Greenwood's of Co Norfolk
A genealogical study of the Greenwood's of Co Norfolk, England. Because my own Greenwood's moved around a fair bit, in order to make a comprehensive study as possible of the family it was necessary to examine and chart all the Greenwood families of Co Norfolk, from before 1500 to after 1900.

Surname Index Page Norfolk Index Descendents of Erasmus Greenwood Other Greenwood's

Reproduction for the purpose of financial gain is prohibited. Redistribution of this material, in part or in its entirety, to a genealogical website/service which resells or charges for access is strictly prohibited - the material on this page is intended to be available free of charge and with unrestricted access. The data contained herein is for the most part either public domain or copyright of various statutory authorities, unless specified otherwise in the sources, and cannot be copyrighted by a third party. I make no claim regarding the accuracy of this chart; the original sources are not free from error and transcriptions may contain errors. Printing instructions: This document contains formatting which is incompatible with printing. To print use a text editor (eg: notepad) to remove all occurrences of "<fieldset>" and "</fieldset>" & then print in landscape mode, or email for a printable pdf. Last revision: 27th June, 2015. Layout & charts David Powell, email (roots-boots@hotmail.com), http://roots-boots.net/ft/names.html.

Caution - these files are large, both Greenwood files are around 1M in size so please be patient while the files display
Descendents of Erasmus Greenwood
Given the very rare use of the Christian name “Erasmus” it would seem likely that the Erasmus Greenwood who appears in Norwich by 1684 is a descendent of Erasmus of Bacton. Erasmus of Norwich was probably born before 1665, which is merely the latest feasible date of birth. He would have likely been born in the 1650’s (or even earlier if he married late). It is possible that Erasmus of Norwich is the son of Samuel (Erasmus of Bacton’s son), however this would leave the generations a bit too tight – Erasmus of Norwich would have had to be born when his father was 20yo or less and in turn have married when he was also 20yo or less. More likely he was a younger son – given the child mortality of the time he may well have been Erasmus & Margaret’s 2nd, 3rd or even 4th attempt at producing a son named after his father.



1. Erasmus Greenwood,[9] born before 1625. Married Margaret Money, 1/6/1641, St Andrew's, Bacton, Co Norfolk.[9]

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Margaret Money:

i.
 
Samuel Greenwood, baptised 21/3/1644, St Andrew's, Bacton, Co Norfolk.[9]
*
ii.

Erasmus Greenwood,[9] born before 1664.


St Andrew's, Bacton, Norfolk
Image - Church website photo gallery
Priory Gate, Bromholm Priory, Bacton
Image - Bromholm Priory
Bacton village, Norfolk
Image - Griffon Area Partnership

Bacton is on the coast of Norfolk, north-east of Aylsham (on almost a straight line from Aylsham, through North Walsham and onto the coast). There are a few scattered BMD events in the area pre-1700, however none have an obvious connection with Erasmus Greenwood. Bacton was was always a coastal village - it was originally an inland village, some distance inland from the village of Keswick. Thanks to flooding and coastal erosion Keswick has long since vanished and now Bacton lies on the coast. Bacton dates back to at least 495AD when the invading Saxons called it Bectuna ("Bec's Town"). After the Norman invasion the village was known as Bachetuna and passed into the hands of Robert de Glanville. His son, William, founded the Bromholm Priory in 1113. The priory had rather humble origins but in 1223 it bought a supposed piece of the Cross. Claims of miracles followed and the village and priory enjoyed an economic boom (Edward II was a noted visitor) which continued until the 16th Century & the dissolution of the monastic orders by Henry VIII. The village was particularly hard hit by plague in the late 14880's and again between 1625-1650. The latter is of particular significance since it during this time that the anscestor of this Greenwood family left Bacton and moved to Norwich. The church is sited some distance from the village centre (it has been speculated this was due to the decimation of the village in the plague). The present church building dates to the 15th Century, constructed from squared flint and stone.[81]



1.1. Erasmus Greenwood,[9] born before 1664. Married Judith Cobb, 1/4/1684, St Augustine, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Judith Cob:

i.
 
Martha Greenwood, baptised 25/12/1684, St Augustine, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Died before 1695.

ii.

Ann Greenwood, baptised 28/3/1686, St Augustine, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Died before 1695.
*
iii.

Samuel Greenwood, born c.1689, St Augustine, Norwich, Norfolk.[10]

iv.

Elizabeth Greenwood, baptised 24/5/1691, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Died before 1698.
*
v.

Edward Greenwood, baptised 27/5/1692, St Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10]
 
vi.

William Greenwood, baptised 1/8/1694, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10]
 
vii.

Anne Greenwood, baptised 23/6/1695, St Augustine, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Married James Norton, 3/1/1715, Cathedral Church, Norwich, Norfolk.[9]
 
viii.

Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 24/4/1696, St Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Died before 1700.

ix.

Elizabeth Greenwood, baptised 31/3/1698, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Married Richard Lambert, 4/10/1715, St Giles, Norwich, Norfolk.[9]
*
x.

Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 11/7/1700, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10]

xi.

Frances Greenwood, baptised 4/9/1701, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Died 1701.

xii.

Frances Greenwood, baptised 11/1/1702, St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10]


St Augustine, Norwich, Norfolk
Image - St Augustine Residents Association
Gildencroft Tudor Cottages, 16th Century
St Augustine parish, Norwich

Image - St Augustine Residents Association
St Augustine, Norwich, 1713
(sketch by John Kirkpatrick)

Image - St Augustine Residents Assoc.

St Augustine was one of 36 parish churches in medieval Norwich to survive the Reformation; but it has always seemed apart from the others & it is the last district within the old Norwich City boundaries to retain a distinctive identity. This isolation was partially geographical and partly deliberate. St Augustine's was cut off in the past from the main hub of Norwich's cultural, economic and political activity by distance and the River Wensum. In centuries past it was also a place where activities and people found inconvenient or intolerable south of the river found the space to exist and grow. It was once known as "Ultra Aquam" or Norwich ‘Over-the-Water’. It was home to some of Norwich’s chief trades and industries. Iron smelting was carried out there in the early Middle Ages; while in the 16th century many citizens, including religious and economic migrants found homes and work here, mainly in the wool-weaving trade. Religious minorities including Jews, Methodists & Quakers have also found refuge here during periods when the practice of their faiths and even the burial of their dead was deemed unacceptable elsewhere in the City. Here also, just outside the City Wall, was once located one of Norwich’s lazar (leper) houses; the site was later used as a workhouse for 'pauper lunatics'. St Augustine, originally known as St Austin's, is no longer a functioning church.[85,86] It is perhaps no surprise that Erasmus Greenwood (and/or his father), upon arriving in Norwich, settled initially in the St Augustine district - it was a place for refugees and Erasmus could well have been just that, although in his case a refugee escaping the ravages of the plague which was decimating his home village of Bacton. It is also possible that Erasmus was involved in the weaving trade since that appears to have been the primary employer in the St Augustine district at the time he appeared there. With a bit of a stretch of the imagination it is possible that he was even employed by Miles Greenwood (1627-1681) & his son John Greenwood (1653-1699) who were, at the time, the preeminent worsted weavers of Norwich.[9,24-27] Alongside St Augustine's graveyard are the Gildencroft Tudor Cottages, dating back to the 16th century.[85,86] Could Erasmus have lived in one of these during his years at St Augustine?


St Saviour, Norwich, Norfolk
Image - Norfolk Churches
Stump Cross, from St Saviour's, 1938
Image - Bromholm Priory
Magdalene St, near St Saviour's, 1938
Image - Griffon Area Partnership

St Saviour's has suffered rather unkindly over the centuries: in the 18th and 19th centuries the area became a slum. It survived WW2 intact but with the large-scale razing of large swathes of buildings across the poorer areas of Norwich following the war the church was virtually left without a parish. In the 1960's the church closed and spent the next several decades quietly decaying until it was aquired in the 1990's by The King's Church, Norwich's branch of the New Frontiers International Church. They restored the building, converting it into a hall with offices and a cafe for their youth ministry which continues to successfully operate from the site. At least St Saviour's is again functioning as a church, of sorts (it's now known as "The Gate"), something many of it's sister churches have lost. The church sits at the intersection of St Saviour Lane and Magdalene Street and today is surrounded by a large carpark & public toilet (on the site of the graveyard!) and rather unattractive looking factories and warehouses.[87,88] Most of the buildings in the St Saviour's area were of brick and flint construction and all were of two main storeys with lath and plaster dormers presenting a typical Norwich gabled skyline. Leading off the streets were the Norwich "yards", small cull-de-sacs leading to yet more tenements.[88] Sometime around 1690 Erasmus moved from St Augustine to St Saviour - less a step up in the world as a step sideways. No doubt he and his family lived in one of these tenements. Whether or not Erasmus remained in St Saviour's, it seems his surviving children all moved out.



1.1.1. Samuel Greenwood,[29] born c.1689, St Augustine, Norwich, Norfolk.[10] {May have been the Samuel Greenwood who was constable in Norwich in 1743,[10] although there is another Samuel who was in Norwich in the 1730's and Samuel, above, was in Great Yarmouth by 1731. There was also a Samuel Greenwood who was a witness at the marriage of Thomas Sabberton & Margaret Anderson, 5/6/1758, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2]} Married Ann Smith,[29] 19/3/1716-1717, Norwich Cathedral, Norfolk.[9,10] Ann died & was buried 1794, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29] {Age at death given as 66 by [29] which is obviously incorrect - Ann was likely around 96. Presumably the transcriber misread the original record or there has been a typo. Spouse & maiden name details are all correct}

Children of Samuel Greenwood and Ann Smith:

i.
 
Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 2/1717-1718, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2,9] Died & buried 27/12/1718, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2]
*
ii.

John Greenwood, baptised 15/1/1719-1720, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2,9,10]
*
iii.

William Greenwood, baptised 9/1722, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2,9,10]

iv.

Samuel Greenwood, baptised 27/9/1724, St Benedict Parish, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10]

v.

Ann Greenwood, baptised 22/3/1725, St Benedict Parish, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Married Thomas Nudd, 3/2/1746, Caistor, Co Norfolk.[10] Thomas, of Great Yarmouth, was a mariner.[10]

vi.

Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 10/3/1727, St Benedict Parish, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10]

vii.

Martha Greenwood, baptised 2/3/1730-1731, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10]

viii.

Robert Greenwood, baptised 25/3/1733, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10]
*
ix.

