869, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,220] With parents, 1881.[127] Married Ellen Bradley, September quarter, 1898, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(7) Ellen Bilton, born December quarter, 1871, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
(8) Elizabeth Bilton, born December quarter, 1875, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
(9) Frederic Bilton, born December quarter, 1879, Crayke, Easingwold district, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
(e) Ann Bilton, born 1834.[199] With parents, 1841.[199]
(f) Elizabeth Bilton, born 1836.[199,218] With parents, 1841.[199] With mother, 1851.[218]
(g) William Bilton, born 1841.[218] With mother, 1851.[218]
(h) Mary Bilton, born 1842, born December quarter, 1842[218,220] Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] With mother, 1851.[218]
(i) John Bilton, born 1843.[218] With mother, 1851.[218]
(j) Hannah Bilton, born December quarter, 1845[210,218,220] Easingwold district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] With mother, 1851,1861.[210,218]
ii.

John Bilton, baptised 6/3/1803, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208,217]
iii.

Susan Bilton,[208] probably born between 1800-1810. Died before 1841.[199] Married Turner Young, 22/9/1827, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Turner born 1801.[199] Turner resided, 1841, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199]
iv.

Matthew Bilton, baptised 26/2/1809, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208,217] Farm labourer, 1881.[127] Did not marry.[127] Resided 1851, Kirky Moorside, near Helsley, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] Resided 1881, Wombleton Village, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
v.

John Bilton, born 1814, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,210,218] Died between 1861-1881. Married Sarah Nixon, 13/7/1839, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208,220] Sarah born 1818, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[127,199,210,218] died March quarter, 1903, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (86yo).[220] In 1881 Sarah was a farmer of 15 acres.[127] Farmer, 1890.[262] John s/o George.[208] Resided 1841,1851, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,218] Resided 1861, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Sarah resided, 1881,1890, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,262]
Children: (a)
 
Susannah Bilton, born September quarter, 1840,[220] baptised 29/9/1840, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Died September quarter, 1840, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(b)
Matthew Bilton, born March quarter, 1841,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,218] With parents, 1851.[218] Living with mother, 1881.[127] Waiter, 1881.[127]
(c) William Bilton, born March quarter, 1845,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,218] Died 24/2/1867, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (23yo).[220,232] With parents, 1851.[218] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
(d) Anne Bilton, born June quarter, 1847,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,218] With parents, 1851.[218] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
Children: (1)
 
William Belton, born June quarter, 1867,[220] baptised 12/7/1867, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Died June quarter, 1931, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (64yo).[220] Resided, 1881, with grandmother, Sarah Bilton.[127]
(2)
Frederick Bilton, born September quarter, 1870,[220] baptised 18/9/1870, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208]
(e) Mary Bilton, born December quarter, 1848,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,218] With parents, 1851.[218] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
(f) Sarah Bilton, born September quarter, 1850,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,218] With parents, 1851.[218] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Married Thomas Willis, 19/5/1875, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Sarah d/o John Bilton.[208]
(g) John Bilton, born March quarter, 1853,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Died September quarter, 1929, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (76yo).[220] Agricultural labourer, 1881.[127] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Married Hephizibah Bird, 31/7/1879, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208,220] Hepizibah was a domestic cook, 1881.[127] Hephzibah died June quarter, 1927, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (72yo).[220] John s/o John Bilton.[208] Resided 1881, with Anne Worsley, annuitant, Morning Side, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (1)
 
George William Bilton, born March quarter, 1881,[220] baptised 12/6/1880, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] With parents, 1881.[127]
(h) Elizabeth Bilton, born June quarter, 1855,[220] Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
(i) George Bilton, born March quarter, 1858,[220] Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[210] baptised 19/3/1857, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Agricultural labourer, 1881.[127] Resided 1861, with parents, Goole, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1881, Ebenezer Cottages, Norton in Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Married Agnes,[217] between 1881-1884.
Children: (1)
 
Arthur William Bilton, born March quarter, 1884,[220] baptised 15/4/1884, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(2)
Thomas Harold Bilton, born September quarter, 1888,[220] baptised 7/10/1888, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
vi.
Thomas Edward Bilton, baptised 8/8/1820, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Gardener, 1881.[127] Did not marry.[127] Resided, 1841, with parents, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Resided 1881, 20 Primrose Street, Leeds, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]

vii.
Ann Bilton, born 1828.[199] Resided, 1841, with parents, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199]


All Saints, Hovingham
All Saints, Hovingham
Image Nigel Coates [Wikimedia Commons]
Brookside, Hovington, c.1900
Brookside, Hovington, c.1900
Image - Hovingham Village
Hovingham Village, 1965
Hovingham Village, 1965
Image - Francis Frith
Hovingham is a large village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. It is on the edge of the Howardian Hills and about 7 miles west of Malton. The parish is of large extent, townships of Hovingham, Aryholme with Howthorpe and Baxton howe, Coulton, Fryton, East Ness, Scackleton, South Holme, and Wath, having an aggregate area of 8,922 acres, and a population of 1,164 in 1881. In 1821 the population was 649. Hovingham, the town, formerly a market town, is situated in the vale of Ryedale. The surface is generally hilly and wooded. While the ancient Britons left no traces of their occupation of Hovingham, it is certain that the Romans had either a camp or villa here, which may possibly have occupied the site of a British village. A Roman vicinal way from Malton to Isurium (Aldburgh) passed through Hovingham, and it is thought that there was a fort with a bath, tesselated pavement, and other evidences of Roman luxury discovered in good preservation in 1745. Other Roman remains include a sarcophagus & traces of a villa. Hovingham appears in the Domesday Book, wherein it is recorded that "In Hovingham, Orm had eight carucates of land to be taxed. There is land for four ploughs. Hugh, the son of Baldric, has now there two ploughs, and 10 villeins having four ploughs. There is a church and a priest." Soon after the Conquest, Hovingham was granted to Roger de Mowbray, who is supposed to have built a castle here, or more probably restored and fortified the house of its Saxon owners. The parish church is dedicated to All Saints and is a very ancient foundation, but, with the exception of the Saxon tower, was rebuilt and a south aisle added in 1860. The 1860 rebuilding was undertaken by Rhode Hawkins with considerable care - the ancient Saxon tower was left untouched; certain early features of the medieval church were built back into the new structure, which is itself entirely in 13th-century style; the lines of the original walls were exactly followed, with the addition of a south aisle to accommodate the increased population of the time. The present church is thus exactly the same length as its predecessor, though its nave is now balanced by two aisles. It consists of chancel, nave, with aisles of four bays each, organ chamber, south porch, and a west tower, containing six bells and a clock. The church also features a large 10th-century altar cross.[GenUKI, Wikipedia, Hovingham]

Front Street, Topcliffe
Front Street, Topcliffe
Image Gordon Hatton [Geograph]
Northern end of village, Wombleton
Northern end of village, Wombleton
Image Colin Grice [Geograph]
Chapel Lane, Easingwold
Chapel Lane, Easingwold
Image Alan Murray-Rust [Geograph]
Topcliffe is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. The village is situated on the River Swale, about five miles south-west of Thirsk. The parish includes the townships of Dalton-with-Islebeck, Eldmire-with-Crakehill, and Topcliffe, Asenby, Baldersby, Dishforth, Marton-le-Moor and Rainton-with-Newby. In 1891 the parish covered 14,715 acres. In 1821 the population was 659, this had risen to 2,261 by 1881 and has changed little 120 years later when it had risen slightly to 2,690. The village is picturesquely seated on the crest of an eminence rising boldly from the east bank of the Swale, about 4.5 miles SW of Thirsk. Although it has "dwindled to the quietude of a rural village," it was once a market town of considerable importance and it is reasonable to assume from the name of its tutelar saint (Columba) that it had its church in early Saxon times. In 946 "King Edred came to Tadenclif (Topcliffe), and there Wulstan, tharchebyshop of Yorke, and al the Northumbrian witan plighted their troth to the King, and al the nobilitie of the northe countrie made their homage to Edred, the king of England, at this towne." As soon as Edred and his army had departed, the Northumbrians renounced their allegiance and chose Eric, the Dane, to reign over them. Whereupon Edred again marched his army into Yorkshire, burnt the minster at Ripon, ravaged the country, and so harried the people that they were fain to renew their submission, and purchase his clemency by large sums of money. In the reign of Edward the Confessor, the manor of Topclive, as it is spelt in Domesday Book, was held by Bernulf, but after the Conquest, this, and many other manors, were given by the Conqueror to William de Percy. From Domesday Book: "In the manor of Crakehill, Dalton, Asenby, Skyeton, Bernulf had 26 carucates of land to be taxed, where they may be 15 ploughs. William has now three ploughs and five villeins, and 14 borders with 13 ploughs. There is a church there and two priests, having one plough and one mill of five shillings, wood pasture, four quarentens long and four broad. The whole manor three miles long and two broad. Value in King Edward's time, 4, now, 100 shillings." Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland was killed at Topcliffe in 1489 when he proclaimed a poll tax there on behalf of Henry VII precipitating the Yorkshire Rising. Once the seat of the Percy family, by the early 1800s, all that remains was the moated mound on which it stood. The Church is dedicated to the Scoto-Irish saint, Columba, from which it is inferred that the first edifice was erected in early Saxon times. It was, with the exception of the chancel end, wholly rebuilt in 1855. The ancient sedilia and piscina still remain in the south wall of the chancel. The church now consists of nave, north aisle, chancel, tower, and porch. In addition to the parish church are the district churches of Baldersby, Dishforth, Martin-le-Moor and Skipton Bridge.[Wikipedia, GenUKI]

St Nicholas, Stillington
St Nicholas, Stillington
Image Alison Stamp [Geograph]
St Cuthbert's, Crayke
St Cuthbert's, Crayke
Image Google StreetView
Crayke, from church tower, 1800s
Crayke, from church tower, 1800s
Image - Crayke Village
Stillington is a parish in North Yorkshire, 4 miles SE of Easingwold. The village is situated on the Fosse. The parish church is dedicated to St Nicholas. In 1821 the parish had a population of 698.[GenUKI] Crayke is a village and civil parish in the Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, about two miles east of Easingwold. In 1890 the parish covered 2,779 acres. The parish was formerly a detached part of County Durham (until 1844), due to its connection with St Cuthbert and the Bishop of Durham, who had a castle at Crayke. Given that Crayke enjoys a striking location on the first hill north of the flat vale of York, it seems likely that its name derives from the word ‘crag’ or something similar. In 1821 the population was 538, which was little changed by 1881 when it had dropped slightly to 501. The village is situated on the southern declivity of a hill, on the summit of which stands the ruins of Crayke Castle, which is thought to have been a Roman fortress, and which in the time of the Saxons was a royal palace & later a Norman castle. Evidence of Roman occupation was finally discovered in the mid 1900s with indications of a sizable settlement, including a temple. The seventh-century king Egfrith granted Crayke to the church in 685 to be used by Cuthbert on his visits to York, to which end Cuthbert founded a monastery there, then known as 'Creca'. Cuthbert died in 687AD, which continued to flourish until the invasion of the country by the Danes when it was destroyed and never rebuilt. The Northumbrian King Aelle appropriated Crayke and used it as his headquarters during the unsuccessful campaign against the Danes in 867. In Norman times the Bishops of Durham constructed a castle over the monastic cemetery. The old castle on Crayke hill was destroyed in 1646 by order of Parliament and the manor of Crayke was sold to William Allenson. Allenson’s son, Charles, repaired and restored the 15th century Great Chamber and this is essentially all that remains of the castle today. In 1780 the castle was used as a farmhouse; the main ground-level room had an earth floor and probably was used as the kitchen, with the vaulted undercroft, originally a store room set below an earlier kitchen of which nothing remains, serving as a cattle shed. Near the ruins of the castle (which is now occupied as a farm house) stands the church, which is dedicated to St. Cuthbert, built of stone in the Gothic style. The Church, dedicated to St Cuthbert, stands near the site of castle, a little below the crest of the hill, and the present building is thought to have been erected about the time of Henry VII. Remains on the site indicate teh church existed as early as the early 800s AD. There is evidence of Christian settlement in Crayke as early as the 600sAD, although whether this meant there was a church there at the time is unknown. Much of the present church building dates from around 1490. The north aisle was added in 1863 and the original roof timbers replaced at the same time. Most of the interior furnishings date to the 1600's.[Wikipedia, GenUKI, Crayke Village]



1.2.2.1.2.1.2.2. Matthew Bilton (s/o Matthew Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 9/10/1777, St Columbia, Topcliffe By Thirsk, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[205] Died 22/4/1866, Hutton, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (91yo).[220,232] Married Elizabeth Ann Lawson, 10/11/1804, All Saints, Slingsby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[209,233] Elizabeth died before 1841.[199] Resided 1841, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199]

Children of Matthew Bilton & Elizabeth Ann Lawson:
i.
 
George Bilton, baptised 25/7/1805, All Saints, Slingsby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[209] Died December quarter, 1875, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (69yo).[220] Tenant farmer, 1834, farm had an annual rent of 50 and upwards.[264] Listed on the 1834 Electoral Roll for Burythorpe.[264] Married Ann Coverdale, 11/4/1831, St Andrew, Bugthorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[211] Ann born 1806, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,218] Resided 1834, Burythorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[264] Resided 1841, Escrick, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Resided 1851, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218]
Children: (a)
 
Matthew Coverdale Bilton,[217] born 1831/1832,[199] baptised 11/3/1832, St Andrew, Bugthorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[211] Died December quarter, 1874, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (43yo).[220] Married Ellen.[210,217] Ellen born 1836,[210] Pickering, Co Yorkshire, England,[127] & died June quarter, 1892, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (55yo).[220] Resided, 1841, with parents, Escrick, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Resided 1861, Driffield, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1881, Broughton Road, Old Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (1)
 
John Bilton, born March quarter, 1853, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,220] Died June quarter, 1863, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided with parents, 1861.[210]
(2)
Anne Eliza Bilton, born 1859,[127,210] Holderness, Aldbrough, England.[127] Resided with parents, 1861.[210]
(3) Mary Jane Bilton, born June quarter,[220] 1865, Norton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[127] baptised 31/10/1869, Rillington, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(b)
Mary Bilton, born 1833,[199] baptised 9/6/1833, All Saints, Burythorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[212] Resided, 1841, with parents, Escrick, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199]
(c) Jane Bilton, born 1835,[199] baptised 10/5/1835, All Saints, Burythorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[212] Resided, 1841, with parents, Escrick, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199]
(d) Betsy Hicks Bilton, baptised 6/11/1836, All Saints, Burythorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[212] Died 1837 & buried 9/3/1837, St Martin, Bulmer, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (4mo).[221]
(e) Elizabeth Coverdale Bilton, born March quarter, 1838,[199,220] baptised 7/1/1838, All Saints, Burythorpe, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[212] Died September quarter, 1838, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(f) John Coverdale Bilton, born 1841, Stillingfleet, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,199] Died 14/5/1885, Slingsby, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (43yo).[220,225] With parents 1841, 1851.[199,218] Retired farmer, 1881.[127] Married Jane.[127] Jane born 1853, North Dalton, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1881, Slingsby, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (a)
 
Annie Maria Bilton, born December quarter,[220] 1868, Welburn, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
(b)
Gertrude Bilton, born December quarter,[220] 1870, Hutton Ambo, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
(c) George Bilton, born March quarter,[220] 1874, Hutton Ambo, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] With parents, 1881.[127]
ii.

Elizabeth Bilton, baptised 27/11/1808, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[209]
iii.