Elizabeth Greenwood, 29/9/1734, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10]



St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norfolk, 1938
Image - Photographs of old Norwich
Ruins of St Bartholomew, Heigham
Image - Old Norwich: Heigham
No 26 Heigham Street, Heigham 1938
Image - Photographs of old Norwich

St. Bartholomew's, Heigham, was the parish church for the village of Heigham. The church was built in 1254 and largely destroyed by bombing during a WW2 raid on 29/4/1942, all that remains is the tower. During the nineteenth century Heigham grew from a small village clustered around the church of St Bartholomew just to the north-west of Norwich, to a large residential suburb of Norwich today. The church, including the tower, was completely burnt out in the raid; only the walls were left standing. The tower, which had sustained only slight exterior damage, and was of unusual design was retained whilst the rest of the remains were demolished. In 1976 the tower was repaired and the site opened as a public park. Heigham had many medieval buildings, however little has survived the ravages of the WW2 bombings and the latter redevelopments. Homes were typically built of flint stone with (presumably) thatched roofs which were eventually replaced with tiles. The village of Heigham is thought to have originally been called Staunford, possibly from a paved ford which may have been here. Heigham Causeway, "Heigham Carnser," was an artificial road formed over wet meadows and no doubt gave rise to the present day name. Heigham is (or was) one of the lowest and most prone to flooding areas of Norfolk.[31,88,89]


St Benedict, Norwich, Norfolk, 1938
Image - Norfolk Churches
Ruins of St Benedict, Norwich
Image - Norfolk Churches
St Benedict St & City wall, Norwich, 1938
Image - Photographs of old Norwich

Like St Bartholomew's, Heigham, St Benedict, Norwich, was destroyed by a WW2 carpet bombing raid in January 1942 which saw the church and parish almost entirely destroyed. All that remains today of the church is the tower, which forms to focal point of a housing estate courtyard. The church was originally sited in a maze of narrow lanes that interspersed the courts between St Benedict's Street and Pottergate. St Benedict's Street itself is a part of the old city that has mostly survived; fine Victorian and Edwardian two and three storey buildings front the street, with much older ones huddling in courtyards behind. Once past the site of the church, the architecture of St Benedict’s Street has altered surprisingly little; the openings to many of the old yards remain, though little is left of the cottages they once contained. These days, this area is the heart of alternative Norwich. In the 1700's within a 500m stretch of road there were five medieval churches, none of which remain as a functioning church: St Laurence is one of Norwich's biggest, St Gregory probably its most interesting, St Margaret is used for exhibitions and St Swithin is the excellent Norwich Arts Centre. But it is the most westerly, St Benedict, which gives the street its name. It once gave its name to a gate in the city walls, as well. Not much of the original church remained to be bombed in 1942 - it had been extensively restored twice in the 1800's. Archaeological excavations in 1972 revealed four mediaeval building periods, along with traces of earlier religious uses of the site. The first church, possibly dating from late in the eleventh century, was a simple one of nave and small chancel. This was followed about a century later by the building of a tower and enlargement of the chancel, which was then made square-ended. In the third building phase all but the tower was demolished, to be replaced, perhaps early in the fourteenth century, by a slightly larger church having nave and chancel of equal width. Finally, during the fifteenth century the church was again rebuilt, to take on the form that survived up to 1942.[88,90]

1.1.2. Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 11/7/1700, St Saviours, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Died 1770, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.[10] Possibly the Erasmus Greenwood who was accused of the assault of Anthony Tolver at The Half Moon, St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, 11/1/1733-1734.[113] No charge was recorded.[113] {Alternatively it could have been his nephew, Erasmus, s/o Edward} Married Elizabeth Wilgresse, 9/7/1721, Norwich Cathedral, Norfolk.[9,10] Possibly married Elizabeth Rogers, 30/9/1833, St Lukes Chapel, Norwich, Co Norfolk &/or Elizabeth Rope, 14/6/1738, St Mary in the Marsh, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10] {Else they are 1st & 2nd wives of Erasmus born 1710, above}

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Elizabeth Wilgresse:
*
i.
 
Mary Greenwood, baptised 28/9/1722, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Married William Greenwood, 29/1/1744, St. Gregory, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] William, the s/o Samuel Greenwood & Ann Smith, was a first cousin of Mary. {See William Greenwood for descendents 1.1.2.}

ii.

Jonas Greenwood, baptised 18/6/1724, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

iii.

William Greenwood, baptised 26/6/1726, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

iv.

Jos Greenwood, baptised 11/5/1729, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] {Jonas? Joseph?}
*
v.

Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 22/8/1731, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]



St Giles, Norwich, Norfolk
Image - Norwich Churches
No 72 (Tudor), St Giles St, Norwich
Image - Photographs of old Norwich
Churchman House (pre 1724), St Giles
Image - Photographs of old Norwich

St. Giles on the Hill is the tallest parish church in Norwich at 34 metres and on top of that it stands on the highest point within the old city walls. In fact in terms of height above sea level it is as high as the anglican cathedral. The present church dates from the 1420s apart from a few minor additions in subsequent centuries. It replaced a previous St Giles which was built on the site in 1136, but there appears to have been a church on the site even before that (it's mentioned in the Domesday Book). The dedication is to the patron saint of the poor and marginalized, which may connect with the presence of a leper house just outside St. Giles Gate. Unlike most of the Norwich churches, St Giles remains today a functioning anglican church. After the Norman conquest it was one of the three large parishes forming the French Borough, the richest part of Norwich.[88,91,92,93]

1.1.3. Edward Greenwood, baptised 27/5/1692, St Saviour, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Married Jane.[9] {The following children are listed in [9] with father as "Erasmus". Unless there were two Erasmus' in Norwich at this time then they are in fact Edward's children. Erasmus' son, Erasmus, married in 1721, so Jane cannot be a 2nd wife of Erasmus Sr since she had a son, Erasmus}

Children of Edward Greenwood & Jane:
 
i.
 
Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 30/11/1710, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Possibly married Elizabeth Rogers, 30/9/1733 St Lukes Chapel, Norwick, Co Norfolk &/or Elizabeth Rope, 14/6/1738, St Mary in the Marsh, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10] {Presumably one or both are Erasmus' wives, else they are 2nd & 3rd wives of Erasmus born 1700}
 
ii.

Jane Greenwood, baptised 27/2/1711, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

iii.

Mary Greenwood, baptised 13/5/1714, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died before 1718.
 
iv.

Mary Greenwood, baptised 28/9/1718, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]
 
v.

James Greenwood, baptised 22/1/1719, St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]



St Simon & St Jude, Norwich, 1938
Image - Norfolk Churches
St Simon & St Jude, Norwich
Image -  Norfolk Churches
Wensum Street, Norwich
Image - Photographs of old Norwich

St Simon & St Jude stands on the corner of Wensum & Elm streets. It is in the heart of Norwich and within 200 metres of 5 other churches and literally across the road from the cathedral. No surprise that the past century has been unkind to it. Regular services ceased in 1894, but for a short while after that it was used for a Sunday School, and the patronal festival was celebrated annually until 1920. By that time decay had already set in and the church had become smothered with ivy. In 1911 the tower collapsed and by the 1930s it had been abandoned, an ivy covered- ruin, rapidly returning to earth. Plans to demolish the church in the 1930's were discarded thanks to the activities of the Norwich Society who raised money to have the church partially restored. In 1952 it was leased to the Boy Scouts Association for use as a shop. Rather drastic modifications were made inside to provide more rooms, but fortunately they were all independent of the structure and could be removed. The Scouts vacated the site in 1997 and in the decade since then the Norwich Historic Churches trust has been restoring the church, inside and out. Restoration was due to be completed in 2008 and the church leased to a dance academy. A church on the site is recorded in the Domesday Bookand it was the Bishop’s own church before the See moved to Norwich in 1094. It was rebuilt in its present form during the 15th century, the now lost tower being begun in 1446. Notable residents in the parish during the 1600's were the Pettus family who produced several mayors for the city of Norwich. The family produced several knights during the 1600's.[88,94,95] Edward Greenwood's home in (or near) the aprish in the early 1700's was obviously then a considerable step up in the world from the family's early decades in Norwich!



1.1.1.1. John Greenwood,[2,29] baptised 15/1/1719-1720, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Norfolk.[2,9,10] Presumably died after 1799 (his wife's burial does not indicate she was a widow). Married Frances Wootle.[2,29] Frances born 1719, died & was buried 1799, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] {Children of John & Sarah are speculative. See notes below. Also note that both Erasmus & William appear to have left Great Yarmouth around the same time, mid to late 1780's. A Richard Greenwod appears in Great Yarmouth around 1760, however he was a stray from Aylsham and had moved back to Aylsham by 1763. John was not in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census - he either died before then or had moved elsewhere}

Children of John Greenwood & Frances Wootle:
*
i.
 
William Greenwood,[8,9] born before 1760. {Speculative. However only three adult male Greenwood's were known to have been in Great Yarmouth in the mid 1700's: John, his brother William and their cousin Erasmus. Erasmus married 1758 and William had a son, William, born 1755, precluding them as the father of William, born before 1760}
*
ii.

Erasmus Greenwood,[9] born 1755. {Speculative. However only three adult male Greenwood's were known to have been in Great Yarmouth in the mid 1700's: John, his brother William and their cousin Erasmus. Erasmus married 1758 and William had a son born 1755 almost certainly precluding them as the father of Erasmus, born 1755}

iii.

Robert Greenwood,[2,29] probably born before 1760. {William had a son, Robert, who died before 1760. Unlikely to be the s/o Erasmus since 'Robert' does not appear in that branch. Robert's presumed father, John, had a brother named Robert} Married Lydia.[2,29]
Children: (a)
 
William Greenwood, baptised 1784, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

iv.

John Greenwood,[2,8,29] probably born before 1760. {Probably too old to be the son of Erasmus and William had a son John who died 1757 leaving John as the likely father} Married Sarah.[2,8,29]
Children: (a)
 
John Greenwood, baptised 23/11/1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]


1.1.1.2. William Greenwood,[2,8,29] baptised 9/1722, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Died & was buried 1782 (possibly 1781), St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2] Married Mary[2,8,29] Grinwood, 29/1/1744, St. Gregory, Norwich, Norfolk.[9,10] Mary Greenwood (1.2.2), d/o Erasmus Greenwood & Elizabeth Wilgresse, was a first cousin of William (see above), born 1722, Norwich, Norfolk, died 1763 and buried 18/9/1763, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.[2,10,29]

Children of William Greenwood & Mary Greenwood:

i.
 
Edward/Edmund Greenwood,[2,8,29] probably born before 1755. {Presumably the s/o either William or his brother, John. Placed as the s/o William since Edward's oldest known son was named William} Married Mary Simpson.[2,8,29] Edward was not in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census - he either died before then or had moved elsewhere with his family}
Children: (a)
 
William Greenwood, born 1781.[29] Died & was buried 1789, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29]
(b)

John Greenwood, baptised 7/12/1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]
(c)

Nathaniel Greenwood, baptised 8/7/1786, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]
*
ii.

William Greenwood, baptised 26/10/1755, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Co Norfolk.[2,9]

iii.

Samuel Greenwood,[2,8,29] born before 1760. {Speculative. Could alternatively be the s/o John or Erasmus but likely the s/o John or William since their father was Samuel} Married Githa.[2,8,29]
Children: (a)
 
John Greenwood, baptised 1780, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]

iv.

Mary Greenwood,[2,29] born before 1763. Died & buried 1768, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2]

v.

John Greenwood, baptised 1757, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,10,29] Died 1757,[10] buried 1757, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

vi.