John Bilton, baptised 12/2/1815, All Saints, Hovingham, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[208] Died between 1843-1851. Coal merchant, 1840, 1841.[267,268] Married Sarah Ann Metcalf, 28/5/1834, Saint Michael, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,217] Sarah born 1816,[199,210,218,267] Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] In 1857 Sarah was a farmer & proprietor of the Black Swan.[265] Resided 1840, 1841, Low Street, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,267,268] Sarah resided 1851, Myton, Hull, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] Sarah resided 1857, 1861, Brandesburton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,265] Resided 1867, St Nicholas Sr., Norton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[270]
Children: (a)
 
James Thomas Bilton, born 1834,[267] baptised 9/8/1834, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1841.[199,267] Missing 1851,1861.[210,218]
(b)
William Bilton, born December quarter, 1837,[220,267] baptised 6/12/1837, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1841.[199,267] Resided 1851, Hutton Buskell, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] With mother, 1861, Brandesburton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210]
(c) Ralph Johnson Bilton, born December quarter, 1839,[220,267] baptised 22/1/1840, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1841.[199,267] With mother, 1851.[218] Missing 1861.[210]
(d) Jane Bilton, born June quarter, 1841, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,220,267] School mistress, 1871.[267] With parents, 1841.[199,267] Resided 1851, Brandesburton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (not with mother).[218] With mother, 1861, Brandesburton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Resided 1871, 29 Yorkersgate, St Michael, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267]
(e) John Bilton, born March quarter, 1844,[220] Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Missing, 1851.[218] With mother, 1861, Brandesburton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210] Commercial corn trade traveller, 1881.[127] Married Sarah E.[127] Sarah born 1845, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1881, New Street, Liversedge, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (1)
 
Annie L. Bilton, born 1870, Liverpool, Co Lancashire, England.[127] Living with parents, 1881.[127]
(2)
Lilian Bilton, born 1873, Liverpool, Co Lancashire, England.[127] Living with parents, 1881.[127]
(3) Jesse Bilton, born 1876, Huddersfield, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Living with parents, 1881.[127]
(4) John C. Bilton, born 1878, Huddersfield, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Living with parents, 1881.[127]
(5) Maggie Bilton, born 1881, Huddersfield, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Living with parents, 1881.[127]
(f) Christopher Bilton, born 1846, Myton, Hull, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] With mother, 1851.[218]
(g)Annie E. Bilton, born 1850/1851, Hull, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267] Governess, 1871.[267] Resided, 1867, with sister Jane, 29 Yorkersgate, St Michael, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267]


St Margaret of Scotland & St Barnabas, Huttons Ambo
St Margaret & St Barnabas, Huttons Ambo
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
Cottages, High Hutton
Cottages, High Hutton
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
All Saints, Slingsby
All Saints, Slingsby
Image Roger Gilbertson [Geograph]
Huttons Ambo is a parish in North Riding , Co Yorkshire, 2.5 miles SW of Malton. The parish, located on north-west bank of the River Derwent, contains the villages of High Hutton and Low Hutton (Hutton upon Derwent), hence the name of the parish, from the Latin 'ambo', meaning both. Remains of a Roman villa were discovered in the parish. The village of High Hutton stands on the higher ground, about a mile from the river and three miles SW of Malton. Low Hutton village is situated on the west bank of the Derwent, near Huttons Ambo station, and about half-a-mile from High Hutton. The parish population was 445 in 1821. In 1881 the parish covered 2,819 acres & had a population of 415. There is a small church, dedicated to St. Margaret. The present building was erected in 1856, in the Gothic style, near the site of an older dilapidated building. It consists of chancel, nave, north aisle, south porch, and a gable belfrey with two bells. The interior was renovated in 1871.[GenUKI]

Cottages, High Street, Slingsby
Cottages, High Street, Slingsby
Image Roger Gilbertson [Geograph]
Cottages, Hovingham
Cottages, Hovingham
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
St Andrew, Bugthorpe
St Andrew, Bugthorpe
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
Slingsby, a parish in North Yorkshire, is about 6 miles NW of Malton & 6 miles north of Whitwell. In 1821 the parish population was 548. In 1881 the parish covered 2,363 acres and had a population of 596. Slingsby began as a Danish settlement ‘Eslingesbi’ - the abode of Eslinc - and appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Selungesbi’ having “a priest and fourteen carucates of land to be taxed.” (A carucate was the amount of land that an eight-strong team of oxen could plough in a year, roughly about 160 acres, or 65 hectares). Amotherby, some 4 miles east, was also of Danish origin, interspersed along the Street with the older Anglian villages of Hovingham, Barton-le-Street and Appleton-le-Street. 'The Street' is the name given to the old Roman road from Hovingham to Malton. The parish church of Slingsby is All Saints. Although Domesday Book recorded Slingsby’s priest, it is not until 1157 that there is any written evidence of a church building when it is mentioned in a charter. In the 15th century the old church was heightened and a tower built. In the early 19th century the chancel had to be rebuilt and by the 1800s further deterioration had so advanced that complete demolition was necessary, and in 1867 it was pulled down, the rebuilding taking two years.[The Street, GenUKI]

Main Street, Bugthorpe
Main Street, Bugthorpe
Image Roger Gilbertson [Geograph]
All Saints, Burythorpe
All Saints, Burythorpe
Image Nigel Coates [Wikimedia Commons]
Cottages, Burythorpe
Cottages, Burythorpe
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
Bugthorpe is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England about 19km east of York. The village is just south of the border with North Yorkshire. The 1821 population was 281. In 1891 the parish covered 1,990 acres & had a population of 232. In 2001 the civil parish had a population of 122. Bugthorpe, or Buckthorpe, is a place of considerable antiquity, and had its church in Saxon times. It is recorded in Domesday Book: "Land of the Archbishop of York. In Bughetorp are four carucates and a half to be taxed; there may be two ploughs there. Clibert had there one manor. St. Peter has now there two farmers (censarios), who pay twenty shillings and four pence. There are eight acres of meadow, value, in King Edward's time, five shillings. Land of Odo Arbalistarius, East Riding manor. In Buchetorp, Forne had four carucates of land and a half to be taxed. There is land to as many ploughs. Odo Arbalistarius has there one plough and three villanes with one plough, and eight acres of meadow, value, in King Edward's time, twenty shillings, now ten shillings." There is some uncertainty as to the origin of the name. In Saxon phraseology it was Buche-torp, but the Normans having no equivalent sound in their language for the guttural "ch," pronounced it Bugtorp, or, as written in Domesday Book, Buge-torp. Subsequently Bugthorpe became the fixed pronunciation and spelling of the name. The church, which is dedicated to St. Andrew, is an ancient stone edifice, consisting of chancel, choir, nave, and an embattled western tower. It was originally founded in Saxon times, and re-built in the Norman style soon after the Conquest. In this re-construction the original tower appears to have been retained, as shown by certain indications of Saxon work in the west wall. About the beginning of the 13th century the tower was re-built, the old Saxon piers or walling being retained, upon which an Early English arch was placed. The Norman nave was re-built on a somewhat larger scale in 1859. The upper stage of the tower was re-built and leaded in 1878. There are a few ancient monuments in the church. On the floor of the chancel is a sarcophagus-shaped tomb, supposed to belong to the 11th or 12th century, but without inscription to show whose ashes repose beneath.[Wikipedia, GenUKI] Burythorpe is a small parish and township, in East Riding, Co Yorkshire, 5 miles south of Malton, covering 1,250 acres. The population in 1821, including Thornthorpe, was 216. By 1891 the population was  little changed, with 227 residents. The church is dedicated to All Saints. & was rebuilt in 1858 on the site of the old Norman church. It is a handsome structure of stone, in the Early English style of architecture, and consists of chancel, nave, vestry and western turret. The church crowns an eminence near the village, and forms a prominent object in the landscape.[GenUKI]

Malton, 1784
Malton, 1784
Etching - Samuel Middiman [Malton History]
Northern side of Westgate, Old Malton
Northern side of Westgate, Old Malton
Image Alan Walker [Geograph]
Brandesburton
Black Swan Inn, Brandesburton
Image J.Thomas [Geograph]



1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1.1. William Bilton (s/o Joseph Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), baptised 14/5/1797, St Andrew, Langton By Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[201] Married Priscilla.[200,213] {No trace of William, Priscilla or their children apart from James in the 1841 census. Was James the sole survivor or did he remain behind when the rest of his family emigrated?}

Children of William Bilton & Priscilla:
i.
 
Jane Bilton, baptised 14/5/1825, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200]
ii.

John Bilton, baptised 18/3/1827, St Mary's, Westow, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[213]
iii.

James Bilton, born 1826,[127,198,199] Whitwell, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,210] Died December quarter, 1908, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (81yo).[220] In 1851 was employed by John Carr of Hutton Hill Farm, Rillington, near Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198] Living with grandparents, 1841.[198,199] Farmer of 80 acres, 1881.[127] Farmer, 1890.[266] Married 1st Hannah.[214] Hannah born 1812,[218] died between 1852-1856.[210] Married 2nd Maria Tate, 15/1/1856, St Mary the Virgin, Alne, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[215] Maria born 1816,[127,210] Coneysthorpe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] d/o William Thompson.[215] James 30yo at time of his 2nd marriage.[215] Resided, 1841, with grandparents, Joseph & Ann Bilton, Whitwell On The Hill (Bulmer district), near Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198,199] Resided, 1851, Rillington, near Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198,218] Resided, 1861, Mowthorpe, near Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[198,210] Resided 1881,1890, Mowthorpe, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,266]
Children: (a)
 
Sarah Anne Bilton, born December quarter, 1843,[220] baptised 20/12/1843, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] Died March quarter, 1844, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(b)
Priscilla Bilton, born June quarter, 1845,[220] baptised 8/6/1845, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214] Resided, 1851, 1861, with parents (as Maria in 1861).[210,218]
(c) James Louis Bilton, born December quarter, 1846,[220] baptised 26/12/1846, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214] Died December quarter, 1848, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(d) Henry Bilton, born June quarter, 1846,[220] baptised 30/5/1849, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214] Resided, 1851, 1861, with parents.[210,218] Not in Co Yorkshire, 1881.[127]
(e) Mary Hannah Bilton, born September quarter, 1852,[220] baptised 12/8/1852, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214]
(f) Ann Bilton, born December quarter, 1856, Mowthorpe,[127,210,220] baptised 17/12/1856, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214] {Mother Maria} Resided, 1861,1881, with parents.[127,210]
(g) Samuel 'Mennell' Bilton, born June quarter, 1859, Mowthorpe,[127,210,220] baptised 12/7/1859, All Saints, Terrington, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[214] Died March quarter, 1903, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided, 1861,1881, with parents.[127,210]
iv.

Thomas Bilton, baptised 14/9/1828, St Mary's, Westow, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[213]


Crambe from Bossall to Kirkham Road
Crambe from Bossall to Kirkham Road
Image DS Pugh [Geograph]
St Mary, Westow
St Mary, Westow, c.1965
Image - Francis Frith
Stone Cottages, Westow
Stone Cottages, Westow
Image - Wikipedia
Westow is a village and parish in the Ryedale district of the county of North Yorkshire, England, six miles south from Malton. The village is situated on an eminence, whence it likely derives its name of Westow, that is, West howe or hill. The village has deep associations with agriculture and is surrounded by a traditional, diverse farming landscape, much of it estate owned and managed. The village has views to the North Yorkshire Moors National Park to the east, and the Yorkshire Wolds to the south. In 1821 the population was 423, which has steadily decreased ever since, dropping to 315 by 1891 and to about 300 in 2001. Parish records of graves dating back to 1500s build a view of a small community established around agriculture. It is highly likely the village origins are older than this as the Ryedale area has significant evidence of Medieval and Roman settlement and activity. In all probability the location of Westow was originally chosen and occupied at a time when farming techniques were undeveloped and people were highly dependent on the natural environment and what it can provide. Westow is surrounded by fertile soils with good irrigation, and in the lee of the hill it is partly sheltered from north and easterly winds. These characteristics are likely to have led to the location of Westow being chosen for settlement. The oldest part of Westow village lies within a conservation area and is south of the village pub, along 'Main Street'. Property predominantly comprises detached, semi-detached and terraced houses and cottages, finished in traditional local sandstone with red pan-tile roofs. The parish is bounded on bounded on the north and west by the river Derwent and contains the townships of Westow, Eddlethorpe, Firby and Mennythorpe, comprising a total area of 3,016 acres. The church of St. Mary is an ancient edifice of stone, standing about half-a-mile from the village. It is in the Early English style, and consists of chancel, nave, north aisle, south porch, and an embattled western tower. The church underwent some repairs in 1821-1822, and in 1864 it was again thoroughly restored and the north aisle added. Two or three of the farmhouses bear the name of Grange, indicating their monastic ownership in days long gone by.[Wikipedia, GenUKI]

St Mary the Virgin, Alne
St Mary the Virgin, Alne
Image Alison Stamp [Geograph]
All Saints, Terrington
All Saints, Terrington
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
Terrington village, 1905
Terrington village, 1905
Image - Terrington Villiage
Terrington is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, situated in the Howardian Hills, 6 miles south-west of Malton. All Saints, the parish church, is perched a little above the village street & looks along the Howardian ridge eastwards towards Castle Howard and Malton, west along the old ridge road towards Easingwold, north to the Vale of Pickering and south, beyond Sheriff Hutton, to York. A mile or two distant are the three Thorpes, which started as Anglo Saxon settlements. Ganthorpe, now a hamlet, was once the centre of a larger farming community. Mowthorpe has been a backwater, even in this parish, for four hundred years. Wiganthorpe, once a great Estate, now has just a remnant of the old Hall, a farm and a few houses. The name Terrington is itself Saxon, possibly from Tiefrung, a picture, hinting at an older history of a Roman villa and mosaic floors. Little survives in the village, apart from the church, from before the Victorian era. In 1821 the parish population was 617. In 1851 the village population was over 650 and it had about 20 farms of around 100 acres, some owned, but most tenanted from the Estates of Castle Howard, Wiganthorpe or the Church. In 1891 the population had risen slightly to 685, most of whom lived in the townsship of Terrington, & the parish covered 3,630 acres. By 1912 the population had plummeted to 450. Terrington is a reminder that many apparently old English villages were actually nineteenth century developments, made possible by the Enclosures and the agricultural, industrial and transport revolutions. There are few buildings in Terrington which show any external parts from before the Enclosures. Any old structures still standing have been embraced by more recent building work. Most Terrington homes before 1800 were probably pretty basic. The Church, dedicated to All Saints, has some Saxon remnants, and its site was probably a place of worship even earlier. The present building is largely of Norman construction & style, consisting of nave, chancel, north aisle, porch, and tower. One of the tower bells, dating to 1100, appears to have come from Kirkham Priory. The church was restored in 1870, largely in keeping with the existing design.[GenUKI, Wikipedia, Terrington]

High Street, Rillington, c.1960
High Street, Rillington, c.1960
Image - Francis Frith
Brandrith Farm, Mowthorpe
Brandrith Farm, Mowthorpe
Image Stephen Horncastle [Geograph]
Primrose Farm, Mowthorpe
Primrose Farm, Mowthorpe
Image Phil Catterall [Geograph]
1891: Mowthorpe, called Mulethorpe in Domesday Book, is an estate diversified with romantic valleys and scenic uplands. It formerly belonged to a family styled De Multhorpe, and was subsequently held by the Mallorys, Salvins, Langton, and Danbys. It is divided into four farms, and was anciently a distinct manor, as appears from the will of Anketinus Salvayne, Esq., proved 17th June, 1351, wherein he bequeaths his soul to be buried in the parish church of Tyryngton, and all his goods, both within and without his manor of Multhorpe, to Nicholas, his son. The estate is now the property of the Earl of Carlisle.[GenUKI]



1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1.2. John Bilton (s/o Joseph Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest),[217] baptised 1/7/1799, St Michael, Crambe, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[200] {Mother not listed on baptism} Died between 1851-1861. ostler, 1832.[422] Labourer, 1841.[267] Married Mary Hesp, 9/12/1828, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Mary born 1801,[199,267] died March quarter, 1854, Malton district, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Resided 1832, Queensgate (?), Malton, Co Yorkshire.[422] Resided 1841, Rider's Square, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,267] Resided 1851, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218]

Children of John Bilton & Mary Hesp:
i.
 
Thomas Bilton, born 1829, Malton,[267] baptised 9/12/1829, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Died September quarter, 1891, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (59yo).[220] With parents, 1841 (11yo).[199,267] Pork butcher, 1858, 1861, 1867.[267,269,270] Butcher, 1871.[267] Life Insurance Agent, 1881.[127] Living on own means, 1891.[267] Married Mary Butterwick, 3/10/1853, St Michael, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217,220] Mary, d/o Newby Butterwick,[217] born 1825,[210,217,267] Whitby, Co Yorkshire,[267] died December quarter, 1875, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (48yo).[220] Resided 1851, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] Resided 1858, 1861, 1867, No.55 Castlegate, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,267,269,270] Living with them, 1861, was Mary Ann Butterwick (11yo), servant.[267] Resided 1871, 153 St Michael Street, St Michael, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267] Resided 1881, School Place, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1891, 59 Luccocks Square, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267] Living with Thomas was John Smith, grandson.[267]
Children: (a)
 
William Robert Bilton, born 1854/1855,[127,210,267] Whitby,[127,267] baptised 16/2/1859, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1861, 1871.[210,267] Engine fitter, 1881.[127] Living with father, 1881.[127]
(b)
Mary Ann Bilton, born March quarter, 1857, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,217,220,267] With parents, 1861, 1871.[210,267] Married James Smith, 13/10/1877, St Michael, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217,220] James, s/o John Smith, born 1853.[217]
Children: (1)
 
John Smith, born 1882, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267] Resided, 1891, with grandfather, Thomas Bilton.[267]
(c) Newby Bilton, born March quarter, 1859, Malton,[220,267] baptised 29/1/1859, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1861, 1871.[210,267] Joiner, 1881.[127] Living with father, 1881.[127] Married Mary Bulmer or Sabina Steel, December quarter, 1887, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
Children: (1)
 
Herbert Butterwick Bilton, born December quarter, 1888, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(d) Isabel Bilton, born December quarter, 1862, Malton,[220,267] baptised 2/11/1862, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Domestic housekeeper, 1881.[127] With parents, 1861.[267] Living with father, 1881.[127]
ii.