Robert Greenwood, baptised 1758, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] Died & buried 1758, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

vii.

James Greenwood, baptised 1758, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] Died & buried 1758, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]
*
viii.

James 'Jonas' Greenwood, baptised 1760, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth.[2,10,29]

ix.

Abigail Greenwood, baptised 1763, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]


St Nicholas, Gt Yarmouth, 1896
Image - Francis Firth Photographers
St Nicholas, Gt Yarmouth
Image - Medieval English Towns
Ruins of St Nicholas, Gt Yarmouth, 1942
Image - Great Yarmouth & Gorleston Guide

The Church of St Nicholas in Great Yarmouth, which is the largest parish church in England (it's actually larger than some cathedrals), was founded in 1101 by Herbert de Losinga, the first bishop of Norwich, and consecrated in 1119. It is cruciform, with a central tower, which perhaps preserves a part of the original structure, but by successive alterations the form of the church has been completely changed. It continues to operate today ay the parish church for Great Yarmouth. The building is sited in the central area of Great Yarmouth and has a graveyard stretching over a kilometre to the north. St. Nicholas' reflects the essence of medieval Yarmouth as a town reliant on the sea and its harvest. Dedicated to the patron saint of sailors and others who earn their livelihood from the sea, it was built to replace an earlier church believed to have been created to serve the local and visiting fishermen. During the Medieval period the church was at its most magnificent with stained glass, tapestries, painted and gilded walls, frescos, 19 chapels, various relics of the saints and ornate furnishings. At this time Great Yarmouth was the fourth richest town in England. Attached to the church was a priory which operated as the Priory School after the reformation and is now a cafe. The church was heavily "vandalised" by the Puritans - the ornamental brasses were cast into weights and the gravestones cut into grindstones, the chapels were all demolished and the valuable utensils disposed of. Even worse, brick walls were built inside the church separating it into three so that the puritans, presbyterians and Church of Englanders could simultaneously worship. {Talk about bedlam!} The puritans levied a tax on the townsfolk to pay for the vandalism (the money from the "giant garage sale" naturally enuf vanished elsewhere). Restorations in the 1800's finally removed the brick walls and restored much of the architecture to the pre-puritan state. In 1942 the church was completely gutted during a German air raid leaving only the Norman tower and the walls standing. The church was rebuilt on its medieval plan and re-consecrated in 1961.[96,97,98]

1.1.1.3. Elizabeth Greenwood, baptised 29/9/1734, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.[10] Died 1818 and was buried 4/10/1818, St Giles, Norwich, Norfolk.[10] Had moved to Norwich, Norfolk, by 1785.[10] Elizabeth was the executrix for the estate of her cousin, Erasmus Greenwood Jr., in which Elizabeth and several of Erasmus' nephews were the beneficiaries, Elizabeth inheriting property and household goods.[12] Elizabeth's will (made in 1810) leaves her house etc to her daughter, Ann Wright, "for her own sole and absolute use and disposal and without the control of her said husband".[11] In her will she also left five pounds to her "eldest son" William (evidently Francis Jr had died before 1810) and the same sum to her daughter, Elizabeth Cousins; Ann Wright was the sole executrix.[11] Married Francis Allman, 5/5/1761, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,10,29] Francis was born about 1730/1735 {For more details & generations refer to the Allman charts}

Children of Elizabeth Greenwood & Francis Allman:


i.
 
Elizabeth Allman, baptised 23/8/1762, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10] Married John Gann Cousins, 26/6/1787, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10,11] John was a cordwainer.[12]
Children: (a)
 
Maria Cousins, baptised 1788, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk. Died 1788, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10]
(b)

Clarissa Cousins, baptised 1798, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10]
(c)

John Cousins, baptised 1800, St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10]

ii.

Ann Allman, baptised 1/4/1764, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10] Married James Wright, 25/7/1785 at St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] James was a breeches maker.[12]
Children: (a)
 
Edward Wright, baptised 1790, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]
(b)

Priscilla Elizabeth Wright, baptised 1802, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

iii.

Francis Allman, baptised 9/9/1765, Great Yarmouth,Co Norfolk.[10] The will of Francis' mother made in 1810 lists William as her eldest son, so presumably Francis had died before then.[11] In 9/10/1777 Nathaniel Symonds, Esq, bought the indenture by which Francis had bound himself for seven years.[111] Symonds was a wealthy and prominent citizen of Great Yarmouth.[12] Francis completed his apprenticeship and became a Freeman of Great Yarmouth in 1788, listed as a mariner.[12] Married Sarah Peck, 19 or 20/12/1794, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,10] Sarah was born before 1774, Brownston, Suffolk.[10] The will of Francis' mother indicates he died before 1810,[11] a Sarah Allman married Thomas Doc, 1802, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[10] If this  was Francis' wife, then he evidently died before 1802.

iv.

William Allman, baptised 11/8/1767, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[9,10]

v.

John Greenwood Allman, baptised 3/6/1769, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,10] In the 1861 census John was listed as a widower and a baker by trade, living at 93 George Road, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[12] John was not in Norfolk for the 1851 census. Married Mary Elizabeth Staff, 5/12/1790, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Married 2nd Elizabeth Ann Betwood, 14/9/1801, St Mary, Marylebone, London.[12]
Children: (a)
 
John Allman, baptised 1790, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10]
(b)

Ann Allman, baptised 1803, St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,9,10]

vi.

Samuel Allman, baptised 3/11/1771, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,10] Baker, 1851.[1,12] In 1841 Samuel was living at Mill Street, Lakenham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[12] Married Mary Wanstall, 22/7/1794, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,9,10] In 1851 resided Lakenham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Allman, baptised 1796, St Martin at Oak, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,9,10]
(b)

Charles Allman, born c.1800. Died 1805, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[12]
(c)

Samuel Allman, baptised 1801, St Martin at Oak, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,9,10] Died 1877.[10] Married Lydia.[1] In 1851 resided Lakenham, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1]
(d)

Maria Allman, baptised 1807,[9,10] St Michael Coslany, Norwich, Co Norfolk. Died 1807, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[10]
(e)

Ann Allman, baptised 1809, St Michael Coslany, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Died 1841.[10]

vii.

Joseph Allman, born c.1772/1773 in Norwich, Co Norfolk.[12] Was a tailor and habit maker at the time of his marriage.[12] Was listed in the 1842 Norwich Guide & Directory as a baker at Upper Regent St, New City.[12] Married Elizabeth Lill, 19/8/1794 at St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,10] Elizabeth was born 1776.[12]


Norwich Castle, Norwich, Co Norfolk (1100)
Image - Rural Rides
Norwich Cathedral, Norwich (1096)
Image - 24 Hour Museums
Dragon Hall, King St, Norwich (1430)
Image 24 Hour Museums

1.1.2.1. Erasmus Greenwood, born 1731,[2] baptised 22/8/1731, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died 1798 ("widower") & buried, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 67yo.[2] Erasmus was the licensee of the "Angel", Trowse Millgate (latter Trowse Newton), Co Norfolk, 1760-1763.[112] He was a blacksmith at the same time.[112] The "Angel" ceased operation between 1878-1882.[112] Married Elizabeth Grey, 8/4/1758, St Andrew, Trowse Newton, Co Norfolk.[2] Witnesses were Samuel Martin & Talbot Tuck.[2] Marriage by license.[2] At the time of the marriage Erasmus resided St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Elizabeth died & was buried 1781, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Elizabeth Grey:
*
i.
 
William Greenwood,[2,29] born before 1760. {Probable son. The other two Greenwood's in Great Yarmouth at the time, John & William, cousins of Erasmus, have sons named William - there were three William Greenwood's in Great Yarmouth who were born in the 1750's}

ii.

Charlotte Greenwood, born 1770.[29] {Possible daughter} Died & buried 1800, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk (30yo).[29] Married Thomas Hutt.[29]
Children: (a)
 
Elizabeth Hutt/Hull, born 1793.[29] Died & buried 1797, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk (4yo).[29]
(b)

John Hutt, baptised 1798, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29] Not present in Norfolk, 1851.[1]



1.1.1.1.1. William Greenwood,[2,8,29] born about 1745. Married Elizabeth Ann.[2,8] Elizabeth was listed as a head of household in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census, no age or occupation listed.[78] {William was not in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census - he either died before then or had moved elsewhere}

Children of William Greenwood & Elizabeth Ann:


i.
 
Benjamin Greenwood, baptised 1766, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] Died & buried 1772, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

ii.

Frances Greenwood, baptised 1767, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

iii.

Mary Greenwood, baptised 28/4/1769, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Married William Dawson, 29/3/1789, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]
Children: (a)
 
James Dawson.[2] Died 1792, buried 14/10/1792, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(b)

James Greenwood Dawson, born 6/3/1793, baptised 17/3/1793, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(c)
Charles Greenwood Dawson, born 20/2/1795, baptised 22/2/1795, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(d)
Robert Dawson, born 23/3/1796, baptised 25/3/1796, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(e)
Harriet Dawson, born 25/12/1797, baptised 31/12/1797, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(f)
John Westcote Dawson, born 22/9/1799, baptised 27/9/1799, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(g)
Matilda Dawson, born 15/4/1801, baptised 20/4/1801, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(h)
Edward Dawson, born 7/6/1803, baptised 10/6/1803, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(i)
Wilfred Dawson, born 15/4/1805, baptised 16/4/1805, St Catherine, Ludham, Co Norfolk.[2]
(j)
Barber Dawson, baptised 1806, All Saints, Mattishall, Co Norfolk.[2,29]
(k)
Hered Dawson, baptised 1808, All Saints, Mattishall, Co Norfolk.[2,29]

iv.

Samuel Greenwood, baptised 24/2/1771, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]

v.

Anne Greenwood, baptised 15/3/1773, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Died & buried 1773, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] {Mother listed as "Mary" on baptism & Ann on burial}

vi.

Anne Greenwood,[29] born 1774, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29] Died & buried 1774, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] {Mother listed as Ann on burial}

vii.

Anne Greenwood, baptised 14/12/1777, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Died & buried 1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2]

viii.

Charles Greenwood, baptised 28/3/1779, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]

ix.