John Bilton, born 1831, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199,267] Died 30/12/1865, Ampleforth, North Riding, Co Yorkshire.[259]
 "Railway Collision Near Malton. On Saturday afternoon a collision occurred at the Ampleforth station on the Malton and Thirsk Railway, which resulted in the death of one man named John Bilton, a mason, residing at Malton. The Malton and Thirsk is a single line of railway, but of late - for more than a year - an express train has been run in addition to the regular service, it has been supposed for the purpose of showing that there was not traffic for the North-Eastern, and therefore no necessity for the Leeds, North Yorkshire, and Durham competing project. This train consisted of an engine, one carriage, and guard's van, and it seldom carried passengers. The train has been looked upon as a subject for amusement, and has been designated "The Scotch Express," "Lord Faversham's Train," &c. The North Eastern have continued the running of this train, although the Leeds project is withdrawn, and on Saturday it had its usual compliment - no passengers, or the consequences might have been very disasterous. The empty "Scotch express" was coming down at its usual speed, and on nearing Ampleforth, Bilton, the deceased, who was working for the company, stepped on to a siding to let the train pass. For some unexplained defect at the points the train turned into the siding instead of keeping the main line, and thus killing Bilton, and running into two waggons standing on the side rails. The line was quite blocked up, and passengers had to be changed into short trains. An inquest will be requisite, when the cause of the accident will be fully sought into." (The Times, 1/1/1866, page 5).[259]
 
With parents, 1841 (9yo), 1851 (18yo).[199,218,267] Bricklayer, 1861.[267] Mason employed with Malton and Thirsk Railway Line, 1865.[259] Bricklayer, 1889.[422] Married Ann Croser, 11/11/1856, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,220] Ann born 1835, Rillington, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[127,267] died December quarter, 1903, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England (67yo).[220] Lodging house keeper, 1881.[127] Shopkeeper, 1889.[271] Living on own means, 1891.[267] John 23yo, s/o John Bilton.[216] Resided 1861, 46 Old Maltongate, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[210,267] Resided 1866, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[259] Ann resided 1881, Church Hill, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Living with Ann in 1881 was William Andrew, gardener, and William Collier, agricultural labourer.[127] Resided 1889, 1891, No.113 Church Lane, St Leonard, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Ann Bilton, born March quarter, 1857, Malton,[220,267] baptised 11/2/1857, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] General servant, 1871.[267] Domestic general servant, 1881.[127] Laundress, 1891.[267] With parents, 1861.[210,267] Resided 1871, 93 Saville Street School, St Michael, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[267] Living with mother, 1881, 1891.[127,267]
Children: (1)
 
Lilly Bilton, born June quarter, 1872, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,220] {Father listed as John Bilton on marriage certificate,[260] but John died before Lilly was born. Presumably either an illegitimate daughter of Mary Ann or Ann (nee Croser)} Living with mother, 1881.[127] Resided 1891 with aunt, Emily Newlove nee Bilton, Yedingham, Malton District, Co Yorkshire, England.[422] Married Francis William Dowson, March quarter, 1893, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(2) William Henry Bilton.[260] Died 1876, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[260]
(3)Agnes Bilton, born December quarter, 1876, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,220] Living with mother & grandmother, 1881, 1891.[127,267]
(b)
Jane Elizabeth Bilton, born June quarter, 1858, Malton,[220] baptised 5/5/1858, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Died June quarter, 1858, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(c) Elizabeth Bilton, born June quarter, 1859, Malton,[220] baptised 8/6/1859, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Died June quarter, 1859, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(d) Emily Bilton, born September quarter, 1860, Malton,[127,220] baptised 2/9/1860, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1861.[210,267] Domestic cook, 1881.[127] Servant, 1889.[422] Married Moses Newlove, 8/6/1889, East Heslerton, Co Yorkshire, England.[220,422] Moses, was a labourer, 1889.[422] Farm bailiff, 1891.[422] Moses born 1860, East Street, Co Yorkshire.[422] Resided, 1881, with George Cordiner, farmer, The Grange, East Heslerton, Co Yorkshire, England.[127] Resided 1891, Yedingham, Malton District, Co Yorkshire, England.[422]
Children: (1)
 
John Henry Bilton, born June quarter, 1883, Malton,[220] baptised 2/9/1883, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] With parents, 1891.[422]
(2)
Ann Elizabeth Bilton, born December quarter, 1884,[220] baptised 6/12/1884, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217]
(3)Sophia Bilton, born 1890, East Heslerton, Co Yorkshire.[422] With parents, 1891.[422]
(e) Elizabeth Bilton, born September quarter, 1862, Malton,[127,220] baptised 5/10/1862, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] General servant, 1881.[127] Resided 1881, with Joseph Baldwin, farmer, Rose Cottage, Terrington, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (1)
 
Rose Ann Bilton, born June quarter, 1880, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England,[127,220] baptised 1/8/1880, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] Living with grandmother, Ann Bilton, 1881, 1891.[127,267] Married William Mason Alderson or Moses Atkinson, December quarter, 1899, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(2)
Charles Richard Bilton, born December quarter, 1883, Malton,[220] baptised 6/4/1884, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[217] Died Deptember quarter, 1884, Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[220]
(f) Sarah Bilton, born March quarter, 1864, Malton,[127,220] baptised 6/4/1864, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Farm servant, 1881.[127] Resided, 1881, with John Lumb, farmer, Settrington Road, Scagglethorpe, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
(g) John Bilton, born March quarter, 1866, Malton,[127,220,267] baptised 4/2/1866, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] Ironmoulders Apprentice, 1881.[127] Plate railway labourer, 1891.[267] Living with mother, 1881, 1891.[127,267]
iii.

William Bilton, baptised 13/6/1832, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,422] Died infancy.
iv.

William Bilton, baptised 26/11/1834, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,267] With parents, 1841 (7yo).[199,267] Not in Co Yorkshire, 1851[218] & 1861, however a William, Joseph & James Bilton of the right ages are listed in the 1861 census as crew on British ships.[210]
v.

Joseph Bilton, baptised 11/1/1837, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216,267] With parents, 1841 (5yo), 1851 (13yo).[199,218,267] Not in Co Yorkshire, 1861, however a William, Joseph & James Bilton of the right ages are listed in the 1861 census as crew on British ships.[210]
vi.
James Bilton, born March quarter, 1839, Malton, Co Yorkshire,[220,267] baptised 30/1/1839, St Leonard, New Malton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[216] With parents, 1841 (2yo), 1851 (12yo).[199,218,267] Not in Co Yorkshire, 1861, however a William, Joseph & James Bilton of the right ages are listed in the 1861 census as crew on British ships.[210]


St Michael, Malton
St Michael, Malton
Image J.Thomas [Geograph]
St Michael, Malton, 1905
St Michael, Malton, 1905
Image - Malton History
St Leonard's, Malton
St Leonard's, Malton
Image Google StreetView
Malton is a market town and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England. It is located to the north of the River Derwent which forms the historic boundary between the North and East Ridings of Yorkshire. The combined population of both parishes was 4005 in 1821. By 1881 the population had risen to 5272, but by 2001 it had dropped back to around 4,000. The town stands on the site of a former Roman settlement, either Derventio or Delgovicia (contemporary records are somewhat vague as to the location of the teo settlements, however it is accepted that one of them was on the site of present day Malton). Malton is one of the most ancient Brigantian fortified towns in this part of Britain. The early importance of this station is shown by the number or ancient roads which point to it. No fewer than six Roman roads may be traced by military and other remains to this station. The Romans changed only the end of the older British name, to Camvlodvnvm. This name, by abbreviation, became the Saxon Meldvn, pronounced Maiden. Roman Malton was, from the second half of the first century, a busy and a lively place. Consisting firstly of the important cavalry fort whose remains lie in Old Malton, it eventually extended to include an adjoining area of civil settlement or vicus on the north bank, immediately south of the fort. Opposite, on the southern side of the Derwent was an area of ‘grid iron’ street planning and metal workshops which we know from an inscription included a goldsmith’s shop. These ‘planned’ Roman streets on the south bank therefore seem natural precursor to the more industrial atmosphere and activity which modern Norton still retains to this day, whilst Roman Malton across the river could boast at least one fine townhouse that was furnished with painted walls, mosaic floors, heated rooms and sculptural architectural decoration. Towards the end of Roman occupation Malton was attacked and ruined several times – by the end it was not much better than an enclosure of fallen rubble they were vainly cutting their fresh defensive ditches around. The Camulodunum of the Roman Britons became a royal villa to king Edwin in the Saxon era. The great Earl Siward, who defeated Macbeth, was one of the lords of Malton, and after the Norman conquest, the baronial family of Vesey, built a castle and a priory for Gilbertine canons, of both which there are remains at this day. In 1138 Malton was burned down by the then Archbishop of York in order to flush out the Scots occupying it at the time. Subsequent to the rebuilding, it became known as 'New Malton'. Malton sent members to parliament so early as the reign of Edward I. and at that period the Prior of Malton was elected a representative, who, on his return from parliament, was arrested for debt, but, pleading a privilege of exemption in going and returning from parliamentary duty, he was liberated; this is perhaps the earliest claim of the privilege by a member of parliament. New Malton comprises the parishes of St. Michael and St. Leonard, both of which were formerly chapelries under St Mary, Old Malton. In 1855 they were constituted as distinct parishes. The Church of St. Michael is an ancient stone structure in the late Norman style, with a western tower built in the Perpendicular period. The Church was restored in 1858 and again in 1888. St. Leonard's Church is an ancient stone building, founded in the 12th century as a Chapel of Ease to the Gilbertine Priory at Old Malton, originally erected in the Norman period, but subsequently restored in later styles. It comprises nave, with north aisle; chancel, with an isle on the north side; and a western tower, surmounted by a slated octagonal spire. The church was transferred to the Roman Catholic Church in 1971, having been deemed surplice to the needs of the Church of England.
1834: "Malton, (or New Malton) a market town and borough, in the wapentake of Ryedale, North Riding, is 214 miles from London, 84 n.e. from Manchester, 22 s.w. from Scarborough, and 18 n.e. from York. By the Saxons this town was named Maldune, and in Domesday Survey, written Maltun --- thus distinguished from the 'Malton' where the priory stood. In the reign of King Stephen it was laid in ashes by the army under Archbishop Thurstan, and when rebuilt acquired the name of 'New Malton.' It is pleasantly situated on the northern bank of the Derwent, and at the termination of a calcareous ridge, now called the 'Howardian hills.' The appearance of the town is neat and clean ; the market place is large and divided into two parts by the town hall and St. Michael's church. The country around is fertile, embellished by many genteel seats, and its agricultural state is very fine ... In the 1st of Queen Ann, the Derwent was made navigable from this place to the Ouse ; thus affording every facility for the transmission of corn, butter, hams, and other kinds of provision, which are here shipped for Hull, Leeds and other places : from the former groceries are brought, and from Leeds, woollen cloth, stuffs and coal. Within the last two or three years many improvements have been made in the town, particularly by the gas works, from which the streets, almost all the public buildings, and most of the shops are now supplied with a brilliant light. Malton was formerly governed by two bailiffs, but was deprived of its corporate privileges by a writ of quo warranto, in the time of Charles 2nd, since which period its municipal authorities have consisted of a bailiff and subordinate officers, who are chosen at the court leet of the lord of the manor (Earl Fitzwilliam) held annually at Michaelmas. The privilege of returning members to parliament has been enjoyed by this borough since the 23d of Edward 1st ; the borough bailiff is the returning officer, and the present representatives are John Charles Ramsden, Esq. and Charles C. Pepys, Esq. The new Boundary Act (an appendage to the Reform Bill) defines the limits of the borough to comprise the parishes of St. Michael and St. Leonard, in New Malton, the parish of Norton, and the parish of Old Malton. The same act appoints Malton one of the stations for receiving votes at the election of members for the North Riding of the county. Among the members which Malton has at different times sent to parliament, it has to rank two most celebrated men, viz. Edmund Burke and Henry Grattan ; men, whose eloquence and talents have been the boast of their own and the admiration of other countries."
1868: "... The town is governed by a bailiff and two constables, chosen at the court-leet of the lord of the manor. It has a board of health, and petty sessions are held every alternate Saturday. The general quarter sessions for the North Riding also take place here. It is well lighted with gas, and paved. It contains three banks, a savings-bank, mechanics' and literary institutions, with a library and newsrooms, townhall, corn exchange, county court- house, assembly rooms, masonic hall, theatre, and spacious market-place, from which the several streets diverge. The houses are generally well built, and many of them of modern erection. There are corn-mills, breweries, maltings, iron and brass foundries, and agricultural machine works. Lime and whinstone are quarried to a considerable extent. On the west side of the town is the cattle market, occupying an open area of 3 acres, on which slaughter-houses have been erected by Earl Fitzwilliam, who is lord of the manor and proprietor of the greater part of the land, which he inherits through the Wentworths. Old Malton church is an ancient stone structure dedicated to St. Mary. There are also two district churches in New Malton, viz: St. Michael's and St. Leonard's .. There are National, British, and infant schools. The Independents, Wesleyans, Wesleyan Reformers, Roman Catholics, Unitarians, Baptists, and Primitive Methodists, have each a chapel. There is also a meetinghouse for Quakers. At Old Malton are traces of a priory of Gilbertine canons, founded by Eustace Fitz-John in 1150. The union poorhouse is partly situated in St. Leonard's, and partly in Old Malton parishes. Market day is Saturday. Faire are held in the week prior to Palm Sunday, on the Saturday before Whitsuntide, and on the 11th October."
1890: "The town of Malton is situated on elevated ground overlooking the vale of the Derwent. It is about a mile in length, and contains a few good streets and a spacious market place, but its trade, since the construction of the railway, has become very inconsiderable. The Derwent was made navigable from Malton to the Ouse under the authority of an Act of Parliament, passed in 1701, and a considerable amount of trade was done with the port of Hull, vessels running regularly between the two places, but it is rarely now that a sloop is seen. The town, however, is still the business centre of the surrounding agricultural district, and the out-let for all the farm produce."[GenUKI, Wikipedia, Malton History]

School Place, Malton
School Place, Malton
Image Bryan of Dursley [Flickr]
Old Maltongate, Malton
Old Maltongate, Malton
Image - Malton History
Old houses, Market Street, Malton
Old houses, Market Street, Malton
Image Colin Grice [Geograph]



1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1.3. Jesse Bilton (s/o Joseph Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o Robert Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o David Bilton, s/o unknown Bilton & Anne Forest), born 1815[199]/1817[127,220]/1820[226]/1822[217,226,272], Whitwell On The Hill, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226,272] Died March quarter, 1886, York, Co Yorkshire, England (68yo).[220] Plate layer, 1861, 1874, 1881.[226,272] Married Mary Esh or Mary Jacques, December quarter, 1845, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Mary born 1825,[218] died December quarter, 1853, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[220] Married 2nd Martha Sherburn, 24/7/1854, St. Botolph's, Bossall, Co Yorkshire, England.[215,217] Martha,[226] d/o Joseph Sherburn, born 1838,[217,272] Escrick, Co Yorkshire, died 1891 & buried 19/10/1891, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[221] Jesse s/o Joseph Bilton.[215,217] By 1881 Jesse & Martha appear to have been separated, each listed as widowed.[127] Resided 1841, Rillington, near Malton, East Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[199] Resided 1851, Bootham, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[218] Resided 1861, Repairers House Station, Haxby, Co Yorkshire, England.[226,272] Jesse resided 1881, with Ann Wilson, innkeeper, Kings Arms, 43 Bilton Street, St Cuthbert, York, Co Yorkshire.[127] Martha resided, 1881, 57 Alfred Street, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]

Children of Jesse Bilton & Mary (Esh or Jacques):
i.
 