William Grinwood, baptised 10/5/1780, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,29] Died & was buried 1781 (possibly 1782), St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2]


Great Yarmouth & Harbour from air
Image - Yarmouth Harbour
The Tolhouse, Great Yarmouth, pre 1300
Image - History of Medieval Yarmouth
Town Hall, Great Yarmouth
Image - Lancaster Unity

Great Yarmouth is a coastal town in Norfolk and lies at the mouth of the River Yare. The town itself is on a thin sand spit sandwiched between the North Sea and Yare. Yarmouth (Gernemwa, Yernemuth) lies near the site of the Roman camp of "Gariannonum" at the mouth of the River Yare. Tradition has the first settlement there established by the Saxon leader, Cerdic, c.495. More certain is that silting in the mouth of the "Great Estuary" over time formed a huge sandbank that came to be several miles long, leaving the Yare access into the sea through two channels at either end of the sandbank. This sandbank eventually became firm enough to support dwellings, perhaps preceded by more temporary facilities for the drying, salting and smoking of herring, as well as the sale of herring. A fair may have been in operation there by the time of Edward the Confessor. There were 70 burgesses living in Yarmouth in 1066 according to the Domesday Book, which suggests that its fishery was already important by then and the town probably totalled a few hundred residents. There was one church in 1066 - St Benedict's. The town received a charter from King John in 1208. In the medieval mind, Yarmouth was associated with herring, a high-protein food important to the diet of the lower classes. The thirteenth century seal of the borough bore depictions of a ship sailing herring-inhabited waters and, on the other side, St. Nicholas, a patron saint of fishermen. The fishery provided the reason for Yarmouth's foundation and the principal source of its medieval economy. During World War I Great Yarmouth suffered the first aerial bombardment in the UK. The town suffered bombing during World War II but much is left of the old town, including the original 2000m protective mediaeval wall, of which two-thirds has survived. Of the 18 towers, 11 are left. On the South Quay, there is a 17th century Merchant's House, as well as Tudor, Georgian and Victorian buildings. Behind South Quay, there is a maze of alleys and lanes known as "The Rows". Originally there were 145. Despite war damage and post-war reconstruction, several have remained. The Tollhouse, with dungeons, dates from the late 13th century and is said to be the oldest civic building in Britain. The Market place is one of the largest in England, and has been operating since the 13th century. In addition to its history as a fishing port, Great Yarmouth has been a seaside resort since 1760 (it even has a real sand beach) and today it services offshore oil rigs. Yarmouth is famous for its "Rows", a series of passages – too narrow to be called streets – separating the medieval tenements; by the end of the Middle Ages there were some 150 of them. The close packing of buildings, with only narrow streets separating the rows of houses, was not unusual in medieval towns, although the extent to which this was applied in Yarmouth is quite unusual. This system of laying out the land-holdings of the townsmen is evidenced as early as 1198, and continued into the thirteenth; most rows were named after some prominent family residing there. The rows all ran east-west (between the river and the shore), while the few main streets of the town ran north-south.[108,109]

1.1.1.1.2. Erasmus Greenwood,[9] born 1755.[76] Cabinetmaker.[76] Died 25/2/1848 & buried Burnham Market, Co Norfolk.[76,79] Erasmus is buried in the same plot as his son and daughter-in-law, the gravestone inscription reading:
In / memory of / Erasmus Greenwood / who died Oct 20th 1850 / aged 67 years /
and Elizabeth his wife / who died Feby 26 1855 / aged 72 years / also of /
Erasmus Greenwood / who died Feby 25th 1848 / aged 93”[76]
The gravestone is of gothic style, made from sandstone.[76] Married 1st Sarah[2,29] Elmer, 24/12/1778, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Sarah died between 1779-1781.[29] Married 2nd Lydia Church,[9] 13/5/1781, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Resided Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk 1782-1784, thence to Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Sarah Elmer:
 
i.
 
James Greenwood, baptised 18/7/1779, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Died before 1794.

Children of Erasmus Greenwood & Lydia Church:


i.
 
Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 25/3/1782, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Died 20/10/1850 (67yo) & buried Burnham Market, Co Norfolk.[76,79] In the same plot was also buried his wife and father.[76] At the time of his death was an Army pensioner living in Back Lane (off Station Road), Burnham Market, Co Norfolk.[76] Married Elizabeth[76] Johnson, 27/12/1802, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Elizabeth born 1782/1783,[1,76] Norwich, Co Norfolk,[1] died 26/2/1855 (72yo) & was buried Burnham Market, Co Norfolk.[76,79] In 1851 Elizabeth was living with Erasmus’ nephew & his wife, Erasmus & Frances Greenwood, Road near the church, Burnham Sutton & Burnham Ulph, Docking, Co Norfolk.[1]

ii.

William Greenwood, baptised 1/2/1784, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

iii.

John Greenwood, baptised 11/12/1785, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

iv.

Susan Greenwood, baptised 9/12/1787, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

v.

Edward Greenwood, baptised 31/1/1790, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

vi.

George Greenwood, baptised 16/3/1792, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]
*
vii.

James Church Greenwood, baptised 18/4/1794, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]
*
viii.

Benjamin Greenwood, baptised 26/1/1806, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]



1.1.1.2.1. William Greenwood,[2,8,9] baptised 26/10/1755, St Bartholomew, Heigham, Co Norfolk.[2] William was listed in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census, no age or occupation listed.[78] Married Elizabeth Wright,[2,9,29] 14/1/1779, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Married 2nd Ann Christian,[2,9] 6/1/1788, Saint Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] {There is something of an anomaly here - Hannah, Elizabeth & Charles are indexed as being the children of William and Elizabeth. The William who married Mary Ann, if he is the same person, seemed to hop back and forwards between Norwich and Great Yarmouth. There also appears to be an overlap between the two marriages. However a son of William and Elizabeth named a child after the husband of a daughter of William and Mary, strongly suggesting a close connection. Was William a bigamist? Or were William's children from 1788-1792 incorrectly indexed as being Elizabeth's?}

Children of William Greenwood & Elizabeth Wright:
*
i.
 
William Greenwood,[8] born about 1780/1785. {Presumed son. Parents unknown but it seems likely William had a son named William}

ii.

Frances Greenwood, born before 1785. {Possible daughter} Married Ezra Barber, 19/2/1805, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[9] No trace of Ezra or Frances in the 1851 census.

iii.

John Wright Greenwood, baptised 17/9/1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

iv.

Elizabeth Greenwood, born 6/4/1785,[8] baptised 8/5/1785, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] Died & buried 1785, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, infant.[2,29]
*
v.

Edward Greenwood, born 10/12/1786,[8] baptised 3/1/1787, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9]

vi.

Mary Greenwood, baptised 1787, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,29] Possibly married Henry Hodges, 26/9/1811, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

vii.

Hannah Greenwood, born 10/5/1788,[8] baptised 8/6/1788, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,9,29] Died & was buried 1796, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 7yo.[2,29]

viii.

Elizabeth Greenwood, born 29/10/1789,[8] baptised 23/11/1789, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,9,29] Died & buried 1793, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 3yo.[2,29]

ix.

Charles Greenwood, born 23/8/1792,[8] baptised 24/8/1792, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,9,29] Married Ann Maria Fuller, 24/11/1818, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9]

Children of William Greenwood & Mary Ann Christian:
*
i.

Robert Greenwood, baptised 7/11/1790, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]

i.
 
Elizabeth Greenwood, born 27/8/1794, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk,[1,6,8] baptised 15/12/1794, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Did not marry. Resided 1851, No.4 Beach Cottages, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, washerwoman, unmarried (incorrently listed in 1851 census as Green), along with her sister, Hannah.[1] Resided 1861, Ludham, Co Norfolk, on parish relief (listed as Greenwood but incorrectly listed as a widow - there is no matching married Elizabeth in the 1850 census).[6]

ii.

Ann Greenwood, born 26/12/1802,[2] baptised 2/1/1803, St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2,9] Married William Grew, 6/8/1822, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] {Ann is presumably the d/o William who earlier married Elizabeth Wright since 2-3 years after her marriage, Edward, s/o William, named a son William Grew Greenwood, indicating a close relationship between Edward and Ann, almost certainly siblings}

iii.

Hannah Greenwood, born 1805, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] In 1851 was living with her sister, Elizabeth, No.4 Beach Cottages, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, in care of a lodging house, unmarried (incorrently listed in 1851 census as Green).[1]



1.1.1.2.2. James 'Jonas' Greenwood,[8,9,29] baptised 1760, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth.[2,10] {James & Jonas were used interchangably[2,29]} Married Susan[8] Wright,[29] 29/8/1782, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] Susan born 1755, died & buried 1795, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth (40yo).[2,29] {James/Jonas appears to have died or left Great Yarmouth by 1803}

Children of James/Jonas Greenwood & Susan Wright:

i.
 
Sarah Wright Greenwood, baptised 8/1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] {Father listed as both James & Jonas}

ii.

Thomas Baker Greenwood,[29] born 1784, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk,[1] baptised 19/9/1784, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] {Baptism also registered, same date, at East Dereham, with mother's surname given as "Baker". Note that Thomas' mother was 5 years older than his father. Was she previously married, if so was Baker or Wright her maiden name? or was Baker in the East Dereham records a mixup with Thomas' middle name? According to 1851 census was sister to Frances below} Died March quarter, 1855, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Married 1st Mary Howe/Atthowe,[8,9] 30/4/1806, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[9] Married 2nd Elizabeth Acken, 18/12/1810, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] Elizabeth born 1786,[29] & died March quarter, 1847, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] In 1841 Thomas & Elizabeth resided White Lion Road, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29] No children were living with them.[29] In 1851 Thomas, a widower & retired wheelwright, resided with his sister, Frances, Middle Market Road, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] {Location of White Lion Road is unknown, possibly near the (Old) White Lion Inn, the oldest domestic building in Great Yarmouth, dating to at least the 16th Century}
Children: (a)
 
Thomas Howe Greenwood, born 7/5/1807, baptised 12/5/1807, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]
(b)

Mary Hannah Greenwood, born 25/1/1810, baptised 29/1/1810, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

iii.

Hannah Greenwood,[1,9] born 1784, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] {While I have not found her baptism, in the 1851 census she is listed as sister of Frances, below} Married Samuel Pelham Hopley, 8/8/1808, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[9] Samuel died before 1851. In 1851 Hannah resided with her sister, Frances, Middle Market Road, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] Hannah was a retired schoolmistress, 1851.[1]
Children: (a)
 
Mary Hopley, born 1826, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] Shoe binder, 1851.[1] Resided 1851 with Ann Read, aunt, Gaol Street, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] {Gaol Street is present day Friars Lane}

iv.

Elizabeth Greenwood, baptised 30/4/1786, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9]

v.

Mary Greenwood, born 15/10/1787,[8] baptised 23/10/1787, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Possibly married Henry Hodges, 26/9/1811, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]
*
vi.

Frances Greenwood, baptised 30/9/1789, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,9,29] Married Edward Greenwood,[29] 27/7/1814, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[9] Edward was the s/o William Greenwood and Elizabeth Wright.[9] {See entry for husband for descendents}

vii.

Jonas Greenwood, baptised 19/1/1792, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] No further trace in Norfolk.

viii.

Anne Greenwood, born 20/7/1793,[8] baptised 22/7/1793, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,9,29]


Cnr The Market & Middle Market, Great Yarmouth
Image - Gt Yar Perlustration
Regent Road, Great Yarmouth, 1901
(Runs parallel to Middle Market)
Image - Norfolk Pictures Old & New
White Lion Inn, Great Yarmouth. Est. early 1700's
Image - Norfolk Public Houses


1.1.2.1.1. William Greenwood,[2,29] born before 1760. Married Susanna[8] Hancock,[2,29] 24/12/1780, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Moved to Norwich c.1788/1789.

Children of William Greenwood & Susanna:

i.
 