Sarah Bilton, born 1846, Flaxton, Co Yorkshire, England.[218,226] With parents, 1851.[218]
ii.

George Bilton, born 1849, Flaxton, Co Yorkshire, England.[218,226] With parents, 1851.[218] Died between 1851-1856.[226]
iii.

Anne Bilton, born 1851, Huntington, Co Yorkshire, England.[218,226,272] With parents, 1851, 1861.[218,272]

Children of Jesse Bilton & Martha Sherburn:
i.
 
Emily Bilton,[226] born 1855, Flaxton, Co Yorkshire,[272] baptised 25/3/1855, St. Botolph's, Bossall, Co Yorkshire, England.[215] {Father listed as John} With parents, 1861.[272]
ii.

George Bilton, born 1856, Strensall, Co Yorkshire, England.[127,226,272] {[127] gives place of birth as Middlesbrough} With parents, 1861.[272] Ironworks fireman, 1881.[127] Married Susan ('Susshan').[127] Susan born 1864, Ireland.[127] Resided 1881, 26 Robinson Street, Linthorpe, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
Children: (a)
 
George Bilton, born 1880, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
iii.

Ellen Bilton, born 1858, Haxby, Co Yorkshire, England.[226,272] With parents, 1861.[272] Married Joseph Iley, 23/5/1874, St John the Evangelist, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Witnesses James Burns & Mary Scandling, by banns.[226] Joseph, s/o George & Frances, born 1850, Marton, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Resided 1874, Atlas Street, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Resided 1881, 7 Tees Cottages, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Resided 1891, 88 Telford Street, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Resided 1901, 15 Dorothy Street, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
Children: (a)
 
George James Iley, born 2/7/1874, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Edith Annie Bruton, 29/9/1897, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(b)
Joseph Iley, born 31/3/1876, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Mary Jane Stovin, 27/11/1899, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(c) William Iley, born 28/8/1877, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Died 1914, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Maria Ramsay, 2/1/1899, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Maria, d/o George Robert & Phoebe, born 1877, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(d) Robert Iley, born 6/7/1879, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Sarah Pool, 31/12/1902, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(e) Thomas Riley Iley, born 4/4/1881, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(f) Mary Jane Iley, born 12/7/1883, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Thomas Jefferson, 7/7/1902, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(g) Emily Iley, born 15/8/1885, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married George William Upton, 21/8/1912, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(h) Charles Iley, born 1888, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Frances Ann Dorey, 4/3/1911, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(i) John Iley, born 22/3/1890, 88 Telford Street, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Died 1890, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(j) Henry Bell Iley, born 15/6/1891, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Ethel May Brown, 5/8/1911, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(k) Mabel Iley, born 4/8/1894, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(l) Stanley Iley, born 14/5/1895, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(m) Rose Emma Bilton Iley, born 1898, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Albert Edward Morley, 16/2/1918, St John the Evangelist, Middlesbrough, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(n) Ivy Ellen Iley, born 1899, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Married Samuel Andrew Freeman, 26/11/1921, Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
(o) Maud Iley, born 31/3/1900, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[226]
iv.

William Bilton, born 1864, York, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Ironworks labourer, 1881.[127] Living with mother, 1881, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]
v.

Rose Emma Bilton, born 1870, East Coatham, Redcar, Co Yorkshire, England.[226] Living with mother, 1881, North Ormesby, North Riding, Co Yorkshire, England.[127]


St. Botolph's, Bossall
St. Botolph's, Bossall
Image Andy Kerridge [Geograph]
Bossall village
Bossall village
Image Google StreetView
St Mary's, Haxby
Old St Mary's, Haxby
Image St Mary's, Haxby
Bossall is a parish & village in the wapentake of Bulmer; 9 miles NE of York. It is situated on the banks of the river Derwent, and contains the chapelries of Buttercrambe and Claxton, and the townships of Bossall, Harton, Sand Hutton, and Flaxton. Bossall, which now consists of only a handful of houses was once a considerable village. Foundations of many houses have from time to time been discovered in an adjoining field. In 1821 the population of the village was 31. The church is dedicated to St Botolph, and built in the form of a cross, with a central tower. In addition to the parish church there are two district churches erected in the mid 1800s, one at Flaxton, and the other in the township of Sand Hutton. Flaxton is a village in the parish of Bossall. Evidence of Saxon inhabiation has been discovered near the village suggsesting it is of some antiquity. In 1821 the village had a population of 299. In 1868 the village had a chapel-of-ease. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists both had chapels in the village.[GenUKI]

Main Street, Haxby
Main Street, Haxby
Image Haxby Town Council
Kings Arms, York
Kings Arms, York
Image David Dixon [Geograph]
Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, 1896
Holy Trinity, North Ormesby, 1896
Image - Francis Frith
Haxby is a town and parish in the authority of City of York, on the River Foss, to the north of York, in North Yorkshire. The population in 1881 was 559. Haxby was named Haxebi by the Vikings. "By" mean township or farm, hence Haxby means Hakr's farm. Haxby has its roots in a Viking settlement established in the 9th century, as shown by the presence of a Viking cross base in the churchyard of St Mary's Church, and the discovery of a Viking cross shaft in a nearby garden. There is evidence of earlier occupation by the Romans, namely the site of a Roman villa on Haxby Moor, as well as the discovery of some Roman pottery. In the Middle Ages Haxby was a small township in the Royal Forest of Galtres. When Charles I divested himself of the forest in 1629, Haxby acquired 1,776 acres of land to add to its size, resulting in the parish of some 2,100 acres. In the 16th century had its own church built and at some point became a chapelry to the parish of Strensall. In 1862 it became a parish in its own right. Much of the current town centre is 18th and early 19th century architecture but significant redevelopment took place in Victorian times. The church (St Mary) dates from the 16th century, but was totally rebuilt in 1878. It is in the Early English style, and comprises chancel, nave, south porch, and western tower.[GenUKI, Wikipedia, Haxby Town]

Nelson Street, North Ormesby
Nelson Street, North Ormesby
Image - Billy Scarrow, North Ormseby History
St John the Evangelist, Middlesbrough
St John the Evangelist, Middlesbrough
Image - Postcard, 1900-1910
North Ormesby Rd f& cnr Atlas St, 1898, Middlesbrough
North Ormesby Rd & Atlas St, 1898, Middlesbrough
Image - Tales of a Teesside Tramline
North Ormesby is an area in the town of Middlesbrough, in North Yorkshire. It is situated just to the south of the River Tees. Its name, as well as those of various streets in the locality, aludes to the support given to the initial construction of North Ormesby, a "new town", in the later 19th century by contemporary members of the nearby Ormesby-based Pennyman family. North Ormesby is a village in Ormesby township, which rapidly increased in size in the mid 1800s as a result of the extension of the iron trade. In 1851 the number of inhabitants was under 500, by 1881 there were upwards of 7,000. The Church of the Holy Trinity was erected in 1869. It is a brick structure in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave with north aisle and porch, and a pinnacled tower. In 1871, the church was made parochial with a district embracing 7,387 inhabitants. The Catholic chapel, dedicated to St. Alphonsus, is a handsome Tudor building of red brick with stone dressings. The parish is under the government of a Local Board formed in 1865. The neighbourhood has in recent years seen something of a decline, with much of its original housing having long been demolished.[GenUKI, Wikipedia]

Newport Iron Works, Middlesbrough, about 1900
Newport Iron Works, Middlesbrough, about 1900
Image - Billy Scarrow, Middlesbrough History
Ironworkers at work, Middlesbrough
Ironworkers at work, Middlesbrough
Image Gazette Live
Ironworkers 'Back to Back' homes, Middlesbrough
Ironworkers homes, Middlesbrough
Image - The World of Fred & Kate Taylor
Middlesbrough is a city situated on the south bank of the River Tees in North East England. Historically part of the North Riding of Yorkshire, in 1968 Middlesbrough was created as an urban county. Middlesbrough today is almost entirely urbanised. To the northeast of Middlesbrough lies the Tees Estuary, 8km away. A few miles to the south lies the edge of the North York Moors National Park. Although the town is often thought of as a relatively recent settlement, the name Middlesbrough can be traced back a long way. Mydilsburgh is the earliest recorded form of the name. The element '-burgh', from the Old English burh (meaning 'fort') denotes an ancient fort or settlement of pre-Anglian origin. The spelling brough sets Middlesbrough apart from other English towns, which typically use the spelling borough. In 1801 Middlesbrough was a hamlet with a population of just 25 people living in four farmhouses. During the latter half of the 19th century it experienced a growth unparalleled in England. Development began with the purchase of the farm in 1829 by a group of Quaker businessmen who saw the possibilities of Middlesbrough becoming a port for the transport of north-east coal. They planned to create a town of 5000 with a port to allow shipment of coal from the South Durham collieries to London and other markets. New quays were built, in deeper water. The Stockton and Darlington Railway was extended to the new site which, at the time, was known as Port Darlington. Pease quickly realised the potential of the site for further development. The first house was built in West Street in April 1830. Within 10 years, annual coal exports increased from estimated 10,000 tons to 1.5m tons. By 1841, the population of Middlesbrough stood at 5,463. The first parish church, St. Hilda's had been constructed, along with a market and new dock had been cut into the Tees. A firm of Ironworkers, Bolckow and Vaughan had also opened a foundry. Though initially successful, Middlesbrough's coal-exporting trade suffered a marked decline as the new network of railways proved able to move coal more efficiently than by Port Darlington's seaward route. However, the discovery of iron ore at Eston and in the Cleveland Hills, coupled with the recognition of its usability converted Middlesbrough almost overnight from a coal town to an iron town. Situated on a navigable river with both coalfields and ironstone within easy reach, no town could have been more favourably located for an iron making centre. When the first blast furnace came into operation in 1851, 3000 tons of ironstone were processed daily. By 1861, there were over 40 furnaces in the district, with an annual output of 500,000 tons of pig-iron. The population in 1861 stood at 18,892, and by 1871 had swelled to 39,284. The phenomenal growth was accompanied by a chaotic rush of (inferior) house building, with rows of terraces being sandwiched between the back gardens of existing houses. As its population and industrial success grew, the grid iron pattern of streets and municipal buildings spread south until the new Town Hall and Railway Station, built in 1887 and 1877 respectively, were no longer in the central position as originally planned. The production of pig-iron began to fade after the 1870s, when steel and foreign competition increasingly competed in the market, although iron was still in demand by the shipbuilding industry. Steel production began in Middlesbrough in 1879 at the Bolckow-Vaughan's works. By the end of the century, Dorman and Long had appeared & became the dominant player in the market. The Bell brothers opened their great ironworks on the banks of the Tees in 1853. After rock salt was discovered under the site in 1874, a salt-extraction industry was founded. By the 1880s Bell Brothers had become a vast concern employing some 6,000 people. For many years in the 19th century Teesside set the world price for iron and steel. The steel components of the Sydney Harbour Bridge (opened in 1932) were engineered and fabricated by Dorman Long of Middlesbrough, the Bridge bears the stamp "Made in Middlesbrough" {Coincidently, Else Bilton, a descendent of Richard Bilton who emigrated to Australia, was on the Bridge for the opening ceremony}. Several large shipyards were established in Middlesbrough, including the Sir Raylton Dixon & Company which produced hundreds of steam freighters. The great steelworks, chemical plants, shipbuilding and offshore fabrication yards that followed the original Middlesbrough ironworks, significantly contributed to Britain's prosperity in the Victorian Era. Middlesbrough had the distinction of being the first major British town and industrial target to be bombed during the Second World War when the Luftwaffe visited the town on 25 May 1940. By the end of the 19th Century Middlesbrough had become a city of 91,000. The population of Middlesbrough, as county borough, peaked at almost 165,000 in the late 1960s but has been in decline since the early 1980s. The current population, as of 2010 estimates, is 138,000. The world famous explorer, navigator, and map maker Captain James Cook was born in Marton, which is now a suburb in the south-east of Middlesbrough.[Wikipedia, BillyScarrow, GenUKI] Working in foundries was dangerous. After an explosion in 1858 which saw several men blown into the river the North Yorkshire Infirmary was opened in 1864 close to the Iron masters district. The nearest hospitals before this time were in York and Newcastle. The old market square of Middlesbrough was in the North close to the industry, further development moved South away from the smoke and grime. The Town Hall was opened in 1889 together with municipal buildings. An electric tram ran along Linthorpe road at the turn of the 20th century, when most people did not have running water. For recreation Albert Park was opened in 1868 to which was added a bandstand and maze in later years. Middlesbrough United moved to Ayresome Park in 1903. As a result of the surge in industry the population of Middlesbrough doubled between 1880 and 1910 to 110,000. The need for housing was acute, leading to massive development of high density building. Much of this had no running water or sanitation and was within walking distance of the works. The back alleys were initially only wide enough to walk along and carry out waste by bucket. This became so problematic that a ruling was passed in 1875 to allow at least 9 feet of passageway for carriages. Washing was regularly strung across the alleys which meant washdays had to be agreed with neighbours. There were also so said to be lots of cats which used the walls as highways. Men used to play pitch and toss in open spaces. This was illegal and when pursued by the police they ran though the houses across the road into adjacent streets. Life in the terraces painted a bleak picture of poverty and particularly violent confrontation among the men. Most terraced houses opened straight onto the street and had no gardens. The fortunes of Middlesbrough rose and fell with the industry. The move from iron to steel caused major depression. In 1886 there were 806 unemployed people in the workhouse and another 7212 in outdoor relief. By 1892 15611 out of a male population of 40,000 were on relief. It was even worse in 1903 and by 1907 thousands of men were demonstrating for work and food. Even those in work earned about a pound a day. Women wore long skirts to cover their worn out boots and regularly pawned their underwear. In preparation for war in 1913 one third of England’s iron and steel was being produced in Middlesbrough. A recruitment appeal saw 20,000 young men go off to war, of which 3,300 never returned. So acute was the shortage of labour that workers were attracted from many parts of the UK, only to join the dole queues after the war.[Fred&Kate Taylor] Life of an Ironworker, circa 1900. Ironworkers started work from about the age of sixteen. At their peak strength (age 20-40), they would be employed in the most physically demanding tasks, which would attract the most pay. As their strength declined, they would be shifted to lesser tasks, and paradoxically (by comparison to modern customs) their pay would decrease, as it was linked solely to their exertions, and not to experience. The environment they worked in was grim, with heavy air pollution, extreme heat and cold, and continuous noise. The Ironworks were a place of great danger, where accidents involving heavy machinery, or molten iron would generally be serious. Men would typically work 8 hours shifts, either 6am to 2pm, 2pm to 10pm or 10pm to 6am. The Ironworks would never close, not even on Sundays as the startup costs of the furnaces were too great. The table below lists and describes the various trades that would be found at an ironworks. Wage figures have been extracted from At the Works by Lady Florence Bell, wife of Hugh Bell, Ironfounder. This book, published in 1907, gives a detailed insight into the life of families associated with the Iron industry.[BillyScarrow]
 
Job Title
Job Description
Max Weekly wage
Furnace Keeper Responsible for keeping the furnace in top working order. This is one of the most responsible posts at the works. 3 0s
Slagger      
Charger Take barrows of calcined ironstone, limestone & coke from the lift at top of the blast furnace to the hopper where the charge is emptied. When the charge is complete, the bell is lowered, and the contents fall into the blast furnace. At this point, a sudden jet of vivid flame is produced at the top of the furnace. 2 0s
Minefiller Takes barrows of calcined ironstone from the kiln, via the weighman, to the lift at the bottom of the blast furnace at a rate of 10-12 barrows per hour. 2 2s
Brakesman      
Weighman Weighs the barrows of calcined ironstone. Job normally filled by the older men, who are obliged to accept lighter work as their strength diminishes. 1 0s
Coke-Tipper      
Helper      
Slag-tipper      
Gantryman Works on high platform along which trucks of ore, coal, cokes and limestone arrive. He stands on the platform above the kiln, and feeds the coal into the kiln from which the ironstone has already been tipped, using his judgement as to how much is added. 2 12s
Scarrer Breaks up fused ironstone that can block the eye at the bottom of the kiln through which the calcined ironstone is normally drawn out. The scarrer does this by thrusting a bar into the eye of the kiln. 2 s
Metal Carrier Moves the cooled pigs (iron ingots weighing about 55kg) by hand onto trucks.   
Boilerman      
Engineman      
Pump tender      
Crane tender      
Stove tender      
Labourer    1 3s
Joiner      
Moulder      
Pattern Maker      
Sailor Fitter