William Greenwood, baptised 18/7/1781, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]

ii.

Susanna Greenwood, baptised 16/11/1783, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29]

iii.

Martha Greenwood, born 22/4/1787,[8] baptised 8/7/1787, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2,8,29] Married William Payn, 18/11/1811, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9]

iv.

Thomas Greenwood, baptised 4/1/1790, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9]




1.1.1.1.2.1. James Church Greenwood, baptised 18/4/1794, St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died 5/4/1880, Mason city, Mason Co, IL, USA.[114] Farmer.[114] Married Elizabeth M.[9,114] Elizabeth died 30/10/1879, Mason city, Mason Co, IL, USA.[114] Emigrated to the USA before 1837.[114] On 5/4/1837 James Church Greenwood, of Sangamon Co, IL, USA, purchased 160 acres  in Menard Co, IL, USA.[114] Resided 1850, Menard Co, IL, USA.[114] Resided 1860, Virginia city, Cass Co, IL, USA.[114] Resided 1870, Mason city, Mason Co, IL, USA.[114]

Children of James Church Greenwood & Elizabeth:

i.
 
Thomas Greenwood, born 1813, died 1816 & buried St Giles, Norwich, Co Norfolk (3yo).[2] {Possible son, no other with a St Giles connection}

ii.

Maria Greenwood, baptised 22/3/1818, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died 17/7/1860, Virginia city, Cass Co, IL, USA (42yo).[114] Married Rev. James White.[114]



1.1.1.1.2.2. Benjamin Greenwood, baptised 26/1/1806, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died 1830, 'perished In The Snow', and buried 19/1/1830, All Saints, Briston, Co Norfolk.[2] At the time of his death Benjamin resided Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[2] Married Maria Arnold/Arnell,[9] 15/5/1825, St Mark, Lakenham, Co Norfolk.[8] After Benjamin's death Maria remarried to Robert Gatherwood, 8/1/1832, St Mark, Lakenham, Co Norfolk.[8,9]

Children of Benjamin Greenwood & Maria Arnold:

i.
 
Erasmus Greenwood, baptised 9/4/1826, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,9] Died 3/11/1901 (75/76yo) & buried All Saints, Burnham Ulph, Co Norfolk.[46,79] The inscription on his gravestone reads: “In Loving Memory of/Frances/The Beloved Wife of/Erasmus Greenwood/Who Died/June 16th 1888/Ages 61/Thy Will Be Done/Also of the Above/Erasmus Greenwood/Who Died/November 3rd 1901/Ages 76/”Come unto Me all ya that labour/And are heavy hladen and I will/give you rest.”[46] Master baker, 1851, Burnham Sutton & Burnham Ulph, Docking, Co Norfolk..[1] Baker, 1854, Burnham Sutton & Burnham Ulph, Docking, Co Norfolk..[60] Miller & baker, Burnham Market, 1858-1888.[4,46] In 1860 Erasmus advertised seeking a mill stone: “To Millers & Millwrights. Wanted, one good free Second hand 4 ft. 8 in. diameter French Burr Mill Stone. Apply stating lowest price to E. Greenwood, Miller, Burnham Sutton, Norfolk” (Norfolk News – 20/10/1860).[46] In 1870 and again in 1872 and 1875 Erasmus advertised for an assistant to help to run the mill: “To Millers. Wanted, a man to Work a Windmill. Apply to E. Greenwood, Burnham Westgate, Norfolk,” (Norfolk News, 19/11/1870, 29/6/1872 & 30/10/1875).[46] In 1861 John Kerrison was listed as a “miller’s man”.[46] In 1883 Erasmus operated a wind-powered mill at Burnham Market, Lynn district, Co Norfolk.[45] In 1890 Erasmus was listed as a baker only, having worked the mill for 34 years (ie: from 1856).[46] It is uncertain whether the mill was in operation at this time. In 1891 Erasmus decided to retire as a miller and advertised the mill for sale in August 1891: “Burnham Market, within three minutes walk of G.E.R. Station. Capital Freehold Post Windmill, land & premises. To be Sold by Auction by George S. Andrew's. At the Hoste Arms Hotel, Burnham Market on Wednesday 12 August 1891 at 3 for 4 o’c in the afternoon (by direction of the proprietor, Mr. E. Greenwood, who is retiring from business & leaving the district), a capital Post Windmill. With substantially built Round House, driving two pairs of stones (4 ft. 8 ins. & 3 ft.) full sized Flour mill, fitted with patent sails & all necessary gear for carrying on the business of a miller. Also an enclosure of excellent land surrounding the mill and containing about half an acre (more or less) with a cart shed thereon. For the past 34 years in the occupation of the proprietor who is retiring from business. The Mill is in good working condition & may be viewed any day by arrangement. The property is all Freehold & immediate possession can be had if desired. Further particulars of the Auctioneer or of E.B. Loynes & Son, Solrs. Wells next the Sea.” (Lynn Advertiser – 1/8/1891 & 8/8/1891).[46] A month latter Erasmus advertised an auction of household goods: “Burnham Market. George S. Andrew's. Is favoured with instructions from Mr. E. Greenwood (who is retiring from business) to Sell by Auction on Wednesday 7 October 1891 part of the household furniture ... Sale on the premises at 11 o'c precisely.” (Lynn Advertiser, 26/9/1891).[46] William Love Porritt purchased the mill however it ceased operation c.1892.[46] Today a mill outbuilding, possibly the granary, still remains on the mill site.[46] Married Frances[1,46] Allen,[4]  June quarter, 1846, Kings Lynn district, Co Norfolk.[79] Frances born 1826,[1,4,46] Brancaster, Co Norfolk,[1,4] died 16/6/1888 & buried All Saints, Burnham Ulph, Co Norfolk (61yo).[46,79] Resided 1851, Road near the church, Burnham Sutton & Burnham Ulph, Docking, Co Norfolk.[1] Living with them was Elizabeth Greenwood, born 1782, Norwich, Co Norfolk, described as a widow and Erasmus’ aunt.[1] {At this stage I have found no trace of issue} Resided 1881, Front Street, Burnham Westgate, Co Norfolk.[4] Living with them 1881 was Ruth Vincent (domestic servant) & Elizabeth Allen (Frances' unmarried sister, a baker's assistant).[4] No issue.

ii.

Ann Greenwood, baptised 2/3/1828, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Married either Samuel Dixon Jessup or Jeremiah White, September quarter, 1853, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] No trace of any of these in the 1881 census.[4]

iii.

Maria Greenwood, born 6/12/1829, baptised 7/3/1830, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] probably died September quarter, 1843, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79]


Greenwood grave, All Saints, Burnham Ulph
Image - Burnham Market Postmill
Site of Burnham Market Mill, 2006
Image - Burnham Market Postmill
All Saints, Burnham Ulph, Norfolk
Image - Norfolk Churches

Burnham Market postmill stood in the small village that comprised of Burnham, Ulph and Sutton that was on the east side of Burnham Westgate that later became known as Burnham Market. The mill was in Norton Lane, which was formerly known as Bellamy Lane (after the miller William Bellamy). It is probable that the mill was built as an open trestle mill with common sails but in later years it stood over a roundhouse and had clockwise rotating patent sails and a fantail carriage on a tailpole. The sails powered a single pair of 5ft stones in 1835 and 2 pairs of French burr stones and a flour cylinder in 1891, one pair of stones being 4ft 8ins and the other pair 3ft. A horse mill was operated in the flour house. The mill was sited not far from All Saints church. In 1772 the rector was the Rev. Edmund Nelson, the father of Horatio Nelson.[46] The mill itself does not remain today. Remaining is a brick shed, original purpose unknown, but now apparently serving as a garage or garden shed, plus a row of cottages, one or more of which no doubt was the home of Erasmus & Frances, another the residence of their assistant. Although Burnham Market is the largest of the Burnhams, it is not a historic parish, and in many ways it was an invention of the railway companies of the 19th century, who put one of their stations where three of the Burnhams had grown together - Burnhams Sutton, Ulph and Westgate. Sutton's church was lost in the 18th century, but those of Ulph and Westgate survived at either end of the green. Curiously, 'Ulph' comes from the Old English word for a wolf. Perhaps it was the name of one of the local warlords. All Saints is a rather simple and plain church, a towerless Norman church, extensively Victorianised with the replacement of virtually all the windows.[104] From the perspective it would appear that Erasmus' gravestone is behind the photographer of the picture of the church.


St Clement Colegate, Norwich
Image - Norfolk Churches
Thoroughfare Yard, Norwich
Image - Image - Old Norwich
Thoroughfare Yard, Norwich
Image - Image - Old Norwich
2-10 Calvert Street, Norwich
Image - Image - Old Norwich

St Clement stands at the point where medieval and modern Norwich meet; to the south is the cathedral precinct, while to the north is the industrial heart of Norwich. The church was declared redundant in the 1960's but was saved from demolition by a local Methodist minister, Jack Burton, who leased the church on behalf of the Norwich transport workers trade union, partly with the intention of its use as a chapel. Whilst Rev Burton has since retired, he retains the lease and the church continues to operate as a chapel, freely open to the public for private prayer every day. The only service which is now formally held in the church is the Parker service, which was commissioned by Matthew Parker, who left funds for the benefit of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, subject to the annual service been held at St Clement. Parker, who became Archbishop of Canterbury in the reign of Elizabeth 1st, was educated by the rector of St Clements. For his various "investigative activities" he was given the epithet "nosey parker" - a description still in use today. St Clements’s was built close to Fye Bridge, the river crossing of the major historic north-south axis of the City. It is thought to be Saxon in origin and to have been one of the first in the City erected on the north side of the river. It probably dated from around 1040, although no evidence from this period is visible. The present church is almost entirely the work of the 15th century, although the chancel is slightly earlier. The church is still contains all the internal furnishings from when it was decommissioned in the 1960's. These date from the 19th century, a time when St Clement's congregation was almost wholly drawn from the local tenements and slums that housed industrial workers.[106,107] This gives a clue to the conditions Benjamin Greenwood & his family were living in. St Clement's stands near the corner of Colgate & Magdalene Streets and its parish likely included the southern part of Magdalene Street, Fye Bridge Street, the eastern part of Colegate Street and possibly the southern part of Calvert Street. Thoroughfare Yard was probably a minute or two walk from St Clement.

1.1.1.2.1.1. William Greenwood,[8] born about 1780/1785. Died before 1838.Married 1st Mary.[8] Mary died between 1820-1823. Married 2nd Catherine Harlock, 9/2/1823, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk (both previously married).[8] Catherine resided alone 1841 (presumably widowed), Row 138 Dog & Duck Row, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[29] Catherine born 1771, outside of Co Norfolk,[29] & died March quarter, 1849, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] No trace of any of the children in 1841 or 1851 census'. Presumably they all died young and/or emigrated.

Children of William Greenwood & Mary:

i.
 
William Wickstead Greenwood, born 23/4/1808,[8] baptised 14/2/1820, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

ii.

Eliza Ann Greenwood, born 20/1/1813,[8] baptised 4/2/1820, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

iii.

Mary Greenwood, born 20/3/1818,[8] baptised 4/2/1820, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]

iv.

John Greenwood, baptised 3/2/1820, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8]


Row 139, Great Yarmouth
Image - The Rows of Gt Yarm
Maps of Row 138, 1772-1985
Image - Gt Yar Perlustration
Surviving Row House, Gt Yarmouth
Image - English Heritage
Crypt Found at Row 138, Gt Yarmouth
Image - Gt Yar Perlustration

Living space was very much at a premium in early 17th-century Great Yarmouth, then among the most prosperous fishing ports in England. Hence the inhabitants crowded into the town's distinctive 'Rows', a network of narrow alleyways linking Yarmouth's three main thoroughfares. Most 'Row houses' were damaged by World War II bombing or demolished during post-War clearances. Row 138 was variously called Union Row and Dog & Duck Row and stretched from South Quay to Middlegate Street. On one corner was a cut‑flint fronted house dating back to 1591 and on the other the "Dog and Duck", a well known Quay Tavern, which lent it's name to the row. The tavern had a sign of a dog chasing a duck in the water. At the other end was a house which for many years was the property and residence of William Danby Palmer Esq. On a complaint that the property was haunted, Mr. Palmer had it pulled down and a new residence erected on the site. Nearby was found the crypt, photographed above.[106,107]

1.1.1.2.1.2. Edward Greenwood,[1,6,8,12] born 10/12/1786,[8,29] baptised 3/1/1787, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] Died March quarter, 1863, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Listed in the 1803 Great Yarmouth census as "Carter, aged 27 (the age is out by 10 years, presumably a transcription error).[78] Carpenter, 1839.[36] Builder, 1841,[29] Master carpenter employing 5 men, 1851.[1] Married Frances Greenwood,[1,6,12,29] 21/7/1814, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,9] Frances was the d/o James Greenwood & Susan Wright.[9] Frances died June quarter, 1864, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Resided Market Place, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 1839.[36] Resided Middle Market Road, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk 1851.[1] Living with them in 1851 was Hannah Hopley, widowed sister of Frances, and Thomas, widowed brother of Frances.[1] {At its southern end, Market Place makes a right turn towards the coast and splits into three roads - North, Middle & South Market Road's. If Edward & Frances moved from 1839 to 1851 it was likely a distance of less than a block or the 1839 reference may have really been Middle Market Road}

Children of Edward Greenwood & Frances Greenwood:
 
i.
 
Edward Greenwood, baptised 13/5/1815, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died before 1819.

ii.

Charles Greenwood,[29] born 1816,[1] baptised 8/7/1816, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died September quarter, 1857, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] With parents, 1841, carpenter.[29] Resided Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 1851.[1] Carpenter.[1] Married Mary Norton,[1,6] 30/12/1847, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,79] Mary born 1831,[6,8] Sheffield, Yorkshire,[1] d/o Joseph Norton.[8] Mary resided Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 1861, a lodging house keeper.[6] Mary remarried 29/6/1862, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, to John Hatrick.[8,79]
Children: (a)
 
Charles Thomas Greenwood, born September quarter,[79] 1850, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1,6,79] Living with Edward & Frances Greenwood (grandparents), 1861.[6] Died June quarter 1864, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79]
(b)

William Edward Greenwood, born December quarter,[79] 1852, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[6,79]
(c)

Henry John W. Greenwood, born June quarter,[79] 1857, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[6,47,79] In 1871 was a cabin boy on the Enchantress Wherry.[47]

iii.

Henry Hodges Greenwood, baptised 8/3/1818, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] With parents 1841, painter.[29] Died December quarter, 1844, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79]

iv.

Edward Thomas Greenwood, baptised 21/12/1819, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died before 1824.

v.

Mary Ann Greenwood, baptised 27/6/1821, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Missing 1841.[29]

vi.

William Greenwood, baptised 1/8/1822, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died before 1824.

vii.

Edward Thomas Greenwood,[29] baptised 29/1/1824, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Living with parents, 1841, stone mason.[29] Died September quarter, 1844, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79]

viii.

William Greenwood, baptised 29/1/1824, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died before 1825.

ix.

William Grew Greenwood,[6,7] born 1825,[1,4,29,47] baptised 8/3/1825, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] With parents 1841, Iron Monger's apprentice.[29] Licensed Victualler, 1871,[47] 1881,[4] 1883.[7,44] Proprietor of the Lion Tavern, Nelson Road, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 1869-1887.[7,44,105] Died June quarter 1887, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk (62yo).[79] Married Cordelia Emerson,[4,8,47] 12/7/1860, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,79] Cordelia born 1827/1828,[4,8,47] Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk,[4,47,79] died September quarter, 1894, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk (68yo).[79] In 1851 Cordelia was living with William's brother, Charles, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[1] In 1871 resided St Nicholas Rd, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[47] In 1881 William resided 1 Euston Rd, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[4] Living with them was Cordelia's mother, Mary Emerson, a servant, Maria Nickerson, and William's niece, Emily Brown (b.1859).[4] After William's death Cordelia continued to operate the Lion Tavern until at least 1891.[105] The next license for the inn was issued 1896.[105] No issue.[4]

x.

George Samuel Greenwood,[6] born 1827,[1,4,29] baptised 1/9/1827, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8] Died September quarter, 1902, Atcham district, Shropshire (63yo).[79] With parents, 1841, no occupation.[29] Resided Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, 1851,1861.[1,6] Resided 1881, Aldbro Road, Leiston, Co Suffolk.[4] Builder, 1861.[6] Draper & grocer, 1881.[4] Married Emma Jane Budds,[1,4,6,8,79] 22/5/1851, St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,79] Emma born 1835, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk,[4] died December quarter, 1897, Atcham district, Shropshire (63yo).[79]
Children: (a)
 
Frances Emma Greenwood, born September quarter,[79] 1852,[8,42,79] Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[6,42,79] Died 1889, Blything, Co Suffolk.[42] Married James Fisk, 10/10/1871, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[8,79] James born 1842,[8,42] Rockland St Mary, Co Norfolk, s/o William & Anne.[42] Resided 1871, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[42] Resided 1881 Aldbro Road, Leiston, Co Suffolk.[4] Resided 1890, Blything, Co Suffolk.[42] Children: Harry Edward Fisk (1872), Frank James Fisk (1874) of Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk), Herbert George Fisk (1875), Edward Greenwood Fisk (1877), Harold William Fisk (1879), Kate Emma Fisk (1880) Allen Alfred Fisk (1882) of Leiston, Co Suffolk.[42]
(b)

Edward George Greenwood, born December quarter,[79] 1853, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[6,79] Married either Cornelia Brown or Adelaide Kate Cattermole, June quarter, 1878, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] Edward not in East Anglia, 1881.[4]
(c)

Frederick Charles Greenwood, born March quarter, 1853, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Died June quarter, 1858, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] {Presumed son - all other adult Greenwood's in Gt.Yar. at the time can be ruled out as the parents}
(d)

Frederick James Greenwood, born December quarter, 1861, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Died December quarter, 1861, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] {Presumed son - all other adult Greenwood's in Gt.Yar. at the time can be ruled out as the parents}
(e)

Frank W. Greenwood, born December quarter, 1866, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] Died December quarter, 1866, Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk.[79] {Presumed son - all other adult Greenwood's in Gt.Yar. at the time can be ruled out as the parents}
(f)

There were several other children born in Great Yarmouth in the 1870's who could also have been George & Emma's however it is likely that they moved to Leiston, Suffolk c.1874 when their daughter Frances moved there, precluding all born after that date (and one of those before was recycled latter). These children, all dying before 1881, are listed under the only other possible parents, James & Elizabeth Grimwood, originally of Lincolnshire. Their birth of their one confirmed child was registered as Greenwood.[79]


The Market Place, Great Yarmouth, c.1908
Image - Francis Firth Photography
Grocery Store, Leiston, Suffolk, c.1960
Image - Francis Firth Photography
Lion Tavern, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk 1997
Image - Norfolk Public Houses

1.1.1.2.1.3. Robert Greenwood,[2] born 1789, Norwich, Co Norfolk,[1,66,79] baptised 7/11/1790, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9] Died September quarter, 1873 (82yo), Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] From 1808-1815 was in the Royal Navy, probably as an officer or a rating.[66] Weaver, 1817, 1819, 1822, 1823, 1826, 1851.[1,2,33] Married Sarah.[2] Sarah born 1796, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] Sarah possibly died September quarter, 1853, Norwich, Co Norfolk, or September quarter, 1861, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] {I suspect the latter since it is closer to Robert's 2nd marriage and the earlier Sarah may have been the daughter of Robert's son, William (see next entry)} In Robert was 1851 was a lodger with Caroline Martin (b.1822, Norwich, a boot binder), Castle Ditches, St Michael at Thorne, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] In 1851 Sarah, a general servant, was an inmate at the Norwich Workhouse, St Andrew, Norwich, Co Norfolk {listed as married but not widowed}.[1] Robert married 2nd Charlotte Bushell, September quarter, 1870, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] Charlotte resided Mill Hill, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk (a widow), 1881.[4] Charlotte born 1801/1802, Norwich, Co Norfolk,[4,79] and died March quarter, 1891, Norwich, Co Norfolk (89yo).[79]

Children of Robert Greenwood & Sarah:

i.
 
Robert Greenwood, born 25/8/1817, baptised 31/8/1817, St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Died & was buried 6/3/1818, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2]
*
ii.

William Greenwood, born 11/1/1819,[1,2,33] baptised 17/1/1819,[2,9,33] St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,2,9,33]

iii.

Robert Greenwood, born 17/6/1822, baptised 23/6/1822, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Died 1822, St Stephen, Norwich & buried 20/8/1822, St Julian, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2]

iv.

Sarah Greenwood, born 31/7/1823,[1,2] baptised 3/8/1823, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Seamstress, 1851, boarder with William & Sarah Borrett, Muspole, St Mary Coslany, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] Married George Osborne, March quarter, 1862, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] Resided 1881, Magdalen Road, St James, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] George born 1819, Norwich, Co Norfolk (Sarah 55yo).[4] George was a market gardener, 1881.[4]
Children: (a)
 
William Osborne, born 1867, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[4] Living with parents, 1881.[4]

v.

Samuel Greenwood, born 29/4/1826, baptised 7/5/1826, St Stephen, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Died 1827, St Stephen, Norwich, buried 7/3/1827, St Julian, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2]

vi.

Samuel Greenwood, baptised 26/10/1828, St John de Sepulchre, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] Not in Norfolk, 1851, 1881.[1,4]


St Stephen, Norwich, Norfolk
Image - Norwich Churches
Houses along Ber Street, St Michael Thorn, Norwich
Image - Photographs of old Norwich
Cottages, All Saints Green & Westlegate , pre 1937
Image - Photographs of old Norwich

St Stephen's is a rather unusual looking church, chaotic even, a building that has been cobbled together. From the outside it looks a bit like the Coliseum with a tower stuck on the side. There are suggestions that early on there was a 2nd tower on the other side, but it did exist, it did not last for long. It was one of the three churches of the new French Borough. The earliest part of the church dates to 1522. There was a church here in the 14th century, and the ground plan was probably similar. What we see today externally is almost all the work of the early 16th century. St Stephen's is still a functioning Anglican church today.[102,103] Castle Ditches, now known as Castle Meadow, was originally the moat of Norwich Castle. Over the years it had become an unofficial rubbish dump. In the early 1700's the area was converted into cattle markets. Inns and pubs soon followed and the district had more pubs than Norwich had churches! St Stephen Street (running NE to SW) and Ber Street (running more or less NS), both heading more of less towards the castle, almost intersect in the southern part of Norwich & are connected by Westlegate.[88] It would thus seem that Robert stayed in the same general part of Norwich that he had been baptised, at least up until 1851. Robert's 2nd wife, Charlotte, ended up in St Clement's parish, which is in the north of Norwich, north of the river. Whether Robert & Charlotte moved there sometime after 1851 or Charlotte moved there after Robert died is unknown.



1.1.1.2.1.3.1. William Greenwood, born 11/1/1819,[1,2,33] baptised 17/1/1819,[2,9,33] St Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1,2,9,33] Married Elizabeth Smith, 29/8/1842, St Peter Parmentergate, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[9,79]In 1851 William was a resident of the "Infirmary & Bethel", St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] Occupation prior to admission was weaver, listed as a lunatic.[1] In 1851 "Eliza", with their children, resided Colegate Street, Old Blk Bay Yard, St Clement, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] Eliza was a silk filler, 1851.[1] Eliza born 1823, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[1] No trace of the family after 1851 although there were two William Greenwood's who died in Norwich between 1850-1880 who could be William and his son, also William (William Greenwood, died December quarter, 1853; ditto, March quarter, 1857).[79] Most likely Elizabeth left the county with her (surviving) children, possibly after her husband died in the 1850's. Eliza may have been the Eliza Greenwood, died December quarter, 1888, Norwich, Co Norfolk (63yo, ie: born 1825),[79] however she does not appear in the 1880 census. If this was Eliza then it would appear all but one of her children died in the 1850's, as well as her husband, and her remaining child emigrated.

Children of William Greenwood & Elizabeth Smith:

i.
 
Sarah Greenwood, born 1842, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] With mother, 1851.[1] Did not marry in Norfolk.[79] Possibly the Sarah Greenwood who died September quarter, 1853, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79]

ii.

William Greenwood, born 1844, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] With mother, 1851.[1] Did not marry in Norfolk.[79] Not in East Anglia, 1881, but no record of death.[4,79]

iii.

Richard Greenwood, born 1849, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] With mother, 1851.[1] Not in East Anglia 1881 & there is no record of his death or marriage in Norfolk so evidently left the county &/or emigrated.[4,79]

iv.

Thomas Greenwood, born 1849, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[2] With mother, 1851.[1] Did not marry in Norfolk.[79] Possibly the Thomas Greenwood who died June quarter, 1855, Norwich, Co Norfolk.[79] Did not marry in Norfolk.[79] Not in East Anglia, 1881,[4]


Bethel Hospital, Norwich, 1899
Image - Norwich Public Buildings
Cells, Bethel Hospital, Norwich, 1899
Image - Norwich Public Buildings
Black Boys Yard,
Colegate St, Norwich c.1938

Image - Norwich Public Buildings

Bethel Hospital was established in 1713 as the Infirmary & Bethel Asylum for the treatment of patients with mental illness. It was until recently the oldest surviving hospital in the country specifically founded for the care of the mentality ill and  the oldest building in the UK to have been in continuous psychiatric use. After 1974 when the in-patient facilities were closed, it continued as the Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry but finally closed in 1994 and has been converted to residential and office units.[100] "Occupies a commodious building in Bethel St, was erected in 1713, by Mrs Mary Chapman, agreeably to the request of her late husband, the Rev S Chapman, rector of Thorpe next Norwich, for the habitation of poor lunatics, & not for natural born fools or idiots. For its endowment, she settled, by will dated 1717, all her personal estate on 7 trustees, giving to them the sole power & management of this asylum for as many distressed lunatics as the revenues will afford, the city of Norwich always to have the preference. Considerable additions having been made to the hospital in 1807, & subsequent years, it has now accommodations for 70 patients, of whom about 35 are free, & small weekly sums, varying from 3s. to 8s. are paid for each of the others by their friends or parishes."[101] I have been unable to find any other reference to "Old Blk Bay Yard" on Colegate Street other than the 1851 census reference. Could it have been a miss-transcription of Old Black boys Yard? Black Boys was a merchant's tavern that faced onto nearby Calvert Street. In the early 1800's Black Boys Yard contained several residences and a music school.[88]



Legal note: Geograph images are Copyright the respective authors and licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic Licence, <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/>. Wikimedia & Wikipedia media is Copyright the respective authors and licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license, <http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:CC-BY-SA>. These licenses allow the reproduction of the above mentioned material on third-party websites without specific author permission. Under United States copyright law any work published before 1/1/1923, anywhere in the world, is in the public domain. Works also published in 2003 or later by authors who died before 1937 are public domain. Under United Kingdom copyright law images are in the public domain 70 years from the death of the author or 70 years after it was created if the author is unknown. In Australia, copyright on published images created before 1/5/1969 expired 50 years after the creation, for images created after this date, copyright expires 50 years after the first publication. Copyright on images created after 1/1/2005 is similar to that in the United States. Any images created before 1961 are thus in the public domain in Australia. Originality of expression is necessary for copyright protection, and a mere photograph or reproduction of an out-of-copyright two-dimensional work may not be protected under copyright law. I follow the practice of the Wikimedia Foundation, which considers reproductions of public domain works to also be in the public domain, regardless of their country of origin. Claims of copyright on such images is considered invalid & without legal basis. See, for example, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Public_domain> and <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:PD-US>.


[1] 1851 British Census of Devon, Norfolk & Warwick, CD-ROM edition, LDS, 1997.
[2] FreeREG (Parish Registrars), <http://freereg.org.uk/cgi/search.pl>, "Greenwood + Norfolk".
[3] Personal correspondence, Karen Redpath, 9/2/2008 & 10/2/2008.
[4] 1881
British Census, CD-ROM edition, LDS, 1999.
[5] Query posted to "Current and Previous Residents of the Great Yarmouth Borough", <http://web.ukonline.co.uk/gtyarmouth/features/guestbk/friend02.htm>, by Kate Salinovich, undated.
[6] FreeCen, <http://freecen.rootsweb.com/>, 1861 census: "Greenwood + Norfolk".
[7] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp.734-746. Public Houses Including Hotels, Inns & Taverns, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Jobs/Publicans.htm>.
[8] British Isles Vital Records Index; LDS, CD-ROM Edition, 1998 (2nd Edition).
[9] International Genealogical Index, LDS; 1994 edition, 1997 addendum (v.4.0): "Norfolk + Greenwood".
[10] Information from Eileen Broadbridge, from parish registers, bishops ranscripts, wills & IGI.
[11] Information from Eileen Broadbridge
; will of Elizabeth Allan nee Greenwood, 1810.
[12] Information from Eileen Broadbridge
; sundry sources.
[13] "The Eaton Family", Ami Bartholomew. Updated 26/8/2001; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=:546633&id=I7781>.
[14] Norfolk Transcription Archive, <http://www.genealogy.doun.org/transcriptions/index.php>: "Greenwood + Norfolk".
[15] Dolby Ancestors, Kenneth. Updated 7/1/2008; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=dolby1959&id=I1676>.
[16] Gordon & Jenn Birrell's Genealogy, Gordon & Jenn Birrell. Updated 18/4/2007; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=:3298977&id=I672>.
[17] Daryl Johnson. Updated 14/1/2008; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=evrybodydance&id=I07219>.
[18] "Descendants of Phoebe Gold and Isaac Greenwood of Norfolk", Alan Cash. Sourced from: Parish records, IGI, Norfolk Transcription Archive website, microfiche sets from Norfolk & Suffolk Record Offices; DART series of Norfolk Parish Register Transcripts; UK Census records; Ancestry.co.uk; FreeBMD; GRO indexes; BMD certificates; personal correspondence; <http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/cashewnut/Genealogy/PhoebeGoldIsaacGreenwoodPdf.htm>.
[19] Bolwick Mill & Additional History of the Shreeve family, Simon Shreeve, <http://www.norfolkmills.co.uk/Watermills/bolwick-shreeve-family.html>.
[20] 1780 Norfolk Chronicle newspaper Selections, 9/12/1780, p2, column 4; The Foxearth and District Local History Society. Transcribed by Janelle Penney from microfilm supplied by the British Library Newspaper Library, <http://www.foxearth.org.uk/1780NorfolkChronicle.html>.
[21] The Wilson Family, Joseph Ables. Updated 27/12/2007, <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=:3324836&id=I21553>.
[22] Davis Family Tree, Kacy Davis. Updated 20/11/2007; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kcdavis&id=I002850>
[23] A Precious Tapestry of Family, "DrgnMastr". Updated 16/1/2008, <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=drgnmastr&id=I4784>.
[24] "Munroe, Page, Staples, Blodgett, Sanger, Robbins, Swift and Allied Families", Polly Furbush. Updated 2/2/2004; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bopeep&id=I1425>.
[25] Familysearch.org: Pedigree Resource File, Submitter Number: 1965194-0529106162053; George Moody.
[26] Norwich textiles, Glossary, <http://www.norwichtextiles.org.uk/info/research-resources/glossaries/>.
[27] Norwich Diocesan Archives, Probate Inventories in the year from 26/3/1681, <http://nrocat.norfolk.gov.uk/Dserve/dserve.exe?dsqServer=128.60.0.31&dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqCmd=Show.tcl&dsqSearch=(RefNo=='DN/INV/62A/66')>.
[28] Greenwoods arriving in America 1700-1750, extracted from "The Complete Book of Emigrants", Peter Wilson Coldham, Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc, pp.257,436.
[29]
Norfolk Transcription Archive, <http://www.genealogy.doun.org/transcriptions/index.php>: "Greenwood + Norfolk".
[30] 'August 1650: An Act for the Advancing and Regulating of the Trade of this Commonwealth.', Acts and Ordinances of the Interregnum, 1642-1660 (1911), pp. 403-406. URL: <http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=56408>. Date accessed: 16 March 2008.
[31] Rye's Monographs of Norwich Hamlets No.4: History of the Parish of Heigham, Walter Rye, 1917, Roberts & Co, Ten Bell Lane. Electronic copy at <http://www.welbank.net/norwich/hist.html>.
[32] Pepys of Norfolk, <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~pepys/pepysons/latenorf/pafg02.htm>.
[33] Baptism Project 1813 to 1880, <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~tinstaafl/>.
[34] William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk: Marsham, 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/m/marsham/white1845.shtml>; Garvestone, 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/g/garveston/white1845.shtml>; Garvestone, 1883, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/g/garveston/white1883.shtml>; Catfield, 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/c/catfield/white1845.shtml>; Sporle, 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/s/sporle/white1845.shtml>; Flordon, 1883, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/f/flordon/white1883.shtml>; Whissonsett, 1864, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/w/whissonsett/white1864.shtml>; Wicklewood, 1864, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/w/wicklewood/white1864.shtml>.
[35] Hunt's Directory of East Norfolk with Part of Suffolk: Yaxham, 1850, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/y/yaxham/hunt1850.shtml>.
[36] Pigots Directory of Norfolk – 1839, transcribed by David and Barbara Kolle; <http://members.optusnet.com.au/bndkolle/norfdir.txthttp://members.optusnet.com.au/bndkolle/norfdir.txt>.
[37] The Slatter Family History pages, Howard Slatter. Updated 4/8/2006; <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~haslatter/history/bowdens/bk/f66.htm>. Sources: Census records (1851,1861,1881,1901), FreeBMD Website, Parish Register transcript, GRO index.
[38] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.392: Mattishall, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Mattishall.htm>. E.C.Apling, 3/2000.
[39] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.323: Garvestone, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Garvestone.htm>. E.C.Apling, 12/1998.
[40] Shipdham census, 1861. Transcribed by: Bonnie Ostler, 20/7/2003. <http://www.doun.org/transcriptions/documents.php?document_id=35574>.
[41] Norfolk Windmills: Garveston postmill, <http://www.norfolkmills.co.uk/Windmills/garveston-postmill.html>.
[42] Fiske Family Papers, 1000 years of the Fisk & Fiske families in Britain, <http://www.fiskes.co.uk>.
[43] 1851 Census, Parish of Heigham, <http://www.welbank.net/norwich/heigham1851.zip>.
[44] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 734-746: Public Houses, E.C.Apling, 4/1999, <http://www.btinternet.com/~e.c.apling/Jobs/Publicans.htm>. Also <http://apling.freeservers.com/Jobs/Publicans.htm>.
[45] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 724-725: Millers, E.C.Apling, 2/1999, <http://www.btinternet.com/~e.c.apling/Jobs/Millers.htm>.
[46] Burnham Market Postmill, <http://www.norfolkmills.co.uk/Windmills/burnham-market-postmill.html>.
[47] Some 1871 Great Yarmouth, Co Norfolk, census extracts, <http://www.doun.org/transcriptions/documents.php?document_id=31500>, <http://www.doun.org/transcriptions/documents.php?document_id=20868>.
[48] Online genealogy maintained by Amelia James: Samuel Greenwood, <http://www.remleml.com/mambo/phpGedView/individual.php?pid=I1359&ged=Elder_clean_10-07.ged>.
[49] Meeker, Pevehouse, Glackin, Thrush, Stephens Connection, Edie Baker. Updated 27/11/2007; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=bakere1&id=I3025>.
[50] Pat's Potpourri. Patricia McNamee; updated 15/12/2007; <http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:3323919&id=I17804>.
[51] Query posted to ancestry "Norfolk" board, Kate Salinovich, 26/8/1998, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/185/mb.ashx>.
[52] Query posted to ancestry "Norfolk" board, John Greenwood, 12/1/1999, <http://boards.ancestry.com/localities.britisles.england.nfk.general/32/mb.ashx>.
[53] 1664 Hearth tax list transcriptions for some Norfolk Co parishes, <http://www.genealogy.doun.org>.
[54] Mattishall Village Public Houses, <http://www.punchline.freeserve.co.uk/mat/pubs-1.htm>.
[55] Norfolk Public Houses: Woolpack, Yaxham, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkxyz/yaxhwo.htm>.
[56] From the Parish Registers of North Runcton. With Hardwick and Setchey (Setch), 1563 – 1812: North Runcton, transcriped Pat Greetham, 6/2003, <http://apling.freeservers.com/ParishRecords/NorthRunctonBaptisms.htm>.
[57] Francis White's History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk 1854, pp. 802-811: Academies. Transcribed A.J. Carter, 11/2000, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/EastDereham54.htm>.
[58] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, p.317: Flordon, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Flordon.htm>.
[59] Norfolk Public Houses: Railway Tavern, Flordon, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkf/flordon/flordrt.htm>.
[60] Francis White's History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk 1854, p. 618: Burnham Ulph and Burnham Sutton, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/BurnhamUlph54.htm>.
[61] Kelly's Directory for Cambridgeshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, 1883, pp. 238-9: Barnham Broom, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/BarnhamBroom.htm>.
[62] Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, p. 811: Garvestone, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Garveston54.htm>.
[63] Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp. 370-371: Fersfield, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Fersfield54.htm>.
[64] Francis White's History, Gazetteer and Directory of Norfolk 1854, pp. 815-817: Shipdham, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Shipdham54.htm>.
[65] Francis White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory, of Norfolk 1854, pp. 684-686: Walsoken, <http://apling.freeservers.com/Villages/Walsoken54.htm>.
[66] ADM29 - Admiralty: Officers' and Ratings' Service Records (Series II), taken from <http://catalogue.pro.gov.uk/>. Posted to Rootsweb Norfolk list, 21/2/2004, Geoff Lowe; <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/2004-02/1077404599>.
[67] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “Interests HOWARD + Greenwood and Whiterod”, by Kath Pierce, 14/1/2002, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/2002-01/1011024507>.
[68] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “GREENWOOD AND KING – WISBECH”, by John & Marlene Greenwood, 9/8/1998, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/1998-08/0902671142>.
[69] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “JOHNSON”, by Kath Pierce, 30/6/2000, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/2000-06/0962374038>.
[70] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “New Interests”, by Kath Pierce, 17/4/2001, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/2001-04/0987515505>.
[71] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “Re- Richardson”, 30/6/1998, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/1998-06/0899229596>.
[72] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “RE GREENWOOD”, by Bob Pierce, 16/1/1999, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/1999-01/0916519527>.
[73] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “Re: WADE and GREENWOOD at Garvestone”, by Terry Bruce, 26/4/1999.
[74] Query posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “GREENWOOD family”, by Terry Bruce, 16/1/1999, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/1999-01/0916483722>.
[75] 1851 Census extract posted to Rootsweb Norfolk mail-list, “HALL, GRAY, GREENWOOD, WATSON stray 1851 Census”, by Linda Hardy, 19/9/2005, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/norfolk/2005-09/1127108071>.
[76] Burnham market, Norfolk, Memorial Inscriptions, <http://www.burnhammarket.co.uk/photos/Inscriptions.pdf>.
[77] 1891 Norfolk census, Greenwood's extract, <http://freecen.rootsweb.com/cgi/search.pl>.
[78] Great Yarmouth, Norfolk - 1803 Census of Population, NRO Ref MF/RO 103/3, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/y/yarmouth/census1803.shtml>.
[79] FreeBMD, <http://freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl>, Norfolk+Greenwood.
[80] Wikipedia: Chelsea pensioner, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelsea_pensioner>.
[81] Bacton, http://www.northwalsham.org.uk/default.asp?page_id=11.
[82] William White's History, Gazetteer, and Directory of Norfolk 1845, <http://www.origins.org.uk/genuki/NFK/places/s/sporle/white1845.shtml>.
[83] Mid Norfolk - Necton Gathergood & Related Families, page 5, <http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/Gather3/Necton/page3.html>.
[84] Norfolk Public Houses: Hare & Hounds, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolks/sporle/sporlhh.htm>.
[85] Norfolk Churches: St Augustine, Norwich, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichaugustine/norwichaugustine.htm>.
[86] St Augustine's Resident Association, <http://www.staugustinesnorwich.org.uk/>.
[87] Norfolk Churches: St Saviour, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichsaviour/norwichsaviour.htm>.
[88] The History of Norwich Buildings, <http://www.the-plunketts.freeserve.co.uk/NorwichStreets.htm>.
[89] St. Bartholomew's, Heigham, <http://www.welbank.net/norwich/stbarts.html>.
[90] Norfolk Churches: St Benedict, Norwich, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichbenedict/norwichbenedict.htm>.
[91] Norwich Churches: St Giles, <http://www.trytel.com/~tristan/towns/florilegium/popreli02.html>.
[92] Norfolk Churches: St Giles, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichgiles/norwichgiles.htm>.
[93] Norwich Churches: St Giles, <http://www.norwichchurches.co.uk/St%20Giles/home.html>.
[94] Norfolk Churches: St Simon & St Jude, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichsimonjude/norwichsimonandjude.htm>
[95] Norwich Churches: St Simon & St Jude, <http://www.norwichchurches.co.uk/St%20Simon%20and%20St%20Jude/home.html>.
[96] The Priory and Parish Church of St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, <http://www.stnicholas-gy.org.uk/Homepage.html>.
[97] Wikipedia: St Nicholas, Great Yarmouth, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Nicholas_Church,_Great_Yarmouth>
[98] Medieval English Towns: Yarmouth - St. Nicholas's church, <http://www.trytel.com/~tristan/towns/ssl04.html>.
[99] Norwich Public Buildings, <http://www.the-plunketts.freeserve.co.uk/publicbuildings.htm>.
[100] Medical Heritage: Norfolk, <http://www.medicalheritage.co.uk/NORFOLK.htm>.
[101] Norfolk Asylums, <http://www.institutions.org.uk/asylums/england/NFK/norfolk_asylums.htm>, citing White's 1845 Directory of Norfolk, p.131.
[102] Norfolk Churches: St Stephen, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichstephen/norwichstephen.htm>.
[103] Norwich Churches: St Giles, <http://www.norwichchurches.co.uk/St%20Stephens/home.html>.
[104] Norfolk Churches: All Saints, Burnham Ulph, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/burnhamulph/burnhamulph.htm>.
[105] Norfolk Public Houses: Lion Tavern, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/gtyarmouth/gyl/gylih.htm>.
[106] Norwich Churches: St Clement, <http://www.norwichchurches.co.uk/St%20Clements/home.html>.
[107] Norfolk Churches: St Clement Colegate, <http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/norwichclement/norwichclement.htm>.
[108] Wikipedia: Great Yarmouth, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Yarmouth>.
[109] History of medieval Yarmouth, <http://www.trytel.com/~tristan/towns/yarmouth.html>.
[110] 1901 Census Online, <http://www.1901census.nationalarchives.gov.uk/search.asp?wci=ei_search_with_locale>.
[111] Information from Eileen Broadbridge, from Enrolment of Apprentices 1751-1781.
[112] Norfolk Public Houses: The Angel, <http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkt/trowse/trowang.htm>.
[113] Norwich City Archives, Coroners' Inquests, 1731-1740, NCR Case 6a/6. Posted to NORFOLK-L mail list, 31/1/2007, <http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/NORFOLK/2007-01/1170252714>.
[114] Personal correspondence, Sharon Natta, 19/8/2008. Sources: 1850,1860,1870 US Census'; US General Land Office Records, 1796-1907; US Federal Mortality Schedules 1850-1880.